Ralph Terry

Ralph Willard Terry (born January 9, 1936) is an American former right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. Terry is perhaps best known as the MVP of the 1962 World Series, and for giving up the walk-off home run to Bill Mazeroski that enabled the Pittsburgh Pirates to win the 1960 World Series.

Ralph Terry
Ralph Terry
Pitcher
Born: January 9, 1936 (age 83)
Big Cabin, Oklahoma
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 6, 1956, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
April 14, 1967, for the New York Mets
MLB statistics
Win–loss record107–99
Earned run average3.62
Strikeouts1,000
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early life

Terry was born in Big Cabin, Oklahoma and attended Chelsea High School (Oklahoma) and Missouri State University.[1]

Career

Independence Indians (1953)

Terry played for the Independence Indians in the Ban Johnson League in 1953. The home field for the Independence Indians was Shulthis Stadium in Independence, Kansas. The stadium is the same one that Mickey Mantle started his career at with the Independence Yankees in 1949.[2]

New York Yankees (1956–1957)

Terry made his major league debut in 1956, going 1-2 in three games played in his rookie season. The following year, he appeared in seven games, making two starts, before being traded to the Kansas City Athletics on June 15.[3]

Kansas City Athletics (1957–1959)

Terry finished the 1957 season 4-11 in 19 starts for the Athletics. He rebounded somewhat the next season, going 11-13 in 40 games, including 33 starts. In 1959, he started 2-4 with a 5.24 ERA in 9 games. On May 26 of that year, he was traded to the New York Yankees along with Hector Lopez.[4]

Return to New York and stardom (1959–1964)

Upon his return, Terry went 3-7 with a 3.39 ERA in 24 games, including 16 starts. His career began to take off in 1960, when he posted a 10-8 record and 3.40 ERA. That year, he made his first postseason appearance, in two games of the 1960 World Series. He was 0-2 with a 5.40 ERA in the two games, one start and one relief appearance, and gave up Bill Mazeroski's walk-off home run in Game Seven.[5]

In 1961, Terry posted a 16-3 record with a 3.15 ERA in 31 games (27 starts). In the 1961 World Series, he was 0-1 with a 4.82 ERA in two starts, but won his first championship when the Yankees defeated the Cincinnati Reds in five games.

For 1962, Terry went 23-12 with a 3.19 ERA. That year, he posted career bests with 23 wins, 39 starts, 298.2 innings pitched, and 176 strikeouts against 57 walks. His 23 victories led the American League. In the 1962 World Series, he went 2-1 with a 1.80 ERA and 16 strikeouts in 25 innings over three games against the San Francisco Giants. His performance earned him the World Series MVP award that season.[6][7]

The next year, Terry was 17-15 with a 3.22 ERA in 37 games, including a career-high 18 complete games. He pitched three innings in the 1963 World Series against the Dodgers, finishing with a 3.00 ERA, as the Yankees were swept in four games.[8]

In 1964, Terry went 7-11 with a 4.54 ERA. In the 1964 World Series against the Cardinals, he gave up two hits and struck out three batters as the Yankees lost. On October 21, Terry was traded to the Cleveland Indians as a player to be named later for Pedro Ramos.[9]

Cleveland Indians (1965)

In his only season in Cleveland, Terry posted an 11–6 with a 3.69 ERA in 30 games, (26 starts). On April 6, 1966 he was traded to the Kansas City Athletics for John O'Donoghue and cash.[10]

Kansas City Athletics (1966)

Terry started 15 games for the Athletics in 1966, where he went 1–5 with a 3.80 ERA. On August 6, his contract was purchased by the New York Mets.

New York Mets (1966–1967)

With the Mets in 1966, Terry went 0-1 with a 4.74 ERA in 11 games, six as a reliever. In 1967, Terry pitched in just two games, and finished one, before being released on May 16. He subsequently retired.

Career overview

In his career, Terry had 257 games started, 75 games finished, 20 shutouts, 11 saves, and 446 bases on balls in 1,849.1 innings pitched.

In five World Series (1960–64), Terry posted a record of 2–3, 31 strikeouts and a 2.93 ERA. Both wins came in the 1962 World Series against the San Francisco Giants, including a 1–0 shutout in Game 7 over Giant ace Jack Sanford. That game—and thus the Series—ended with Yankee second baseman Bobby Richardson catching Willie McCovey's line drive.

Post-retirement

After baseball, Terry became a professional golfer. He won the 1980 Midwest PGA Championship and based on his status as a PGA of America sectional champion, he qualified for and played in four PGA Tour events in 1981 and 1982. In 1986, he started playing on the Senior PGA Tour. His best finish was a tie for 10th at the 1989 Showdown Classic. He often appears at Yankees' Old-Timers' Day.

Terry has for several years, lived in Larned, Kansas, where he was in the insurance business for a number of years and is now retired and still golfs as a hobby.

See also

References

  1. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/t/terryra01.shtml
  2. ^ Sumner, Jan (2015). Independence, Mantle, and Miss Able (First ed.). Jadan Publishing. pp. 51–61. ISBN 978-0-9703197-1-5.
  3. ^ http://www.brainyhistory.com/events/1957/june_15_1957_119117.html
  4. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/t/terryra01.shtml
  5. ^ http://www.baseball-almanac.com/ws/10131960.shtml
  6. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/t/terryra01.shtml
  7. ^ http://m.mlb.com/postseason/history/1962
  8. ^ 1963 World Series
  9. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/t/terryra01.shtml
  10. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/t/terryra01.shtml

External links

1957 Kansas City Athletics season

The 1957 Kansas City Athletics season, the third for the team in Kansas City and the 57th in MLB, involved the A's finishing seventh in the American League with a record of 59 wins and 94 losses, 38½ games behind the American League Champion New York Yankees. The club drew 901,067 spectators, sixth in the league.

1957 New York Yankees season

The 1957 New York Yankees season was the 55th season for the team in New York, and its 57th season overall. The team finished with a record of 98–56 to win their 23rd pennant, finishing eight games ahead of the Chicago White Sox. New York was managed by Casey Stengel. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

In the World Series, the Yankees were defeated by the Milwaukee Braves in seven games. They lost the crucial seventh game in Yankee Stadium to the starting pitcher for the Braves, Lew Burdette, who was selected the World Series Most Valuable Player based on this and his other two victories in the Series.

Phil Rizzuto, the former team shortstop from the early 50s, joined the broadcast team for the radio and television broadcasts taking over from Jim Woods in what would be the first of many seasons as a Yankees broadcaster.

1958 Kansas City Athletics season

The 1958 Kansas City Athletics season was the team's fourth in Kansas City and the 58th in the American League. The season involved the A's finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 73 wins and 81 losses, 19 games behind the World Champion New York Yankees.

1959 Kansas City Athletics season

The 1959 Kansas City Athletics season was the fifth for the franchise in Kansas City, and its 59th overall. It involved the A's finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 66 wins and 88 losses, 28 games behind the AL Champion Chicago White Sox.

1959 New York Yankees season

The 1959 New York Yankees season was the 57th season for the team in New York and its 59th overall. The team finished in third place in the American League with a record of 79–75, 15 games behind the Chicago White Sox. New York was managed by Casey Stengel. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

1960 World Series

The 1960 World Series was played between the Pittsburgh Pirates of the National League (NL) and the New York Yankees of the American League (AL) from October 5 to 13, 1960. It is most notable for the Game 7, ninth-inning home run hit by Bill Mazeroski, the first time a winner-take-all World Series game has ended with a walk-off home run.

Despite losing the series, the Yankees scored 55 runs, the most runs scored by any one team in World Series history, a unique record, and more than twice as many as the Pirates, who scored 27 runs. The Yankees won three blowout games (16–3, 10–0, and 12–0), while the Pirates won four close games (6–4, 3–2, 5–2, and 10–9) to win the series. The Series MVP was Bobby Richardson of the Yankees, the only time in history that the award has been given to a member of the losing team.

This World Series featured seven past, present, or future league Most Valuable Players. The Pirates had two – Dick Groat (1960) and Roberto Clemente (1966) – while the Yankees had five: Yogi Berra (1951, 1954, 1955), Bobby Shantz (1952), Mickey Mantle (1956, 1957, 1962), Roger Maris (1960, 1961), and Elston Howard (1963).

As noted in the superstition called the "Ex-Cub Factor", this was the only Series after 1945 and until 2001 in which a team with three or more former members of the Chicago Cubs (Don Hoak, Smoky Burgess, and Gene Baker) was able to win a World Series.

The World Championship for the Pirates was their third overall and first since 1925.

1962 Major League Baseball season

The 1962 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 9 to October 16, 1962. The National League played a 162-game schedule for the first time, having added the Houston Colt .45s and the New York Mets as expansion teams. The American League had played its first 162-game schedule a year earlier.

The NL returned to New York City after a four-year absence, though the Mets would finish in last place.

The National League went to a tie-breaker series to decide the Pennant winner won by the San Francisco Giants over the Los Angeles Dodgers 2 games to 1.

In the World Series the New York Yankees defeated the San Francisco Giants 4 games to 3.

1962 New York Yankees season

The 1962 New York Yankees season was the 60th season for the team in New York, and its 62nd season overall. The team finished with a record of 96–66, winning their 27th pennant, finishing 5 games ahead of the Minnesota Twins. New York was managed by Ralph Houk. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the San Francisco Giants in 7 games. It was their 20th World Championship in franchise history, and their last until 1977.

1962 World Series

The 1962 World Series matched the defending American League and World Series champions New York Yankees against the National League champion San Francisco Giants. It is best remembered for its dramatic conclusion; with runners on second and third and two out in the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 7, Hall-of-Famer Willie McCovey hit an exceptionally hard line drive that was caught by second baseman Bobby Richardson to preserve a one-run victory for the Yankees.

The Giants had won their first NL pennant since 1954 and first since moving from New York in 1958. They advanced by defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers in a three-game playoff. The Giants had a higher cumulative batting average (.226-.199) and lower earned-run average (2.66-2.95), had more hits (51-44), runs (21-20), hit more home runs (5-3), triples (2-1) and doubles (10-6), yet lost the Series. They would not return to the Fall Classic for another 27 years.

The Yankees took the Series in seven games for the 20th championship in team history. The Yankees had won their first World Series in 1923; of the 40 Series played between 1923 and 1962, the Yankees won half. After a long dominance of the World Series picture, the Yankees would not win another World Series for another 15 years despite appearances in 1963, 1964, and 1976.

This World Series, which was closely matched in every game, is also remembered for its then-record length of 13 days, caused by postponements due to rain in both cities.

1965 Cleveland Indians season

The 1965 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the American League with a record of 87–75, 15 games behind the Minnesota Twins. The Indians played .500 ball for the first 40 games, then eventually heated up going on a 10-game winning streak at one point improving their record to 37-24. They would peak at 46-28, but would cool off significantly after the all star break (going 41-47 the rest of the way) and would only spend six days in first place. Still, the Indians 87-75 record would be the best win-loss record they would post between 1959 and 1994. This season also marked the return of Rocky Colavito. This led to an increase in attendance (a season after the Indians almost left Cleveland, due to low attendance). The trade itself ended up being a disaster in the long run, even though it was successful short term (for one season). The Indians were the only team to win the regular season series vs the AL pennant winning Twins (who would lose to the Dodgers in 7 games in the 1965 World Series).

1966 Kansas City Athletics season

The 1966 Kansas City Athletics season was the twelfth and penultimate season in Kansas City, and the 66th in overall franchise history. It involved the A's finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 74 wins and 86 losses, 23 games behind the World Champion Baltimore Orioles. Paid attendance for the season was 773,929. The pitching staff had an earned run average of 3.56, which ranked sixth in the American League.

1966 New York Mets season

The 1966 New York Mets season was the fifth regular season for the Mets. They went 66–95 and finished 9th in the NL. They were managed by Wes Westrum. They played home games at Shea Stadium.

1966 marked the first season in which the Mets avoided a last place finish, as well as the first time they did not lose at least 100 games.

1967 New York Mets season

The 1967 New York Mets season was the sixth regular season for the Mets. They went 61–101 and finished 10th in the National League, 40½ games behind the NL pennant and World Series Champion St. Louis Cardinals. They were managed by Wes Westrum and Salty Parker. They played home games at Shea Stadium.

Art Ditmar

Arthur John Ditmar (born April 3, 1929) is a former starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Athletics (Philadelphia, 1954 - Kansas City, 1955–56, 1961–62) and the New York Yankees (1957–1961). He batted and threw right-handed and was listed at 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) tall and 185 pounds (84 kg). Born in Winthrop, Massachusetts, he grew up in the Berkshire County city of Pittsfield, where he graduated from high school.A finesse control pitcher, Ditmar divided his career between the Athletics and Yankees. Ditmar won 47 games for the Yankees in a span of five years, with a career-high 15 in 1960, despite not getting to pitch on a regular basis in a rotation that included Whitey Ford, Bobby Shantz, Don Larsen and Bob Turley. In a nine-season career, Ditmar compiled a 72–77 record with 552 strikeouts and a 3.98 ERA in 1,268.0 innings.

Ditmar defeated the Yankees 8–6, when the Athletics played their last game at Shibe Park in Philadelphia before moving to Kansas City. In the same game, Yankees regular catcher Yogi Berra played his only game at third base in his career, and teammate Mickey Mantle appeared at shortstop (September 26, 1954). Ditmar started and lost both Game 1 and Game 5 of the 1960 World Series for the Yankees, lasting only one-third of an inning in Game 1 and 1 and one-third inning in Game 5.

After a Budweiser television commercial of the 1980s incorporated the original radio broadcast of the 1960 World Series Game 7, with announcer Chuck Thompson incorrectly naming Ditmar instead of Ralph Terry as the pitcher off whom Bill Mazeroski hit his legendary home run, Ditmar sued Anheuser-Busch for $500,000, contending his reputation was tarnished.

Jack Sanford

John Stanley Sanford (May 18, 1929 – March 7, 2000) was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball, and later in his career a relief pitcher as well, for the Philadelphia Phillies, San Francisco Giants, and California Angels. He finished his career playing very briefly with the Kansas City Athletics.

Sanford was born in Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts. He won the National League's Rookie of the Year award in 1957 with the Phillies for a season with outstanding numbers. That year, he was 19-8 with a 3.08 ERA in 33 starts. He had 15 complete games on the season, including three shutouts. Impressively, he also finished the season with 188 strikeouts, which led the league.

His next seven years would be extremely solid, but never quite as impressive as his rookie season; or according to some, he never improved much after it. After being traded to the Giants for the 1959 season, Sanford went 15-12 with a 3.16 ERA in 222​1⁄3 innings pitched and completed 10 games. That year, he started 31 games and made 36 appearances, 5 out of the bullpen.

Sanford's best bid for a Cy Young Award came in 1962 when he finished 24-7 with a 3.43 ERA for a very good Giants team. He won 16 consecutive decisions from mid-June to mid-September and was named Player of the Month in August for his second straight 6-0 month (he also posted a 3.55 ERA, and 31 SO). Sanford led the Giants to the NL pennant and a chance to face the New York Yankees in the World Series. It was the only time he would get to play in the postseason, but the Giants lost to the Yankees after Sanford lost Game 7, 1-0 to Ralph Terry. (The Giants lost the Series by inches: Yankee second baseman Bobby Richardson caught Willie McCovey's line drive with Willie Mays on second and Matty Alou on third; a foot or two to either side and both runners would have scored and the Giants would have won the Series.) But his statistics in the Series were outstanding. He had a 1.93 ERA with 23​1⁄3 innings pitched and allowed only 16 hits. He had 19 strikeouts and only a 1-2 record due to lack of run support. He would also fall short of a Cy Young Award that year, coming in second in the voting to Don Drysdale.

After he left the Giants, his best seasons were behind him. He ended his career on August 6, 1967 with Kansas City. In his career, he posted a solid 137-101 record with a 3.69 overall ERA in 2049​1⁄3 innings pitched. He pitched in 388 games (293 starts), accumulated 1182 strikeouts and gave up only 840 earned runs. He also finished in the Top 10 in MVP Award voting twice in his career (1957, 1962). He finished 2nd in the league in wins twice, losing in 1957 to only Warren Spahn and in 1962 to Cy Young Award winner Don Drysdale.

Sanford died of a brain tumor at age 70 in Beckley, West Virginia.

Jerry Lumpe

Jerry Dean Lumpe (June 2, 1933 – August 15, 2014) was a Major League Baseball second baseman for the New York Yankees (1956–59), Kansas City Athletics (1959–63) and Detroit Tigers (1964–67).Lumpe was a member of the 1958 World Series championship team, appearing in six games for the Yankees. He started three of them at third base, including the decisive Game 7 victory over the Milwaukee Braves. He also played for New York in the previous year's World Series, won in seven games by the Braves.

He was traded on May 26, 1959 by the Yankees along with pitchers Johnny Kucks and Tom Sturdivant to the Kansas City A's in exchange for outfielder Hector Lopez and pitcher Ralph Terry.

Late in his career, in his first season with Detroit, he was named to the 1964 American League All-Star team.

Lumpe was raised in Warsaw, Missouri. He and future Yankee teammate Norm Siebern had been basketball players together for Missouri State University, when the school was known as Southwest Missouri State, where they won two NAIA Championships in 1952 and 1953, although both needed to miss some tournament games to report to baseball spring training camp. Lumpe maintained strong ties to the university and died in 2014 in Springfield, Missouri, the school's home.

He finished 25th in voting for the 1962 American League MVP for playing in 156 Games and had 641 At Bats, 89 Runs, 193 Hits, 34 Doubles, 10 Triples, 10 Home Runs, 83 RBI, 44 Walks, .301 Batting Average, .341 On-base percentage, .432 Slugging Percentage, 277 Total Bases, 6 Sacrifice Hits and 9 Sacrifice Flies.

In 12 seasons he played in 1,371 Games and had 4,912 At Bats, 620 Runs, 1,314 Hits, 190 Doubles, 52 Triples, 47 Home Runs, 454 RBI, 20 Stolen Bases, 428 Walks, .268 Batting Average, .325 On-base percentage, .356 Slugging Percentage, 1,749 Total Bases, 57 Sacrifice Hits, 36 Sacrifice Flies and 21 Intentional Walks.

Joe DeMaestri

Joseph Paul DeMaestri (December 9, 1928 – August 26, 2016), nicknamed "Froggy", was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball who played for the Chicago White Sox (1951), St. Louis Browns (1952), Philadelphia and Kansas City Athletics (1953–59) and New York Yankees (1960–61). Born in San Francisco, he batted and threw right-handed, stood 6 feet (1.83 m) tall and weighed 170 pounds (77 kg).

DeMaestri graduated a from Tamalpais High School in Mill Valley, California, and began his 15-year professional baseball career in the Boston Red Sox' organization in 1947. He was selected by the White Sox in the 1950 Rule 5 Draft. In an 11-season MLB career, DeMaestri was a .236 hitter with 813 hits, 49 home runs and 281 RBI in 1,121 games played. He played 905 of those games with the Athletics and made the American League All-Star team in 1957.

On July 8, 1955, at Briggs Stadium, DeMaestri collected six hits in six at bats in an 11-inning game against the Detroit Tigers. All his hits were singles and he scored two runs, but Detroit won the contest, 11–8.In December 1959, Demaestri was traded to the New York Yankees in the seven-player deal that famously brought Roger Maris to the Bronx Bombers. When the Yankees won the 1960 American League pennant, he appeared in his first and only World Series, getting into four games and collecting one hit, a single off Joe Gibbon of the Pittsburgh Pirates in the opening contest, in two at bats.

In the eighth inning of Game 7, DeMaestri took over for regular Yankee shortstop Tony Kubek when Kubek was struck in the throat by a bad-hop ground ball hit by Bill Virdon; the play sparked a three-run Pittsburgh rally. However, DeMaestri was off the field when, one inning later, Bill Mazeroski hit his famous walk-off homer against pitcher Ralph Terry. Dale Long had pinch hit for DeMaestri in the top of the ninth, and Clete Boyer had moved from third base to shortstop to take his place on defense.

Mel Allen

Mel Allen (born Melvin Allen Israel; February 14, 1913 – June 16, 1996) was an American sportscaster, best known for his long tenure as the primary play-by-play announcer for the New York Yankees. During the peak of his career in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, Allen was arguably the most prominent member of his profession, his voice familiar to millions. Years after his death, he is still promoted as having been "The Voice of the Yankees." In his later years, he gained a second professional life as the first host of This Week in Baseball.

In perhaps the most notable moment of his distinguished career, Allen called Game 7 of the 1960 World Series, in which Bill Mazeroski hit a walk-off home run off Ralph Terry to win the fall classic for the Pittsburgh Pirates. This is the only walk-off home run ever to occur in a Game 7 of a World Series.

Midwest PGA Championship

The Midwest PGA Championship is a golf tournament that is the championship of the Midwest section of the PGA of America. The section was formed in 1924, encompassing the states of Missouri and Kansas. Records kept by the section track winners back to 1960. It is unclear whether there were championship tournaments held before that time. Sam Reynolds, club pro from Kansas City, Missouri holds the record with most victories, winning five championships in the 1960s. Two-time PGA Tour winner Tom Pernice, Jr. won the title three straight years, from 1994–96. Former New York Yankees pitcher Ralph Terry won the 1980 tournament after he retired from his baseball career.

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