Randy Cross

Randall Laureat Cross (born April 25, 1954) is a football analyst and former NFL right guard and center. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in July 2011.[1]

Randy Cross
refer to caption
Cross in 2013
No. 62, 51
Position:Offensive guard, Center
Personal information
Born:April 25, 1954 (age 65)
Brooklyn, New York
Career information
High school:Crespi Carmelite
(Encino, California)
College:UCLA
NFL Draft:1976 / Round: 2 / Pick: 42
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:185
Games started:180
Fumble recoveries:6
Player stats at NFL.com

High school years

Cross, who was born in Brooklyn, New York, attended Crespi Carmelite High School in Encino, California. He was renowned as a high school shot put champion in the Southern California CIF from 1970–72, when he was named CIF California State Meet champion in the event, defeating future world record holder Terry Albritton and future WWF wrestling star Jim Neidhart both from Newport Harbor High School in the process.[2]

He heaved the 12 pound high school shot 67' 6.5" which remains the Crespi school and stadium record.[3][4]

College career

At UCLA, Cross was an All-America selection. As a senior, he helped lead his team to the 1976 Rose Bowl championship over top-ranked Ohio State. Cross began his career as a Center, but was moved to Right Guard for his junior year before playing both Guard and Center as senior on a rare rotating nine man offensive line.[5]

On this rotating line Cross started at RG on the 1st unit and then moved to Center when the next group hit the field. He was named First-team All-America in 1975. He was also a First-team All-Conference selection in 1975 In his career, he was a starter in 28 of 34 career games including his final 23. Randy Cross (and many other UCLA linemen) also played collegiate rugby for the school. Randy was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2010.[6]

Professional career

In 1976, Cross was selected in the second-round of the NFL Draft by the San Francisco 49ers; his 13-year career included three Pro Bowl selections and three Super Bowl championships (SB XVI, XIX, XXIII). Cross' last game as a player was Super Bowl XXIII in 1989.

He played center from 1976–78 then guard from 1979–87 before finishing his career in San Francisco at center in 1988. Upon his retirement after Super Bowl XXIII, Randy joined the Miller Lite All Star's cast making a series of popular commercials for the brewing giant.

Broadcasting career

From 1989-1993, Cross was a member of the CBS Sports team that covered the NFC playoffs and Super Bowl XXVI. In addition, he served as an analyst for CBS Radio Sports' coverage of Super Bowl XXIV, filling in for Hank Stram when the latter was stricken with laryngitis and had to leave the broadcast in the third quarter of the game.[7]

Cross left CBS (following their loss of the NFC package to Fox) to join NBC Sports as a football analyst for NFL telecasts and a part-time analyst for Notre Dame football games. In 1998, he returned to CBS Sports as a game analyst before serving as a studio analyst on The NFL Today from 1999-2001. He eventually returned to his game analyst duties in 2002.

He also co-hosts shows on the Sirius NFL Radio. In 2009, he became the color analyst for US Naval Academy home games on CBS College Sports TV. He is the former lead color commentator for New England Patriots pre-season games, from 1995-2012, alongside Don Criqui. Randy was a co-host of the midday show "Rick and Randy" with Rick Kamla on WZGC 92-9 The Game a CBS radio station in Atlanta, Georgia before being released from the station.

Personal

Cross lives in Alpharetta, Georgia, with his wife, Patrice Cross, and their three children. Elder daughter Kelly graduated from University of Georgia and currently works for Levick Strategic Communications in Washington, D.C. She is married and has two daughters. Younger daughter Crystal recently graduated from Auburn University with a degree in BioMedical Science. His son, Brendan Cross, a graduate of Chattahoochee High School in Johns Creek, Georgia, played football for UCLA after transferring from Wake Forest University.[8]

Randy Cross's father, Dennis Cross (1924–1991), was an American actor, who had the lead role in the syndicated adventure series The Blue Angels (1960–61).

See also

References

  1. ^ Tillman, Howard elected to college Hall of Fame, Associated Press, May 27, 2010.
  2. ^ "California State Meet Results - 1915 to present". Hank Lawson. Retrieved December 25, 2012.
  3. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on July 23, 2011. Retrieved February 27, 2011.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on October 11, 2007. Retrieved September 28, 2007.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ "Registered & Protected by MarkMonitor". vault.sportsillustrated.cnn.com.
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on July 28, 2009. Retrieved April 14, 2009.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  7. ^ Nidetz, Steve (January 30, 1990). "In any language, this year's Super Bowl quickly became a colossal bore". Chicago Tribune. p. 4 (4).
  8. ^ "Wake Forest QB Brendan Cross transferring to UCLA". April 23, 2013.

External links

1981 All-Pro Team

The 1981 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1981. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. The Associated Press added a "nose tackle" position in 1981, joining Pro Football Weekly .

1984 All-Pro Team

The 1984 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News in 1984. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1984 the Pro Football Writers Association chose only one defensive tackle and two inside linebackers in a pure 3-4 format. Pro Football Weekly added a "Special Teams" player, a non-returner who excelled in special teams play.

1984 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1984 San Francisco 49ers season was their 39th season in the National Football League. The season was highlighted by their second Super Bowl victory. The franchise had their best season ever with a record of 15 wins and only 1 loss. Quarterback Joe Montana would be awarded the Super Bowl's Most Valuable Player Award for the second time in his career, joining Bart Starr and Terry Bradshaw as the only two time Super Bowl MVP's.

The 1984 49ers became the first team to win fifteen games in the NFL's regular season since the league went to a sixteen-game schedule in 1978. The 49ers, if not for their loss to the Steelers, would’ve become the 2nd team after the 1972 Miami Dolphins to complete a perfect season, and the Niners would’ve been the first to do so since the NFL expanded to a 16-game schedule.

The 1985 Chicago Bears, the 1998 Minnesota Vikings, the 2004 Pittsburgh Steelers, the 2011 Green Bay Packers, and the 2015 Carolina Panthers would later join the 1984 49ers to finish 15–1, although the 2007 New England Patriots would exceed this feat by finishing the regular season at an unbeaten 16–0. In the playoffs, the 49ers would pick up the 1 seed. They defeated the Giants 21-10 in the divisional round, then they shutout the Chicago Bears 23-0 and then defeated the Miami Dolphins 38-16 in Super Bowl XIX. This 49ers team has gone down as the best in franchise history and many call this season the best in Joe Montana's career.

1996 Buffalo Bills season

The 1996 Buffalo Bills season was their 37th in the league. The team matched their previous season's record of 10–6 and qualified for the playoffs, for the second consecutive season and eighth time in nine seasons. It was the final season for All-Pro QB Jim Kelly as he retired after the Playoff loss to the Jacksonville Jaguars.

1996 Denver Broncos season

The 1996 Denver Broncos season was the franchise's 27th season in the National Football League, and the 37th overall. The Broncos finished the season with 13 wins and 3 losses, winning the AFC West and earning the top seed in the AFC Playoffs. They were defeated, however, by a score of 30–27 by the 9–7 Jacksonville Jaguars in the Divisional round. John Elway says that the Jaguars loss was probably the most embarrassing loss of his career up to that point, because they were the top seeded team in the NFL and were favored to win the Super Bowl by many.

1997 Denver Broncos season

The 1997 Denver Broncos season was the franchise's 28th season in the National Football League, and the 38th overall. The Broncos finished the season with a record of 12–4, finishing second in the AFC West, and winning Super Bowl XXXII. The Broncos were the second team since the 1970 merger to win a Super Bowl (Oakland Raiders won in 1980) as a Wild Card team; the Kansas City Chiefs were an AFL wild card entrant who won the pre-merger Super Bowl IV in 1969.The 1997 season saw the new addition of the Denver Broncos' newest wordmark and logo. Their default colors were blue tops, blue pants and orange shoes. This would continue until 2012 when they assigned the all blue to the "Main Alternate" slot, replacing the primary uniforms with orange tops, white bottoms and orange/white shoes.

1997 New England Patriots season

The 1997 New England Patriots season was the franchise's 28th season in the National Football League and the 38th overall. They finished the season with a 10–6 record and a division title but lost in the playoffs to the Pittsburgh Steelers.

In January, when the Patriots were preparing to face the Green Bay Packers in Super Bowl XXXI, it was suspected head coach Bill Parcells was looking to move to another team after the game where he would have more say over personnel matters. In the 1996 NFL Draft, Parcells' relationship with owner Robert Kraft soured when Kraft selected wide receiver Terry Glenn against Parcells' wishes. After the Patriots' loss in Super Bowl XXXI, Parcells resigned from the Patriots, using the phrase "If they want you to cook the dinner, at least they ought to let you shop for some of the groceries." Due to an earlier renegotiation that had eliminated the 1997 season from Parcells' contract, NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue ruled Parcells could not be a head coach for another team in 1997. Parcells instead moved to the New York Jets as a "consultant", taking assistant head coach Bill Belichick with him to be the Jets' head coach; Kraft called this a "transparent farce" and accused the Jets of tampering with Parcells. The NFL ruled in the Patriots' favor and the Patriots received third and fourth-round picks in the 1997 NFL Draft, a second-round pick in the 1998 NFL Draft, and a first-round pick in the 1999 NFL Draft in compensation for allowing Parcells to become the Jets' head coach.Taking Parcells' place with the Patriots was Pete Carroll, who had coincidentally been the Jets' head coach in 1994. The Patriots began the season 5–1 but featured a 6–5 record later in the season. The Patriots managed to finish 10–6 and first in the AFC East for the second straight season. With the third seed in the AFC playoffs, the Patriots defeated the Miami Dolphins 17-3 in the Wild Card Game but were defeated by the Pittsburgh Steelers, 7–6, on the road the next week.

2014 Navy Midshipmen football team

The 2014 Navy Midshipmen football team represented the United States Naval Academy in the 2014 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Midshipmen were led by seventh year head coach Ken Niumatalolo and played their home games at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. The Midshipmen competed as an Independent. This was the final year as an Independent before the school joins the American Athletic Conference. They finished the season 8–5. They were invited to the Poinsettia Bowl where they defeated San Diego State.

2015 Navy Midshipmen football team

The 2015 Navy Midshipmen football team represented the United States Naval Academy in the 2015 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Midshipmen were led by eighth-year head coach Ken Niumatalolo and played their home games at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. The Midshipmen competed as a member of the Western Division of the American Athletic Conference, and were first year members of the conference. In their entire football history, this was the first season that Navy did not compete as an Independent. They finished the season 11–2, 7–1 in American Athletic play to finish in a tie for the Western Division title with Houston. However, due to their head to head loss to Houston, they did not represent the Western Division in the American Championship. They were invited to the Military Bowl where they defeated Pittsburgh.

2016 Navy Midshipmen football team

The 2016 Navy Midshipmen football team represented the United States Naval Academy in the 2016 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Midshipmen were led by ninth-year head coach Ken Niumatalolo and played their home games at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. The Midshipmen competed as a member of the West Division of the American Athletic Conference, and were second year members of the conference. They finished the season 9–5, 7–1 in American Athletic play to be champions of the West Division. They represented the West Division in The American Athletic Championship Game where they lost to Temple. They were invited to the Armed Forces Bowl where they lost to Louisiana Tech.

2018 Navy Midshipmen football team

The 2018 Navy Midshipmen football team represented the United States Naval Academy in the 2018 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Midshipmen were led by eleventh-year head coach Ken Niumatalolo and played their home games at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. Navy was a member of the American Athletic Conference (AAC) in the West Division.

The Midshipmen finished the season 3–10, the team's worst record since 2002. They went 2–6 in AAC play to finish in a tie for fifth place in the West Division.

Don Criqui

Don Criqui (born May 5, 1940) is an American television sportscaster.

He holds the record for longest-tenured broadcaster of one sports league in U.S. TV history, calling NFL football for 47 seasons (1967-2013) on NBC and CBS. Criqui's final NFL broadcast came on December 8, 2013, when he filled in for Bill Macatee as he was having traveling issues in a snow storm in Dallas, calling the 27-26 New England Patriots victory over the Cleveland Browns.Criqui's most recent network assignment was CBS Sports from 1998 until 2013, where he called the NFL, women's and men's college basketball and college football. From 1995 to 2012, he was the voice of New England Patriots pre-season football with Randy Cross.

From 2006 until 2017, Criqui served as the football radio play-by-play voice for Notre Dame, his alma mater.

List of AFC Championship Game broadcasters

The following is a list of the television and radio networks and announcers who have broadcast the American Football Conference Championship Game throughout the years. The years listed concentrate on the season instead of the calendar year that the game took place. The forerunner to the AFC Championship Game (prior to the 1970 AFL–NFL merger) was the AFL Championship Game.

List of NFL on CBS commentator pairings

CBS Sports began televising National Football League games in 1956. The network inherited the rights to games of most of the teams from the defunct DuMont Television Network; back then, each NFL team negotiated its own television deal. From 1956 to 1967, CBS assigned their commentating crews to one team each for the entire season. Beginning in 1968, CBS instituted a semi-merit system for their commentating crews. Following the 1993 season, there was no NFL on CBS after the network lost its half of the Sunday afternoon TV package (the National Football Conference) to the Fox Broadcasting Company. However, CBS gained the American Football Conference package from NBC beginning in 1998. The names of the play-by-play men are listed first while the color commentators are listed second; sideline reporters, when used, are listed last.

List of NFL on NBC commentator pairings

The first name that's slated is the play-by-play man while the color commentator or commentators are slated second and sideline reporters, if used, are slated last.

List of Sun Bowl broadcasters

The following is a list of the television networks and announcers who have broadcast college football's Sun Bowl throughout the years.

NFL Quarterback Club 99

NFL Quarterback Club '99 released in November 1998, developed by Iguana Entertainment and published by Acclaim Entertainment for Nintendo 64, is one of the first sports games to work with the Expansion Pak. The game features the ability to replay past Super Bowls and provides historical descriptions of them. NFL Quarterback Club '99 delivers all 31 teams and 3D rendered stadiums (the Cleveland Browns can only be accessed by using a cheat code). 1,500 players are featured in the game with over 250 motion-capture animations. Players, along with teams, uniforms, coaches, and playbooks can also be created and used in game. Play-by-play is handled by Randy Cross and Mike Patrick while the artificial intelligence was developed by coach Charlie Weis.

The graphics of the game are high resolution, with the optional expansion pak and rumble pak. The expansion pak only makes replays longer and slightly improves overall performance.

Current
Former

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