Raleigh McKenzie

Raleigh McKenzie (born February 8, 1963) is an American football college scout for the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League, where he worked for his twin brother, general manager Reggie McKenzie until the latter's firing in December 2018. During a 16-year football career, he played for four different teams as an offensive lineman. Raleigh played guard for the Washington Redskins from 1985 to 1994. Nicknamed "Rallo," he played primarily as a reserve during his first season before becoming a vital starter due to injury. He started in each game after that at any of the five positions on the offensive line, but his speciality was center. He played on two Super Bowl Champion teams in 1987 and 1991. He was named to the All-NFL Team in 1991. He also played for the Philadelphia Eagles, San Diego Chargers, and Green Bay Packers.

McKenzie attended Austin-East High School in Knoxville, where, like his brother, he played both at linebacker and on the offensive line (Raiders Director of Player Personnel Joey Clinkscales was among their teammates). Raleigh was named the 11th-best recruit in Tennessee by the Knoxville News Sentinel following his senior year.[1]

The McKenzie brothers played for the University of Tennessee from 1981 to 1984. Both played linebacker as freshmen, but Raleigh switched to center during his sophomore season.[2] Playing alongside All-American Bill Mayo and future NFL lineman Bruce Wilkerson,[3] McKenzie anchored a line that helped running back Johnnie Jones set school records for rushing in 1984. McKenzie's position coach was future Vol head coach Phillip Fulmer.[4] In September 2011, the McKenzie brothers were honored as UT "Legends of the Game" during the Vols' game against Cincinnati.[5]

McKenzie joined the Redskins for training camp in 2001 assisting the personnel department. He also ran summer football camp. Before joining his brother in Oakland, Raleigh was an assistant football coach at Herndon High School in Virginia.[5]

Both brothers are members of Omega Psi Phi fraternity.

Raleigh McKenzie
refer to caption
McKenzie playing for the Redskins in Super Bowl XXII
No. 63
Position:Guard / Center
Personal information
Born:February 8, 1963 (age 56)
Knoxville, Tennessee
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:291 lb (132 kg)
Career information
High school:Knoxville (TN) Austin-East
College:Tennessee
NFL Draft:1985 / Round: 11 / Pick: 290
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:227
Games started:184
Fumble recoveries:4
Player stats at NFL.com

References

  1. ^ "1981 Tennessee Signees," 1981 Tennessee Volunteers Football Guide (University of Tennessee, 1981), p. 57.
  2. ^ "1982 Tennessee Squad," 1982 Tennessee Volunteers Football Guide (University of Tennessee, 1982), p. 51.
  3. ^ "1984 Offense," 1984 Tennessee Volunteers Football Guide (University of Tennessee, 1984), p. 38.
  4. ^ "1984 Tennessee Squad," 1984 Tennessee Volunteers Football Guide (University of Tennessee, 1984), p. 55.
  5. ^ a b John Painter, "Catching Up: Raleigh and Reggie McKenzie," UTSports.com, September 9, 2011. Retrieved: August 2, 2013.
1984 Tennessee Volunteers football team

The 1984 Tennessee Volunteers football team (variously "Tennessee", "UT" or the "Vols") represented the University of Tennessee in the 1984 NCAA Division I-A football season. Playing as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC), the team was led by head coach Johnny Majors, in his eighth year, and played their home games at Neyland Stadium in Knoxville, Tennessee. They finished the season with a record of seven wins, four losses and one tie (7–4–1 overall, 3–3 in the SEC) and a loss against Maryland in the Sun Bowl. The Volunteers offense scored 327 points while the defense allowed 276 points.

1985 Washington Redskins season

The 1985 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 54th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 49th in Washington, D.C.. The team failed to improve on their 11–5 record from 1984 and finished 10-6. The biggest moment of the year occurred on a November 18 Monday Night Football game, which witnessed Joe Theismann's career-ending injury after a sack by New York Giants outside linebacker Lawrence Taylor. The tackle resulted in a serious leg injury, and Theismann never played in the NFL again. Though the team failed to make the playoffs, they remained in contention for the entire regular season.

1986 Washington Redskins season

The 1986 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 55th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 51st in Washington, D.C.. The team improved on their 10–6 record from 1985 and returned to the playoffs after missing them the previous year, finishing with a 12–4 record, a second place finish in the NFC East, and qualified for the playoffs as a wild card. They defeated the Los Angeles Rams in the NFC Wild Card Game at RFK Stadium, then upset the defending champion Chicago Bears in the Divisional Playoffs. The season came to an end in the NFC Championship Game when the Redskins were defeated by their division rivals, the New York Giants.

1987 Washington Redskins season

The 1987 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's strike-shortened 56th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 52nd in Washington, D.C. The season was a shortened due to the 1987 NFL strike.

The team had finished second in the NFC East the previous season with a 12–4 record. Games to be played during the third week of the season were canceled, and replacement players were used to play games from weeks 4 through 6.

The Redskins won the NFC East with an 11–4 record. The Redskins defeated the Denver Broncos 42–10 to win Super Bowl XXII. It was the Redskins' second Super Bowl win in six seasons, and coincidentally, their second Super Bowl win in a strike-season.Redskins quarterback Doug Williams became the first black quarterback to start in a Super Bowl and was the only individual to have emerged victorious until Russell Wilson won Super Bowl XLVIII with the Seattle Seahawks.By virtue of the Redskins' 17-10 victory over Minnesota in the NFC title game, head coach Joe Gibbs earned his 10th playoff victory. He surpassed the legendary Vince Lombardi, who had retired after his 9th playoff victory and (coincidentally) later coached the Redskins for one season. Also ironic was the rumor that, following a disastrous 5-9-1 season, Green Bay would hire Gibbs to replace the dismissed Forrest Gregg. However, after the game, Gibbs would deny that he was interested. On March 8, 2018 the Redskins announced that they will honor the replacement players from the 1987 team with Super Bowl XXII rings.

1988 Washington Redskins season

The 1988 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 57th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 53rd in Washington, D.C. They failed to improve on their 11–4 record from 1987, when they won Super Bowl XXII and finished 7-9. The Redskins failed to qualify for the playoffs for the first time since 1985. They were the seventh team in NFL history to enter a season as the defending Super Bowl champion and miss the playoffs.The Week 8 meeting against Green Bay at Lambeau Field would be the two teams' final meeting for 13 years.

1992 Washington Redskins season

The 1992 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 61st season in the National Football League. This season began with the team trying to win their second Super Bowl in a row, following Super Bowl XXVI.

The Redskins finished with a record of nine wins and seven losses, but still made the 1992–93 NFL playoffs. Nonetheless, a lean period for the Redskins was to follow; they were not to make the postseason again until the 1999 season and have since never seriously contended for another Super Bowl despite five more playoff appearances.

This season would be Joe Gibbs' final season coaching the Washington Redskins until he returned in the 2004 season. Gibbs was the most successful coach in Redskins history, leading the team to three Super Bowl victories (1982, 1987, 1991), and eight playoff berths in eleven seasons (1981-1992).

1993 Washington Redskins season

The 1993 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 62nd season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 57th in Washington, D.C.. The team failed to improve on their 9–7 record from 1992. Head coach Joe Gibbs retired following the 1992 season and the Redskins promoted his defensive coordinator, Richie Petitbon, to be the head coach. The Redskins’ aging core struggled with injuries while numerous key players (Gary Clark, Wilber Marshall, Martin Mayhew, Jumpy Geathers, and Fred Stokes) left the team via free agency. Management tried to ease the losses by signing players like Carl Banks, Tim McGee, Al Noga, and Rick Graf, but none had a major impact on the team. The team finished the season with a 4–12 record and missed the playoffs for the first time since 1989. Petitbon was fired at the end of the season.

It was the only season in Redskins history where no player was selected to the Pro Bowl.

1994 Washington Redskins season

The 1994 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 63rd season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 58th in Washington, D.C.

The Redskins' 3–13 season was the worst record the team had posted since 1961, and the fewest wins they have ever had in a 16-game season (later to be matched by their 2013 season). The team was decimated by the loss of head coach Joe Gibbs and the onset of the modern salary cap and free agency system. The Redskins were forced to depend on younger and untested players at many key positions.

The season marked the hiring of head coach Norv Turner, who would spend the next six seasons coaching the Redskins.

In addition to going winless at RFK in 1994, Turner's first season in Washington saw the team lose at home to the Falcons for the first time. Prior to the Falcons' 27-20 victory in Week 4, Atlanta had been 0-10 against the Redskins at RFK. This included a 24-7 loss to the Redskins during Washington's most recent championship season.

1996 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1996 Philadelphia Eagles season was their 64th in the National Football League (NFL). The team matched their previous output of 10–6 and qualifying for the playoffs.

After a season ending injury to Rodney Peete, Ty Detmer took over the starting role. For the second time in three seasons, the Eagles were 7–2 at the nine-game mark, thanks to a thrilling win November 3 on the road against Dallas. The capper to that contest was a combined 104-yard interception return between James Willis and Troy Vincent in the final moments which turned a potential game-winning drive by the Cowboys into a Philadelphia victory.

As in 1994 under Rich Kotite, the Eagles wilted. This time four losses in five games, including an embarrassing 27-point setback on national TV at Indianapolis, had the club scrambling in the playoff picture. However, wins against the lowly Jets and Cardinals managed to right the ship, and a wild-card berth was the reward.

The 1996 season was also the first season the Eagles debuted the midnight green, white, and black look, with new helmet designs and the logo and endzone font as well.

1997 San Diego Chargers season

The 1997 San Diego Chargers season was the franchise's 28th season in the National Football League (NFL), its 38th overall and was the first season under Kevin Gilbride. As the Chargers struggled with Stan Humphries missing half the season, failing to impove on their 8–8 record from 1996, finshed with a 4–12 record and missing the playoffs for the second consctive season.

Backup Quarterback Craig Whelihan went winless in seven starts, as the team lost their final eight games after a 4-4 start and scored only one offensive touchdown in their final three games. The team's stadium, Qualcomm Stadium hosted Super Bowl XXXII at the end of the season.

1999 Green Bay Packers season

The 1999 Green Bay Packers season was their 81st season overall and their 79th in the National Football League. It was the first and only season for head coach Ray Rhodes. The Packers finished 8–8, posting their worst record since Brett Favre took over the helm as the Packers' starting quarterback.

2000 Green Bay Packers season

The 2000 Green Bay Packers season was their 82nd season overall and their 80th in the National Football League. It was the first season for which Mike Sherman was the head coach of the team. Sherman was the thirteenth head coach in franchise history. The Packers finished 9–7, failing to qualify for the playoffs. The Packers total offense ranked 15th in the league, and their total defense ranked 15th in the league.

Alvin Toles

Alvin Toles (March 23, 1963 in Barnesville, Georgia) is a former American football player who played linebacker for the New Orleans Saints in the National Football League from 1985 until 1988, when a knee injury ended his career. He played college football at the University of Tennessee, initially as a fullback before switching to linebacker his junior year. He was the Saints' 1st-round pick in the 1985 NFL Draft.

Jeff Bostic

Jeffrey Lynn Bostic (born September 18, 1958) is a former American football offensive lineman who played for the Washington Redskins in the National Football League (NFL).

John Gesek

John Christian Gesek Jr. (born February 18, 1963) is a former American football offensive lineman in the National Football League for the Los Angeles Raiders, Dallas Cowboys, and Washington Redskins. He played college football at Sacramento State University and was drafted in the tenth round of the 1987 NFL Draft.

Kahlil McKenzie

Reginald Kahlil McKenzie Jr. (born January 3, 1997) is an American football guard for the Kansas City Chiefs. He is the son of former NFL linebacker and Oakland Raiders general manager Reggie McKenzie and nephew of former NFL guard Raleigh McKenzie. He played college football at the University of Tennessee.

Reggie McKenzie (linebacker)

Reginald McKenzie (born February 8, 1963) is an American football executive and former player, and is currently a senior personnel executive for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League (NFL). He previously served as the general manager of the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League from January 5, 2012, until his firing on December 10, 2018. Previously, McKenzie was a linebacker for the Raiders and was later the director of player personnel for the Green Bay Packers. He played college football at Tennessee.

Super Bowl XXII

Super Bowl XXII was an American football game between the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Washington Redskins and American Football Conference (AFC) champion Denver Broncos to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1987 season. The Redskins defeated the Broncos by the score of 42–10, winning their second Super Bowl. The game was played on January 31, 1988 at Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego, the first time that the Super Bowl was played in that city.

This Super Bowl came at the end of a season that was shortened by a players' strike. Each team only missed one regular season game due to the labor dispute, but three games were played mostly with replacement players until the dispute was settled. The Broncos were making their second consecutive (and third overall) Super Bowl appearance, after posting a 10–4–1 regular season record, largely through the strength of their quarterback, John Elway. The Redskins, who were making their fourth Super Bowl appearance, posted an 11–4 regular season record. Washington was led by quarterback Doug Williams, who entered the season as a backup, and was 0-2 as a starter during the regular season. He ended up leading Washington to their two playoff victories. In doing so, he became the first African American quarterback ever to start in an NFL league championship game, let alone a Super Bowl.

After trailing 10–0 at the end of the first quarter of Super Bowl XXII, the Redskins scored 42 unanswered points, including a record-breaking 35 points in the second quarter, and setting several other Super Bowl records. Williams, who was named the Super Bowl MVP, completed 18 of 29 passes for a Super Bowl record 340 yards and four touchdowns, with one interception. He also became the first player in Super Bowl history to pass for four touchdowns in a single quarter, and four in a half. And thus Williams became the first African American starting quarterback to also win a Super Bowl.

The Hogs (American football)

The Hogs were the offensive line of the Washington Redskins of the National Football League during the 1980s and early 1990s. Renowned for their ability to control the line of scrimmage, the Hogs helped the Redskins win three Super Bowl championships (XVII, XXII and XXVI) under head coach Joe Gibbs.

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