Ralph Neely

Ralph Eugene Neely (born September 12, 1943) is a former American football offensive tackle who played 13 seasons and 172 games for the Dallas Cowboys from 1965 to 1977.

Ralph Neely
No. 73
Position:Offensive tackle
Personal information
Born:September 12, 1943 (age 75)
Little Rock, Arkansas
Height:6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Weight:265 lb (120 kg)
Career information
High school:Farmington (NM)
College:Oklahoma
NFL Draft:1965 / Round: 2 / Pick: 28
AFL draft:1965 / Round: 2 / Pick: 15
(by the Houston Oilers)[1]
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games:172
Kick Returns:7
Kickoff yards:48
Games Started:168
Fumble Recoveries:5
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Neely attended Farmington High School (New Mexico), where he was an All-State tackle for two years in football, and a standout center for the basketball team.

He was recruited by the University of Oklahoma, where he played college football under coaches Bud Wilkinson and Gomer Jones. He was a 261-pound tackle who played both ways, as a dominant performer on defense and an excellent blocker on offense. He was named the Big Eight sophomore lineman of the year and was a two-time All-American and an all-conference selection in both 1963 and '64.

Neely was one of three Sooners stars who missed the 1965 Gator Bowl game against Florida State University. Neely, fullback Jim Grisham and halfback Lance Rentzel signed with professional teams before the game, and were ruled ineligible for the contest, which Florida State University won 36–19 on the strength of four touchdown catches by Fred Biletnikoff.

Professional career

In 1965, he was drafted in the second round of both the 1965 NFL Draft (by the Baltimore Colts) and the 1965 AFL Draft (by the Houston Oilers). On August 29, 1965, the Colts traded his rights to the Dallas Cowboys in exchange for Billy Lothridge and a fourth round selection in the 1966 NFL Draft.[2]

Neely accepted the Oilers contract offer (which also included rights to own a Houston gas station), but requested it be kept secret to remain eligible to play in the Gator Bowl. When he learned that the Colts traded his rights to the Cowboys, he began negotiating with Dallas, and returned his check to the Oilers. Litigation ensued between the Oilers and Cowboys in regards to his rights.[3]

A rookie in 1965, he joined the Cowboys just as they were beginning their ascent in the NFL, became an immediate starter at right offensive tackle and was named to the NFL all-rookie team. With great quickness for his size, he became a dominant player on the Cowboys offensive line for 13 seasons.

One of the terms of the merger agreement between the NFL and the AFL was that the Neely contract dispute be resolved. In 1966, the Cowboys finally agreed with the Oilers to send draft choices (a first, second and two fifth round choices in the 1967 NFL Draft), pay all of the court costs and to start the annual pre-season game the Governor's Cup between the two teams.[4]

Neely was a four-time All-Pro and a two-time Pro Bowler in 1967 and 1969. In 1970, Neely started the season at right guard, but soon took over for Tony Liscio at left offensive tackle, where he manned the position until 1977, while continuing to be one of the NFL’s premier offensive linemen.

He was injured halfway into the Cowboys victorious 1971 Super Bowl season, when he fractured his left leg in an off-road motorcycle accident; and missed the rest of the year.[5]

In 1977, Neely retired after the Cowboys won Super Bowl XII against the Denver Broncos.[6] He was selected to the NFL 1960s All-Decade Team, though Neely has yet to join his bookend partner Rayfield Wright, in the Pro Football Hall of Fame or in the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor.

References

  1. ^ "1965 AFL Draft". Archived from the original on February 25, 2017. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  2. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=348&dat=19650830&id=7xQwAAAAIBAJ&sjid=vzUDAAAAIBAJ&pg=5576,6408126
  3. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1876&dat=19661011&id=xoMsAAAAIBAJ&sjid=fs0EAAAAIBAJ&pg=4463,1824744
  4. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1368&dat=19661118&id=YaVRAAAAIBAJ&sjid=zRAEAAAAIBAJ&pg=4402,4746513
  5. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1454&dat=19711102&id=oWNNAAAAIBAJ&sjid=uAkEAAAAIBAJ&pg=3914,194923
  6. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1454&dat=19771223&id=DLosAAAAIBAJ&sjid=IBMEAAAAIBAJ&pg=6823,4898158

External links

1963 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1963 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1963 college football season. The selectors for the 1963 season included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press International (UPI). Players selected as first-team players by both the AP and UPI are designated in bold.

1964 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1964 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1964 college football season. The selectors for the 1964 season included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press International (UPI). Players selected as first-team players by both the AP and UPI are designated in bold.

1966 All-Pro Team

The Associated Press (AP), United Press International (UPI), Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and New York Daily News selected All-Pro players following the 1966 NFL season.

1967 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in 1967. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1968 All-Pro Team

This is a list of players named as All-Pros based on their performance in the 1968 AFL and NFL season. These lists provide a perspective into how players were judged against their peers by critics of their time. Players representing both the National Football League (NFL) and American Football League (AFL) are included.

1971 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1971 Dallas Cowboys season was the team's 12th in the National Football League and the first at the new Texas Stadium in suburban Irving, Texas. The club led the NFL with 406 points scored. Their defense allowed 222 points.

For the sixth consecutive season, the Cowboys had a first-place finish. They won their second-consecutive NFC championship, then defeated the Miami Dolphins in Super Bowl VI to capture their first Super Bowl championship. They were the first team from the NFC to win a Super Bowl since the 1970 merger of the National Football League and the American Football League, and subsequently, the first team from the NFC East division to win the title.

1976 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1976 Dallas Cowboys season was their 17th in the league. The team improved on their previous output of 10–4, winning eleven games. They qualified for the playoffs, but were stunned by the Los Angeles Rams in the Divisional round.

Andy Frederick

Andrew Brian Frederick (born July 25, 1954) is a former American football offensive tackle in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys, Cleveland Browns, and Chicago Bears. He played college football at the University of New Mexico.

Bill Gregory

William Penn Gregory, Jr. (born December 14, 1949) is a former American football defensive lineman in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys and Seattle Seahawks. He played college football at the University of Wisconsin.

Billy Joe DuPree

Billy Joe DuPree (born March 7, 1950) is a former professional American football tight end in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at Michigan State University.

Billy Lothridge

William Lamar Lothridge (January 1, 1942 – February 24, 1996) was an American football Punter, Safety and Quarterback in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys, Los Angeles Rams, Atlanta Falcons and Miami Dolphins. He played college football at Georgia Tech.

Dirty Dozen (American football)

The Dirty Dozen were the rookies that made the Dallas Cowboys team in 1975. These players were credited with helping the Cowboys advance to Super Bowl X and was a key foundation of the team's success during the latter half of the 1970s going into the early 1980s, as by 1979 many of these players would have replaced many of the Cowboys' aging starters of the 1960s. The rookies came up with the nickname inspired by the film of the same name, and spent half of the season without shaving.

Farmington High School (New Mexico)

Farmington High School (FHS) is a public high school in Farmington, New Mexico (USA). It is part of the Farmington Municipal School District.

FHS is one of two high schools in Farmington. It serves students in grades 9 through 12 who reside on the west side of the city along NM 170 and NM 3711. The second high school in Farmington is Piedra Vista High School, which is located on the east side of the city.

Guy Brown

Guy Brown, III (born June 1, 1955) is a former American football linebacker in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at the University of Houston.

John Fitzgerald (center)

John Robert Fitzgerald (born April 16, 1948) is a former American football center in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys from 1971 to 1980, including four Super Bowls. He played college football at Boston College and was drafted in the fourth round of the 1970 NFL Draft.

List of Oklahoma Sooners football All-Americans

This is a list of Oklahoma Sooners college football players who were named first team All-Americans. The selecting organizations for football All-Americans that the NCAA recognizes include the Associated Press, American Football Coaches Association, Football Writers Association of America, The Sporting News, and the Walter Camp Football Foundation. The NCAA defines consensus All-Americans as players who were accorded a majority of votes at their positions by these selectors. Unanimous All-Americans are players who were selected by all five selectors.Oklahoma has had 162 first team All-Americans in its history. 80 of these were consensus, and 35 were unanimous. OU has the most unanimous All-Americans in the history of college football.

National Football League 1960s All-Decade Team

This is a list of National Football League (NFL) players who had outstanding performances throughout the 1960s and have been compiled together into this fantasy group. The team was selected by voters of the Pro Football Hall of Fame at the end of the decade.

Pat Donovan

Patrick Emery Donovan (born July 1, 1953) is a former American football offensive lineman in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at Stanford University. Sports Illustrated named him the fourth greatest Montana athlete of the 20th century.

Rayfield Wright

Larry Rayfield Wright (born August 23, 1945) is a former American football player, an offensive tackle for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League for thirteen seasons and a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, having been inducted in 2006.Nicknamed the "Big Cat" for his nimble feet, Wright played on five NFC Championship teams that advanced to the Super Bowl (1970, 1971, 1975, 1977, and 1978 seasons), winning twice. He also participated in the Ice Bowl against the Green Bay Packers for the NFL championship in his rookie season in 1967.

Backfield
Line

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.