Ranks and insignia of NATO

Ranks and insignia of NATO are combined military insignia used by the member countries of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

The rank scale is used for specifying posts within NATO.

Definitions

NATO maintains a "standard rank scale" in an attempt to match every member country's military rank to corresponding ranks used by the other members. The rank categories were established, in 1978, in the document STANAG 2116, formally titled NATO Codes for Grades of Military Personnel. There are two scales, though not all member countries use all the points on the NATO scales and some have more than one rank at some points (e.g. many forces have two ranks at OF-1, usually lieutenants):

Officer ranks

Warrant officers

  • Most countries do not have an intermediate tier of ranks between Officers and Other Ranks (see below). The exception is the United States, and the NATO warrant officer grades of WO1–WO5 (bottom to top) are used only for warrant officer ranks of the US military. In other countries with "Warrant Officer" ranks, they are considered part of Other Ranks. (For example a British Army WO1 has the NATO code OR-9.)

Other ranks

Comparison to other systems

The numbers in the system broadly correspond to the US military pay grade system, with OR-x replacing E-x and WO-x replacing W-x. The main difference is in the commissioned officer ranks, where the US system recognises two ranks at OF-1 level (O-1 and O-2), meaning that all O-x numbers after O-1 are one point higher on the US scale than they are on the NATO scale (e.g. a major is OF-3 on the NATO scale and O-4 on the US scale).

Officer
NATO code OF-10 OF-9 OF-8 OF-7 OF-6 OF-5 OF-4 OF-3 OF-2 OF-1 OF(D) Student officer
US DoD Pay Grade Special O-10 O-9 O-8 O-7 O-6 O-5 O-4 O-3 O-2 O-1
Enlisted
NATO Code OR-9 OR-8 OR-7 OR-6 OR-5 OR-4 OR-3 OR-2 OR-1
US DoD Pay Grade E-9 E-8 E-7 E-6 E-5 E-4 E-3 E-2 E-1

Ranks and insignia

Army

Air Force

Navy

See also

References

Citations

  1. ^ NATO glossary of abbreviations used in NATO documents and publications / Glossaire OTAN des abréviations utilisées dans les documents et publications OTAN (PDF). 2010. p. 235.
  2. ^ NATO glossary of abbreviations used in NATO documents and publications / Glossaire OTAN des abréviations utilisées dans les documents et publications OTAN (PDF). 2010. p. 238.

Sources

Army general

Army general is a title used in many countries to denote the rank of general nominally commanding an army in the field. Army general is normally the highest rank used in peacetime.

The equivalent position in the Commonwealth, U.S., and several other countries is simply termed general, four-star rank, or informally "full general".

The title "army general" should not be confused with the rank "general of the army", which is more senior, and corresponds to other countries' marshal or field marshal.

Comparative Ranks of Apartheid States in Southern Africa

Rank comparison charts of armies/ land forces of apartheid states and territories in Southern Africa.

Comparative army enlisted ranks of Oceania

Rank comparison chart of armies/ land forces of Oceania states.

Comparative army officer ranks of Oceania

Rank comparison chart of armies/ land forces of Oceania states.

Comparative navy enlisted ranks of Oceania

Rank comparison chart of armies/ land forces of Oceania states.

Comparative navy officer ranks of Oceania

Rank comparison chart of naval forces of Oceania states.

Feldwebel

Feldwebel (Fw or F), literally "field usher", is a non-commissioned officer (NCO) rank in several countries. The rank originated in Germany, and is also used in Switzerland, Finland, Sweden, and Estonia. The rank has also been used in Russia, Austria-Hungary, and Bulgaria.

Feldwebel is a contraction of feld meaning "field" and weibel, an archaic word meaning "usher". Weibel comes from the Old High German weibôn, meaning to go back and forth.

There are variations on feldwebel, such as Oberstabsfeldwebel ("Superior Staff Field Usher"), which is the highest non-commissioned rank in the German army and air force.

List of comparative military ranks

This article is a list of various states' armed forces ranking designations. Comparisons are made between the different systems used by nations to categorize the hierarchy of an armed force compared to another. Several of these lists mention NATO reference codes. These are the NATO rank reference codes, used for easy comparison among NATO countries. Links to comparison charts can be found below.

Military ranks of Hungary

The following table contains the Military ranks of the Hungarian Army. Both Land Forces and Air Force ranks are all the same. Hungary is a landlocked country and does therefore not possess a navy. Information taken from the Hungarian Ministry of Defence (HMoD).

Military ranks of Spain

The Military ranks of Spain are the military insignia used by the Spanish Armed Forces.

Obermaat

Obermaat is a military rank of the Bundeswehr and earlier other German-speaking armed forces.

Ranks and insignia of NATO air forces enlisted

The following are the ranks and insignia of NATO Air Forces Enlisted personnel for each member nation.

Ranks and insignia of NATO air forces officers

The following table lists the ranks and insignia of officers in NATO air forces.

Ranks and insignia of NATO armies enlisted

This page lists the enlisted ranks and insignia of NATO member armies.

For the comparison chart of the commissioned officers, see:

Ranks and insignia of NATO armies officers

Ranks and insignia of NATO armies officers

Commissioned officers' rank comparison chart of all land forces of NATO member states.

For the comparison chart of the enlisted, non-commissioned officers (NCO), see:

Ranks and insignia of NATO armies enlisted

Ranks and insignia of NATO navies' officers

Each officer rank in the navy of a NATO country may be compared with the ranks used by any military service in other NATO countries, under a standardized NATO rank scale. This is useful, for instance, in establishing seniority amongst officers serving alongside each other within multinational command structures.

The grades, prefixed OF- (commissioned officers) and WO- (warrant officers) were established in the document STANAG 2116, formally titled NATO Codes for Grades of Military Personnel.

In many navies, two separate ranks fall within the OF-1 grade. These particular ranks, known by various names in different navies, are commonly given the less formal grades of "OF-1a" (more senior) and "OF-1b" (less senior).

Ranks and insignia of NATO navies enlisted

This table shows the ranks and insignia of NCOs and Seaman in the navies of member countries of NATO. NATO maintains a "standard rank scale" in an attempt to match every member country's military rank to corresponding ranks used by the other members. The rank categories were established in the document STANAG 2116, formally titled NATO Codes for Grades of Military Personnel.

Unteroffiziere mit Portepee

Unteroffizier(e) mit Portepee, also Portepeeunteroffizier(e) (en:

NCO(s) with sword knot" also "Sword knot NCO(s)"), is the designation for German senior NCO in the Armed forces of Germany. The name derives from earlier traditions in which senior enlisted men would carry a sword into battle. The word portepee derives from French port(e)-épée.

Any Portepeeunteroffizier of the former Prussian Army was entitled to wear (in addition to the dress uniform - to go with a ...) a "sword knot" to its personal sabre, which was originally restricted to officers only.The sequence of ranks (top-down approach) in that particular group is as follows:

OR-9: Oberstabsfeldwebel / Oberstabsbootsmann this rank was introduced by the Bundeswehr in 1983

OR-8: Stabsfeldwebel / Stabsbootsmann (in the Kriegsmarine Stabsoberbootsmann, Stabsobersteuermann, and Stabsobermaschinist)

OR-7: Hauptfeldwebel (Oberfähnrich)/ Hauptbootsmann (Oberfähnrich zur See), this rank was introduced by the Bundeswehr after being an assignment/ position of service (informally Spieß and officially now Kompaniefeldwebel in the Reichswehr, Wehrmacht, and National People's Army)

OR-6a: Oberfeldwebel / Oberbootsmann

OR-6b: Feldwebel / BootsmannRemark

The abbreviation "OR" stands for "Other Ranks / fr: sous-officiers et militaires du rang / ru:другие ранги, кроме офицероф"!

See also

⇒ Article: NCOs without portepee

⇒ Article: Ranks of the German Bundeswehr

⇒ Article: Rank insignia of the German Bundeswehr

⇒ Article: Ranks and insignia of NATO navies enlisted

And equivalents of the Navy—replacing Feldwebel with Bootsmann—and, historically, the Cavalry and Artillery (with Wachtmeister). The latter is not to be confused with the Navy's "Kompaniefeldwebel" of today which are also called Wachtmeister.

German non-commissioned officers were identified by the use of metallic lace (called Tresse) on the collar of the uniform jacket, as well as the edges of the shoulder straps. Senior non-commissioned officers in the Wehrmacht also used silver "stars" on the shoulder strap to differentiate between ranks; one star for a Feldwebel, two for an Oberfeldwebel, and three for a Stabsfeldwebel.

Veebel

Veebel is an Estonian military rank which has existed since the 20th century. The word veebel is derived from the German rank name of Feldwebel, and is usually, but incorrectly, translated into English as Sergeant. The official translation given by the Estonian Army is Warrant Officer, although the rank is equivalent to the British Army rank of Sergeant in the NATO code.

Navies Armies Air forces
Commissioned officers
Admiral of
the fleet
Field marshal or
General of the army
Marshal of
the air force
Admiral General Air chief marshal
Vice admiral Lieutenant general Air marshal
Rear admiral Major general Air vice-marshal
Commodore Brigadier or
brigadier general
Air commodore
Captain Colonel Group captain
Commander Lieutenant colonel Wing commander
Lieutenant
commander
Major or
commandant
Squadron leader
Lieutenant Captain Flight lieutenant
Lieutenant
junior grade
or
sub-lieutenant
Lieutenant or
first lieutenant
Flying officer
Ensign or
midshipman
Second lieutenant Pilot officer
Officer cadet Officer cadet Flight cadet
Enlisted grades
Warrant officer or
chief petty officer
Warrant officer or
sergeant major
Warrant officer
Petty officer Sergeant Flight sergeant
Leading seaman Corporal or
bombardier
Corporal
Seaman Private or
gunner or
trooper
Aircraftman or
airman
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