Ramsar Convention

The Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance especially as Waterfowl Habitat is an international treaty for the conservation and sustainable use of wetlands.[2] It is also known as the Convention on Wetlands. It is named after the city of Ramsar in Iran, where the Convention was signed in 1971.

Every three years, representatives of the Contracting Parties meet as the Conference of the Contracting Parties (COP), the policy-making organ of the Convention which adopts decisions (Resolutions and Recommendations) to administer the work of the Convention and improve the way in which the Parties are able to implement its objectives.[3] COP12 was held in Punta del Este, Uruguay, in 2015. COP13 was held in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, in October 2018.

Upper Navua Ramsar Site, Fiji
The Upper Navua Conservation Area Ramsar Site in Fiji
Wise use
Sustainable fishing in India, an example of wise use.
Ramsar Convention
Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance especially as Waterfowl Habitat
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Ramsar logo
Signed2 February 1971
LocationRamsar (Iran)
Effective21 December 1975
ConditionRatification by 7 states
Parties170[1]
DepositaryDirector General of UNESCO
LanguagesEnglish, French and Spanish
www.ramsar.org

List of Wetlands of International Importance (the "Ramsar List")

Archipel Bolama-Bijagos Ramsar Site in Guinea-Bissau
Archipel Bolama-Bijagos Ramsar Site in Guinea-Bissau

The List of Wetlands of International Importance included 2,331 Ramsar Sites in May 2018 covering over 2.1 million square kilometres (810,000 sq mi). The country with the highest number of Sites is the United Kingdom with 170, and the country with the greatest area of listed wetlands is Bolivia, with over 140,000 square kilometres (54,000 sq mi).[4]

The Ramsar Sites Information Service (RSIS) is a searchable database which provides information on each Ramsar Site. [5]

International cooperation

Ramsar transboundary Site Wadden Sea
Wadden Sea is a Transboundary Ramsar Site covering 13 Ramsar sites in Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands

As of 2016 there are 18 Transboundary Ramsar Sites, and 15 Ramsar Regional Initiatives covering regions of the Mediterranean, Asia, Africa and South America.

International organization partners

The Ramsar Convention works closely with six other organisations known as International Organization Partners (IOPs). These are:

These organizations support the work of the Convention by providing expert technical advice, helping implement field studies, and providing financial support. The IOPs also participate regularly as observers in all meetings of the Conference of the Parties and as full members of the Scientific and Technical Review Panel.

Other partners

The Convention collaborates with a network of partners:

Bodies established by the Convention

Conference of contracting Parties (COP)

This is the Convention's governing body consisting of all governments that have ratified the treaty. This ultimate authority reviews progress under the Convention, identifies new priorities, and sets work plans for members. The COP can also make amendments to the Convention, create expert advisory bodies, review progress reports by member nations, and collaborate with other international organizations and agreements.

The Standing Committee

The Standing Committee is the intersessional executive body which represents the COP between its triennial meetings, within the framework of the decisions made by the COP. The Contracting Parties that are members of the Standing Committee are elected by each meeting of the COP to serve for the three years until the next one.

Ramsar Convention
The Ramsar Secretariat offices in Gland, Switzerland

The Scientific and Technical Review Panel (STRP)

The Scientific and Technical Review Panel provides scientific and technical guidance to the Conference of the Parties, the Standing Committee, and the Ramsar Secretariat.

The Secretariat

The Secretariat carries out the day-to-day coordination of the Convention’s activities. It is based at the headquarters of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) in Gland, Switzerland.

The implementation of the Ramsar Convention is a continuing partnership between the Contracting Parties, the Standing Committee, and the Convention Secretariat, with the advice of the subsidiary expert body, the Scientific and Technical Review Panel (STRP), and the support of the International Organization Partners (IOPs).

Martha Rojas Urrego is the sixth Secretary General of the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands.

World Wetlands Day

World Wetlands Day
A wetland clean-up in Oman on World Wetlands Day

The 2nd of February each year is World Wetlands Day, marking the date of the adoption of the Convention on Wetlands on 2 February 1971. Established to raise awareness about the value of wetlands for humanity and the planet, WWD was celebrated for the first time in 1997 and has grown remarkably since then. In 2015 World Wetlands Day was celebrated in 59 countries.

See also

References

  1. ^ "The Ramsar Convention enters into force for the Democratic People's Republic of Korea". Ramsar Convention Secretariat. 16 May 2018. Retrieved 26 December 2018.
  2. ^ "The Ramsar Convention and its Mission". Archived from the original on 9 April 2016. Retrieved 11 October 2016.
  3. ^ "The Conference of the Contracting Parties". RAMSAR. Retrieved 31 March 2019.
  4. ^ "Ramsar Sites Information Service".
  5. ^ Using the Ramsar Sites Information Service.

External links

A Directory of Important Wetlands in Australia

A Directory of Important Wetlands in Australia (DIWA) is a list of wetlands of national importance to Australia. Intended to augment the list of wetlands of international importance under the Ramsar Convention, it was formerly published in report form, but is now essentially an online publication. Wetlands that appear in the Directory are commonly referred to as "DIWA wetlands" or "Directory wetlands".

Banrock Station Wetland Complex

Banrock Station Wetland Complex is a wetland complex located in South Australia which has been recognised as being of international importance by designation under the Ramsar Convention. It was listed on 21 October 2002 as Ramsar site 1221. It lies in the Riverland region of south-eastern South Australia and is adjacent to the Murray River. It is a floodplain wetland subject to an ongoing environmental restoration program by a commercial organisation which manages the wetlands and promotes ecologically sustainable land use practices. In 2002 Banrock Station Wines received the Ramsar Wetland Conservation Award in recognition of its conservation efforts.

Flood Plain Lower Ringarooma River wetlands

The Flood Plain Lower Ringarooma River wetlands is a wetland site comprises the floodplain of the lower Ringarooma River in north-eastern Tasmania, Australia. In 1982 it was designated a wetland of international importance under the Ramsar Convention.

Gotjawal Forest

Gotjawal Forest is a naturally formed forest located on the middle slopes of Halla Mountain, Jeju Island in South Korea. It covers the rocky area of ʻaʻā on Jeju Island off the southwestern coast of South Korea. Due to the geographical feature, the region remains largely undisturbed by people. The Gotjawal Forest is an enclave of the Southern Korea evergreen forests ecoregion, and is a favorite place of the Jeju locals.

Hacks Lagoon Conservation Park

Hacks Lagoon Conservation Park is a protected area in the Australian state of South Australia located in the locality of Bool Lagoon about 24 kilometres (15 miles) south of the municipal seat of Naracoorte.The conservation park consists of land in sections 249, 372, 373, 379, 382, and 383 of the cadastral unit of the Hundred of Robertson. The land acquired protected area status on 8 June 1967 simultaneously as a fauna reserve declared under the Fauna Conservation Act, 1964-1965 and as a Fauna Conservation Reserve under the Crown Lands Act, 1929-1967 along with land in sections 223 and 224. On 27 April 1972, land in section 249 was reconstituted as the Hacks Lagoon Conservation Park under the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972. In 1985, the area covered by both the conservation park and the adjoining Bool Lagoon Game Reserve was added under the name "Bool and Hacks Lagoons" to the List of Wetlands of International Importance maintained by the Ramsar Convention. Land in sections 373, 379, 382 and 383 was added to the conservation park on 27 August 1992.The conservation park is classified as an IUCN Category IV protected area. In 1980, it was listed on the now-defunct Register of the National Estate.

Hosnies Spring

Hosnies Spring formerly Hosnie’s Spring or Hosnies Springs) is a wetland on Christmas Island, an Australian external territory in the eastern Indian Ocean. It has been recognised as being of international importance by designation under the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands.

Interlaken Lakeside Reserve

The Interlaken Lakeside Reserve is a wetland reserve at subalpine Interlaken, lying at the north-western end of Lake Crescent on the Interlaken isthmus between the reservoirs of Lakes Sorell and Crescent, about 20 km west of Tunbridge, in the Central Highlands of Tasmania, Australia. In 1982 it was designated a wetland of international importance under the Ramsar Convention.

Jocks Lagoon

Jocks Lagoon is an 18-hectare (44-acre) freshwater coastal lagoon in north-eastern Tasmania, Australia. In 1982 it was designated a wetland of international importance under the Ramsar Convention.

Kolleru Lake

Kolleru Lake is one of the largest freshwater lakes in India located in state of Andhra Pradesh and forms the largest shallow freshwater lake in Asia, 15 kilometers away from the city of Eluru. Kolleru is located between Krishna and Godavari deltas. Kolleru spans into two districts – Krishna and West Godavari. The lake is fed directly by water from the seasonal Budameru and Tammileru streams, and is connected to the Krishna and Godavari irrigation systems by over 67 major and minor irrigation canals. This lake is a major tourist attraction. Many birds migrate here in winter, such as Siberian crane, ibis, and painted storks. The lake was an important habitat for an estimated 20 million resident and migratory birds, including the grey or spot-billed pelican (Pelecanus philippensis). The lake was declared as a wildlife sanctuary in November 1999 under India's Wildlife Protection Act of 1972, and designated a wetland of international importance in November 2002 under the international Ramsar Convention. The wildlife sanctuary covers an area of 308 km2.

Kolleru Lake under Ramsar Convention (allowing local communities (Here: Vaddi Community) to continue their occupation of culture fish and caught fish) covers 90,100 hectares (222,600 acres) and Kolleru Lake under Wildlife Sanctuary covers 166,000 acres (67,200 ha)

Lake Albacutya

Lake Albacutya is a eutrophic lake located in the Wimmera region of Victoria, Australia. It is one of a series of terminal lakes on the Wimmera River, which form the largest land-locked drainage system in Victoria. Lake Albacutya is designated as a wetland of international importance under the Ramsar Convention.

List of Ramsar sites in the Philippines

The Ramsar Convention (formally, the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance, especially as Waterfowl Habitat) is an international treaty for the conservation and sustainable utilization of wetlands, recognizing the fundamental ecological functions of wetlands and their economic, cultural, scientific, and recreational value. It is named after the city of Ramsar in Iran, where the Convention was signed in 1971.

The Philippines enforced the Ramsar Convention in its whole territory on November 8, 1994. Since then, Ramsar has designated 7 Ramsar sites in the country. Two Ramsar sites in the Philippines have been declared by UNESCO as world heritage sites, namely Puerto Princesa Subterranean River National Park, and Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park.A national inventory of wetland resources, based on the best scientific information available, is mandated by the Convention since 1990 through Recom 4.6. A Framework for Wetland Inventory was also established by the Convention in 2002 to aid member states in establishing their own national inventory for wetland sites. The inventory makes it possible to prioritize appropriate wetland sites for designation on the Ramsar List, similar to the tentative list of UNESCO, where UNESCO sites must always come from the tentative list. There is currently no publicly disclosed wetland inventory in the Philippines, but it is assumed that such inventory exists as the Philippines, through the Department of Environment and Natural Resources, has already nominated at least seven Philippine wetlands since 1994.

The current representation of the Philippines in Ramsar wetland nominations is inactive compared with the Ramsar wetland nominations of its peers. By comparison, the Philippines has 7 sites, while Mexico has more than 140, the archipelagic country of Japan has more than 50, the African nation of Algeria has more than 50, and the small country of South Korea has 22. The Philippines, an archipelagic country, theoretically possesses more wetlands than South Korea and North Korea combined. This has prompted various scholars to push the government to participate more in the nominations of Philippine wetlands in the Ramsar Convention. By rule, the Philippines may nominate multiple sites as Ramsar sites like what Mexico did in 2008, where at least 45 of its nominated sites were specifically declared as new Ramsar sites.

List of Ramsar wetland sites in Pakistan

The Ramsar Convention on Wetland Protection has been signed in Ramsar, Iran in 1971.

As of March 2013, there are nineteen Ramsar sites, covering an area of 1,343,627 hectares (3,320,170 acres) in Pakistan.

List of parties to the Ramsar Convention

This is a list of parties contracting to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance especially as Waterfowl Habitat, which is also known as the Convention on Wetlands. The Convention's mission is "“the conservation and wise use of all wetlands through local and national actions and international cooperation, as a contribution towards achieving sustainable development throughout the world”. It calls upon contracting parties to recognize the interdependence of humans and the environment as well as the ecological functions of wetlands, such as wildlife habitat, nutrient cycling, and flood control.

The Ramsar Convention is the oldest multilateral international conservation convention and the only one to deal with one habitat or ecosystem type, wetlands. The Convention's headquarters are in Gland, Switzerland, and it works closely with the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.The Convention was held in the city of Ramsar, Iran in February 1971 and was originally contracted by seven countries when it came into force on 21 December 1975. As of February 2018 there are 170 contracting parties and over 2,000 designated sites covering over 200,000,000 hectares (490,000,000 acres). Every contracting country has at least one Ramsar site, and 31 of the contracting countries have only one site. The country with the most sites is the United Kingdom with 170. To become a Ramsar site, a site must be nominated by a contracting country, meet at least one of nine criteria, and undergo scientific review. The Convention was most recently ratified by North Korea in 2018.

The table lists the countries contracting to the convention, the entry date of each country to the convention, the number of Ramsar sites in each country, and the total area of all Ramsar sites in each country.

Little Waterhouse Lake

Little Waterhouse Lake is a freshwater coastal lagoon in the Waterhouse Conservation Area of north-eastern Tasmania, Australia. In 1982 it was designated a wetland of international importance under the Ramsar Convention.

Ramsar

Ramsar may refer to:

Ramsar, Mazandaran, city in Iran

Ramsar, Rajasthan, village in India

Ramsar Convention, an international convention on wetlands signed in Ramsar, Iran

Ramsar site, a wetland listed under the Ramsar Convention

Ramsar site

A Ramsar site is a wetland site designated to be of international importance under the Ramsar Convention.The Convention on Wetlands, known as the Ramsar Convention, is an intergovernmental environmental treaty established in 1971 by UNESCO, which came into force in 1975. It provides for national action and international cooperation regarding the conservation of wetlands, and wise sustainable use of their resources.Ramsar identifies wetlands of international importance, especially those providing waterfowl habitat.

As of 2016, there were 2,231 Ramsar sites, protecting 214,936,005 hectares (531,118,440 acres), and 169 national governments are currently participating.

Western District Lakes

The Western District Lakes of Victoria, in the Western District of Victoria, south-eastern Australia, were recognised on 15 December 1982 as wetlands of international importance by listing under the Ramsar Convention, as Ramsar site no.268.

Wetland classification

Classification of wetlands has been a problematical task, with the commonly accepted definition of what constitutes a wetland being among the major difficulties. A number of national wetland classifications exist. In the 1970s, the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance introduced a first attempt to establish an internationally acceptable wetland classification scheme.

Generally
Classification systems
Organizations
Aquatic ecosystems

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