Randy Scarbery

Randy James Scarbery (born June 22, 1952) is a former professional baseball pitcher. He played in part of two seasons in the major leagues from 19791980 for the Chicago White Sox.

Randy Scarbery
Pitcher
Born: June 22, 1952 (age 67)
Fresno, California, U.S.
Batted: Switch Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 16, 1979, for the Chicago White Sox
Last MLB appearance
May 29, 1980, for the Chicago White Sox
MLB statistics
Win–Loss record3–10
Earned run average4.50
Strikeouts63
Teams

External links

1952 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1952 throughout the world.

1971 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament

The 1971 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1971 NCAA University Division baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its twenty-fifth year. Eight regional districts sent representatives to the College World Series with preliminary rounds within each district serving to determine each representative. These events would later become known as regionals. Each district had its own format for selecting teams, resulting in 23 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The twenty-fifth tournament's champion was Southern California, coached by Rod Dedeaux. The Most Outstanding Player was Jerry Tabb of Tulsa.

1971 USC Trojans baseball team

The 1971 USC Trojans baseball team represented the University of Southern California in the 1971 NCAA University Division baseball season. The team was coached Rod Dedeaux in his 30th season.

The Trojans won the College World Series, defeating the Southern Illinois Salukis in the championship game, winning their second of five consecutive national championships, and third in four years.

1972 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament

The 1972 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1972 NCAA University Division baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its twenty-sixth year. Eight regional districts sent representatives to the College World Series with preliminary rounds within each district serving to determine each representative. These events would later become known as regionals. Each district had its own format for selecting teams, resulting in 28 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The twenty-sixth tournament's champion was Southern California, coached by Rod Dedeaux. The Most Outstanding Player was Russ McQueen of the University of Southern California.

1972 USC Trojans baseball team

The 1972 USC Trojans baseball team represented the University of Southern California in the 1972 NCAA University Division baseball season. The team was coached Rod Dedeaux in his 31st season.

The Trojans won the College World Series, defeating the Arizona State Sun Devils in the championship game, winning their third of five consecutive national championships, and fourth in five years.

1973 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament

The 1973 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1973 NCAA University Division baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its twenty-seventh year. Eight regional districts sent representatives to the College World Series with preliminary rounds within each district serving to determine each representative. These events would later become known as regionals. Each district had its own format for selecting teams, resulting in 32 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The twenty-seventh tournament's champion was the University of Southern California, coached by Rod Dedeaux. The Most Outstanding Player was Dave Winfield of Minnesota. Winfield was the starting pitcher in two games, tossing 17​1⁄3 innings, allowing 9 hits, 1 earned run, and striking out 29. In addition, he batted .467 in the Series.

Southern California became the first team to win four consecutive College World Series.

1973 USC Trojans baseball team

The 1973 USC Trojans baseball team represented the University of Southern California in the 1973 NCAA University Division baseball season. The team was coached Rod Dedeaux in his 32nd season.

The Trojans won the College World Series, defeating the Arizona State Sun Devils in the championship game, winning their fourth of five consecutive national championships, and the fifth in six years.

1979 Caribbean Series

The twenty-second edition of the Caribbean Series (Serie del Caribe) was played in 1979. It was held from February 4 through February 9 with the champions teams from Dominican Republic (Aguilas Cibaeñas), Mexico (Mayos de Navojoa), Puerto Rico (Criollos de Caguas) and Venezuela (Navegantes del Magallanes). The format consisted of 12 games, each team facing the other teams twice. The games were played at Hiram Bithorn Stadium in San Juan, Puerto Rico, which boosted capacity to 18.000 seats.

1979 Chicago White Sox season

The 1979 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 80th season overall, and their 79th in Major League Baseball. They finished with a record 73-87, good enough for fifth place in the American League West, 15 games behind the first-place California Angels.

1979 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1979 throughout the world.

1980 California Angels season

The 1980 California Angels season involved the Angels finishing 6th in the American League West with a record of 65 wins and 95 losses.

1980 Chicago White Sox season

The 1980 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 80th season in Major League Baseball, and its 81st season overall. They finished with a record of 70-90, good enough for 5th place in the American League West, 26 games behind the first-place Kansas City Royals.

In 1979 and 1980, Bill Veeck made overtures to Denver interests. An agreement was reached to sell to Edward J. DeBartolo, Sr., who pledged to keep the club in Chicago. His offer was turned down by the owners. Veeck was forced to sell to a different investment group.

Chicago White Sox all-time roster

The following is a list of players and managers (*), both past and current, who appeared at least in one regular season game for the Chicago White Sox franchise.

Players in Bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Players in Italics have had their numbers retired by the team.

List of Houston Astros first-round draft picks

The Houston Astros, originally called the "Colt .45s", are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Houston, Texas. They play in the American League West division. Since the institution of Major League Baseball's Rule 4 Draft, the Astros have selected 56 players in the first round. Officially known as the "First-Year Player Draft", the Rule 4 Draft is Major League Baseball's primary mechanism for assigning amateur baseball players from high schools, colleges, and other amateur baseball clubs to its franchises. The draft order is determined based on the previous season's standings, and the team that had the worst record receives the first pick. In addition, teams which lost free agents in the previous off-season may be awarded compensatory or supplementary picks. The First-Year Player Draft is unrelated to the 1961 expansion draft in which the Astros initially filled their roster.

Of the 56 players picked in the first round by Houston, 24 have been pitchers, the most of any position; 21 of these were right-handed, while 3 were left-handed. Nine catchers were selected, while nine outfielders, nine shortstops, two first basemen, and two third basemen were taken as well. The team also selected one player at second base. Thirteen of the players came from high schools or universities in the state of California, while Texas and Tennessee follow with five and three players, respectively. They have also drafted two players from outside the United States: Carlos Correa (2012) and Ramón Castro (1994), both from Puerto Rico.The Astros won their first World Series title in 2017 with three of their first-round picks on the World Series roster—Correa, series MVP George Springer (2011), and Alex Bregman (2015). One Astros first-round pick is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. Craig Biggio (1987), who played his entire 20-season MLB career (1988–2007) with the Astros and became a member of the 3,000 hit club, was elected to the Hall in 2015. Carlos Correa is the only Astros first-round pick to have won a Rookie of the Year award, joining Jeff Bagwell (1991, originally drafted by the Red Sox) as the two Astros to win ROY. No Astros first round pick has won a Most Valuable Player award or Cy Young Award with the team. Brad Lidge (1998) won the Comeback Player of the Year Award in 2008 with the Philadelphia Phillies, his first season after leaving the Astros.The Astros have made 12 selections in the supplemental round of the draft. They have made the first overall selection in the draft five times; in 1976, 1992, 2012, 2013, and 2014. They have had 16 compensatory picks since the institution of the First-Year Player Draft in 1965. These additional picks are provided when a team loses a particularly valuable free agent in the prior off-season, or, more recently, if a team fails to sign a draft pick from the previous year. The Astros have failed to sign three of their first-round picks. First, pitcher Randy Scarbery (1970) did not sign though the Astros received no pick in compensation. John Burke (1991) and Brady Aiken (2014) also did not sign. The Astros were given the 37th pick of the 1992 draft and a pick in the 2015 draft in compensation.

List of Oakland Athletics first-round draft picks

The Oakland Athletics (the A's) are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Oakland, California. They play in the American League West division. The Athletics had played in Philadelphia from 1901 to 1954 and then Kansas City from 1955 to 1967 before moving to Oakland. Since the establishment of the Rule 4 Draft the Athletics have selected 77 players in the first round. Officially known as the "First-Year Player Draft", the Rule 4 Draft is MLB's primary mechanism for assigning players from high schools, colleges, and other amateur clubs to its franchises. The draft order is determined based on the previous season's standings, with the team possessing the worst record receiving the first pick. In addition, teams which lost free agents in the previous off-season may be awarded compensatory or supplementary picks.Of these 80 players, 36 have been pitchers, the most of any position; 27 of these were right-handed, while 9 were left-handed. Fifteen outfielders, including one center fielder, and 13 shortstops were selected. The A's have also drafted six catchers, five third basemen, four first basemen, and one second baseman in the first round. Additionally, 23 players came from high schools or universities in the A's home state of California, followed by 10 from Texas and Florida. They also drafted Ariel Prieto in 1995, who had defected from Cuba the year before. Prieto made his major league debut in 1995, one of 20 players in draft history to go directly to the majors without playing in the minor leagues.Three Athletics' first-round picks have won championships with the franchise. Reggie Jackson (1966) won World Series titles with the team in 1972, 1973, and 1974. Mark McGwire (1984) and Walt Weiss (1985) won with the 1989 championship team. Four A's first-round picks have gone on to win the Rookie of the Year Award: McGwire in 1987, Weiss in 1988, Ben Grieve (1994) in 1998, and Huston Street (2004) in 2005. Jackson also won a Most Valuable Player award in 1973, and Barry Zito (1999) won a Cy Young Award in 2002, making them the A's only picks to win these awards. Reggie Jackson, elected in 1993, is their only pick in the Baseball Hall of Fame. Although eligible McGwire has not been elected despite over 500 career home runs and briefly holding the single-season home run record (70). Some see McGwire's exclusion as a sign that the Hall is hesitant to elect players suspected of using performance-enhancing drugs as McGwire was suspected of steroid use (he later admitted his use in 2010). The Athletics have made nineteen selections in the supplemental round of the draft and have made the first overall selection once: in the first draft in 1965.The Athletics have failed to sign three first-round draft picks, although they did not receive a compensation pick for any of them. The first such player not signed was Pete Broberg in 1968. The A's also failed to sign both of their draft picks in 1979, Juan Bustabad and Mike Stenhouse. The Athletics have had ten compensatory picks overall since the first draft in 1965. These additional picks are provided when a team loses a particularly valuable free agent in the previous off-season, or, more recently, if a team fails to sign a draft pick from the previous year.

Todd Cruz

Todd Ruben Cruz (November 23, 1955 – September 2, 2008), was an American professional baseball shortstop and third baseman, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the Philadelphia Phillies, Kansas City Royals, California Angels, Chicago White Sox, Seattle Mariners, and Baltimore Orioles, between 1978 and 1984. He batted and threw right-handed.

USC Trojans baseball

The USC Trojans baseball program represents the University of Southern California in college baseball. Established in 1888, the team is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the Pac-12 Conference. USC home's field is Dedeaux Field, which is named in honor of former head coach and National College Baseball Hall of Fame inductee Rod Dedeaux.

The USC Trojans are one of the most successful programs in the history of college baseball. The Trojans have won more baseball national championships than any other program across all divisions of college baseball. With 12 national championships, USC is far and away the leader in that category; no other Division I school has more than six. As of June 30, 2018, USC also ranked fifth in all-time College World Series (CWS) appearances with 21, trailing only Texas (36), Miami (FL) (25), and Arizona State (22), and Florida State (22). The Trojans have won more individual CWS games (74) than any program but Texas (85). USC also ranked fourth in all-time NCAA Tournament wins with 173—trailing only Texas (240), Miami (192), and Florida State (192)—and eighth in total NCAA Tournament appearances with 37.The Trojans have compiled an all-time record of 2,884–1,685–28 (.630)—ranking fifth in all-time wins and 18th in all-time win percentage—and have captured outright or tied for 38 conference championships, as of the end of the 2018 season. USC's most notable baseball coach was Rod Dedeaux, who coached from 1942 from 1986 and led the school to 11 of its NCAA championships, including five straight from 1970 to 1974. The first Trojan national championship came in 1948. The 12th and most recent NCAA championship came in 1998.

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