Rashaun Woods

Rashaun Dorrell Woods (born October 17, 1980) is a former American college and professional football player who was a wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL) and Canadian Football League (CFL) for two seasons during the early 2000s. Woods played college football for Oklahoma State University, and received All-American honors. He was selected by the San Francisco 49ers in the first round of the 2004 NFL Draft, and played professionally for the NFL's 49ers and the CFL's Toronto Argonauts.

Rashaun Woods
No. 81
Position:Wide Receiver
Personal information
Born:October 17, 1980 (age 38)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:202 lb (92 kg)
Career information
High school:Oklahoma City (OK) Millwood
College:Oklahoma State
NFL Draft:2004 / Round: 1 / Pick: 31
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:7
Receiving yards:160
Receiving touchdowns:1
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Woods was born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. He attended Millwood High School in Oklahoma City, and played for the Millwood high school football team.

College career

While attending Oklahoma State University, Woods played for the Oklahoma State Cowboys football team from 2000 to 2003. He finished his college career with 293 receptions, 4,414 yards and 42 touchdowns—all Big 12 records. Woods was a two-time all-American, including being recognized as a consensus first-team All-American in 2002.[1] He became the eighth player in NCAA Division I-A annals to gain over 1,000 yards receiving in a season three times in a career. Woods also holds the NCAA single-game record for most touchdown receptions in a game (7 against Southern Methodist University in 2003) and most touchdown receptions in a half (5 in the first half of the same SMU game). All seven touchdowns were thrown by former Kansas City Royals infielder Josh Fields. In 2001, his biggest touchdown catch made during his college career was against Oklahoma Sooners down in Norman, where the unranked OSU Cowboys upset the highly ranked Sooners. Also, the following year he had 3 touchdowns against the Sooners, in the annual Bedlam game 2002.

Woods has two brothers who followed him to Oklahoma State. D'Juan who graduated in 2007, who played wide receiver and Donovan, a former Oklahoma State linebacker who spent time at safety and quarterback, graduated in 2008. D'Juan was picked up by the Jacksonville Jaguars as a free agent after the 2007 NFL draftJaguars.com while Donovan was a practice squad member of the 2008-09 Pittsburgh Steelers Super Bowl Championship team.

Professional career

Woods had 7 catches for 160 yards and 1 touchdown in his rookie season (2004) and spent the 2005 season on injured reserve with torn ligaments in his thumb. In April 2006, he was traded to the San Diego Chargers for cornerback Sammy Davis. In August 2006, he was cut from the San Diego Chargers. On August 3, 2006, he was claimed off waivers by the Denver Broncos but failed his physical and was released. In Dec. of 2006 he worked out with the Minnesota Vikings.[1]

NFL Europa

In 2007, the Hamburg Sea Devils selected Woods in the 5th round of the NFL Europa free agent draft.

CFL career

On July 23, 2007, Woods signed with the Toronto Argonauts of the Canadian Football League. He was released by the Toronto Argonauts on August 8, 2007. He was signed by the Hamilton Tiger-Cats on October 4, 2007. On June 22, 2008 Woods was 1 of 14 players to be cut from the Hamilton Tiger-Cats final roster.

Coaching career

After his playing career ended, Woods worked as an assistant football coach at Millwood and at Star Spencer High School, and also as a high school football radio commentator and professional bass fisherman. In January 2013, Woods was selected to be head football coach at John Marshall High School in Oklahoma City.[2] In January 2019, Woods was named head football coach for Enid High School in Enid, Oklahoma. [3]

See also

References

  1. ^ 2011 NCAA Football Records Book, Award Winners, National Collegiate Athletic Association, Indianapolis, Indiana, p. 11 (2011). Retrieved June 22, 2012.
  2. ^ Scott Wright, "Former Oklahoma State football star Rashaun Woods to be named coach at John Marshall", The Oklahoman, January 16, 2013 (pay site).
  3. ^ https://newsok.com/article/5619924/rashaun-woods-named-head-coach-at-enid

External links

2001 All-Big 12 Conference football team

The 2001 All-Big 12 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen as All-Big 12 Conference players for the 2001 NCAA Division I-A football season. The conference recognizes two official All-Big 12 selectors: (1) the Big 12 conference coaches selected separate offensive and defensive units and named first- and second-team players (the "Coaches" team); and (2) a panel of sports writers and broadcasters covering the Big 12 also selected offensive and defensive units and named first- and second-team players (the "Media" team).

2001 Oklahoma State Cowboys football team

The 2001 Oklahoma State Cowboys football team represented Oklahoma State University in the 2001 NCAA Division I-A football season. Les Miles was in his first season at Oklahoma State as head coach. In the three years prior to Miles' arrival in Stillwater, the Cowboys finished 5–6, 5–6, and 3–8. Oklahoma State posted another losing record (4–7) in Miles' first season at the helm.The final game of the season was a game to remember for the Cowboys. The Cowboys, amidst a losing season, went to Norman, Oklahoma to battle their state rivals, the Oklahoma Sooners. The Sooners had a possible National Championship on the line. The Cowboys won the game with a late catch by TD Bryant on third down and seven from the Oklahoma State 45 yard line. The catch went for 31 yards and set up the game-winning catch. Rashaun Woods then caught a touchdown pass from Josh Fields in the left corner of the end zone, giving the Cowboys the win.

2002 All-Big 12 Conference football team

The 2002 All-Big 12 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen as All-Big 12 Conference players for the 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season. The conference recognizes two official All-Big 12 selectors: (1) the Big 12 conference coaches selected separate offensive and defensive units and named first- and second-team players (the "Coaches" team); and (2) a panel of sports writers and broadcasters covering the Big 12 also selected offensive and defensive units and named first- and second-team players (the "Media" team).

2002 College Football All-America Team

The 2002 College Football All-America Team is composed of the following All-American Teams: Associated Press (AP), Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), Walter Camp Foundation (WCFF), The Sporting News (TSN), Pro Football Weekly (PFW), Sports Illustrated (CNNSI) and ESPN.

The College Football All-America Team is an honor given annually to the best American college football players at their respective positions. The original usage of the term All-America seems to have been to such a list selected by football pioneer Walter Camp in the 1890s. To be selected a consensus All-American, players must be chosen to the first team on at least two of the five official selectors as recognized by the NCAA. Second- and third-team honors are used to break ties. Players named first-team by all five selectors are deemed unanimous All-Americans. The NCAA officially recognizes All-Americans selected by the AP, AFCA, FWAA, TSN, and the WCFF to determine Consensus All-Americans.

2002 Houston Bowl

The 2002 Houston Bowl was the third edition of the college football bowl game (known in its first two years as the "Galleryfurniture.com Bowl"), and was played at Reliant Stadium in Houston, Texas. The game pitted the Oklahoma State Cowboys from the Big 12 Conference and the Southern Miss Golden Eagles from Conference USA (C-USA). The game was the final competition of the 2002 football season for each team and resulted in a 33–23 Oklahoma State victory.

2002 Oklahoma State Cowboys football team

The 2002 Oklahoma State Cowboys football team represented the Oklahoma State University in the 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Cowboys' Houston Bowl appearance in 2002 was only the second time in 14 years that OSU made it to a bowl game.

2003 All-Big 12 Conference football team

The 2003 All-Big 12 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen as All-Big 12 Conference players for the 2003 NCAA Division I-A football season. The conference recognizes two official All-Big 12 selectors: (1) the Big 12 conference coaches selected separate offensive and defensive units and named first- and second-team players (the "Coaches" team); and (2) a panel of sports writers and broadcasters covering the Big 12 also selected offensive and defensive units and named first- and second-team players (the "Media" team).

2003 College Football All-America Team

The 2003 College Football All-America Team is composed of the following All-American Teams: Associated Press, Football Writers Association of America, American Football Coaches Association, Walter Camp Foundation, The Sporting News, Pro Football Weekly, Sports Illustrated, ESPN, and Rivals.com

The College Football All-America Team is an honor given annually to the best American college football players at their respective positions. The original usage of the term All-America seems to have been to such a list selected by football pioneer Walter Camp in the 1890s. The NCAA officially recognizes All-Americans selected by the AP, AFCA, FWAA, TSN, and the WCFF to determine Consensus All-Americans.

2003 Oklahoma State Cowboys football team

The 2003 Oklahoma State Cowboys football team represented Oklahoma State University during the 2003 NCAA Division I-A football season. They participated as members of the Big 12 Conference in the South Division. They played their home games at Boone Pickens Stadium in Stillwater, Oklahoma. They were coached by head coach Les Miles.

2003 Texas Longhorns football team

The 2003 Texas Longhorns football team represented the University of Texas at Austin in the 2003 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by head football coach Mack Brown and led on the field by Chance Mock and redshirt freshman quarterback Vince Young.

2004 San Francisco 49ers season

The 2004 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 59th season, and 55th season in the National Football League.

The 49ers hoped to improve upon their disappointing 7–9 output from the previous season. However, the 49ers finished the season with the worst record in football, managing only two victories, both coming against division-rival Arizona Cardinals in overtime. The 49ers earned the #1 overall pick in the 2005 NFL Draft, where they selected quarterback Alex Smith, who would play for the team for eight seasons.

Head coach Dennis Erickson was fired after the season.

The season marked changes for the 49ers, who lost three key members of the 2001 team: Quarterback Jeff Garcia was released in the off-season and later signed with the Cleveland Browns, running back Garrison Hearst went to the Denver Broncos, and controversial wide receiver Terrell Owens went to the Philadelphia Eagles, where they lost to the New England Patriots in the Super Bowl.

Billy Bajema

William Daryl Bajema II (born October 31, 1982) is a former American football tight end. He was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers in the seventh round of the 2005 NFL Draft. He played college football at Oklahoma State.

D'Juan Woods

D'Juan Woods (born June 11, 1984) is a former American football wide receiver. He was signed by the Jacksonville Jaguars as an undrafted free agent in 2007. He played college football at Oklahoma State.

Woods was also a member of the New Orleans Saints. He was a part of the team that won Super Bowl XLIV. He is the younger brother of former NFL wide receiver Rashaun Woods and older brother of former NFL linebacker Donovan Woods.

Houston Bowl

The Houston Bowl was an NCAA-sanctioned Division I-A college football bowl game that was played annually in Houston, Texas, from 2000 to 2005. For its first two years, the game was known as the galleryfurniture.com Bowl, named for the website of the sponsor, a Houston furniture chain operated by Jim McIngvale. In 2002, the Houston Bowl was born and later named the EV1.net Houston Bowl, after sponsor EV1.net, for the remainder of the game's existence.

List of NCAA Division I FBS career receiving touchdowns leaders

This is a list of players in NCAA Division I FBS and its predecessors who have accumulated at least 40 receiving touchdowns in their college football careers. Statistics are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

List of NCAA Division I FBS career receiving yards leaders

This is a list of players in NCAA Division I FBS and its predecessors who have accumulated at least 4,000 receiving yards in their college football careers. Statistics are updated through the end of the 2018 season. Players still active in college are shown in bold.

List of Oklahoma State Cowboys in the NFL Draft

The Oklahoma State Cowboys football team has had 105 players drafted into the National Football League (NFL) since the league began holding drafts in 1936.Each NFL franchise seeks to add new players through the annual NFL Draft. The draft rules were last updated in 2009. The team with the worst record the previous year picks first, the next-worst team second, and so on. Teams that did not make the playoffs are ordered by their regular-season record with any remaining ties broken by strength of schedule. Playoff participants are sequenced after non-playoff teams, based on their round of elimination (wild card, division, conference, and Super Bowl).Before the merger agreements in 1966, the American Football League (AFL) operated in direct competition with the NFL and held a separate draft. This led to a massive bidding war over top prospects between the two leagues. As part of the merger agreement on June 8, 1966, the two leagues would hold a multiple round "Common Draft". Once the AFL officially merged with the NFL in 1970, the "Common Draft" simply became the NFL Draft.

Oklahoma State Cowboys football statistical leaders

The Oklahoma State Cowboys football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Oklahoma State Cowboys football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Cowboys represent Oklahoma State University–Stillwater in the NCAA's Big 12 Conference.

Although Oklahoma State began competing in intercollegiate football in 1901, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1945. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1945, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

The Cowboys have played in 26 bowl games in their history, with 14 of them coming since 2002. While the NCAA didn't count bowl game statistics until 2002, and most schools follow this policy, Oklahoma State's official records count all bowl game statistics. This means that while the NCAA recognizes Barry Sanders's single-season rushing yards record of 2,628 as the national record, Oklahoma State counts his stats from the 1988 Holiday Bowl as well and recognizes the record as 2,850 yards.These lists are updated through the 2017 season.

Rashaun

Rashaun is a given name. Notable people with the given name include:

Rashaun Allen (born 1990), American football player

Rashaun Broadus (born 1984), American basketball player

Rashaun Freeman (born 1984), American basketball player

Rashaun Woods (born 1980), American football player

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