Ragnar Colvin

Admiral Sir Ragnar Musgrave Colvin, KBE, CB (7 May 1882 – 22 February 1954) was a long-serving Royal Navy officer who commanded the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) at the outbreak of the Second World War.

Sir Ragnar Colvin
AWM001235-Menzies-Colvin
Robert Menzies and Admiral Ragnar Colvin at HMAS Perth march, 1940
Born7 May 1882
Whitehall, London
Died22 February 1954 (aged 71)
Royal Hospital Haslar, Hampshire
AllegianceUnited Kingdom
Service/branchRoyal Navy
Years of service1896–1944
RankAdmiral
Commands heldChief of the Australian Naval Staff (1937–41)
Royal Naval College, Greenwich (1934–37)
2nd Battle Squadron (1932–33)
HMS Revenge (1924–25)
HMS Caradoc (1919–21)
Battles/warsFirst World War
Second World War
AwardsKnight Commander of the Order of the British Empire
Companion of the Order of the Bath

Early life and background

Colvin was the son of Clement Sneyd Colvin and his wife Alice Jane, née Lethbridge.[1] This connected him with a long and illustrious line of British Empire soldiers and administrators, the Colvin family; his grandfather was John Russell Colvin, lieutenant-governor of the North-West Provinces of British India during the mutiny of 1857.[2] His uncles included Walter Mytton and Auckland, also lieutenant-governor of the North-West Provinces and Oudh. A first cousin, Brenda Colvin (1897–1981),[3] was an important landscape architect, author of standard works in the field and a force behind its professionalization. A more distant cousin was Sidney Colvin, who grew up to be a critic, curator, and great friend of Robert Louis Stevenson.

Naval career

Colvin joined the Royal Navy as a cadet in HMS Britannia in 1896,[1] was commissioned lieutenant six years later and, after qualifying as a gunnery specialist in 1904, was promoted commander in 1913.[1] In the First World War he served as Executive Officer in the cruiser HMS Hibernia, and in the battleship HMS Revenge in which he served in the Battle of Jutland in 1916.[1] Promoted captain on 31 December 1917, he served in the Admiralty as Assistant Director of Plans and was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire.[1]

After the war Colvin commanded the cruiser HMS Caradoc in the Black Sea and the Mediterranean and in 1922 to 1924 he was Naval Attaché in Tokyo.[1] He re-joined HMS Revenge as Flag Captain to the Commander-in-Chief, Atlantic Fleet, and in 1927 became Director of the Naval Tactical School, Portsmouth.[1] Colvin was promoted rear admiral in 1929 and soon was appointed Chief of Staff to the Commander-in-Chief, Atlantic Fleet.[1] In 1932 he was appointed a Companion of the Order of the Bath and became Commander of the 2nd Battle Squadron.[1] Promoted vice admiral in 1934, he became president of the Royal Naval College, Greenwich, and commander of the Royal Naval War College.[1] He was appointed a Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath in 1937.[1]

Colvin was appointed Chief of Naval Staff to the Royal Australian Navy in 1937.[1] Under his leadership, the Royal Australian Navy expanded its naval fleet and maintained a high profile in Australia's military affairs.

At the outbreak of the Second World War, Colvin was an active participant in international planning; however, by 1940 his health was failing and he resigned the following year.[1] Colvin returned to London where he served as Naval Advisor to the Australian High Commission from 1942 to 1944.[1]

Family

In 1918 he married Sibyl Kays.[1] They had two children:

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Colvin, Sir Ragnar Musgrave (1882–1954), Australian Dictionary of Biography, accessed 28 August 2009
  2. ^ John Russell Colvin at Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  3. ^ Brenda Colvin at Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  4. ^ Family of Donaldson, accessed 28 August 2009
  5. ^ Colin James Balfour, The Times, 2009-08-17, accessed 28 August 2009
Military offices
Preceded by
Sir Barry Domvile
President of the Royal Naval College, Greenwich
1934–1937
Succeeded by
Sir Sidney Bailey
Preceded by
Sir George Hyde
First Naval Member and Chief of Staff
1937–1941
Succeeded by
Sir Guy Royle
Chief of Navy (Australia)

The Chief of Navy is the most senior appointment in the Royal Australian Navy, responsible to the Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) and the Secretary of Defence. The rank associated with the position is vice admiral (3-star).

Vice Admiral Michael Noonan is the current chief of navy; he assumed the position on 06 July 2018.

Colvin (surname)

Colvin is a surname, and may refer to:

Addison B. Colvin (1858–1939), American banker and politician

Andrew Colvin, Commissioner of the Australian Federal Police

Andrew J. Colvin (1808–1889), New York lawyer and politician

Bobby Colvin (1876–1940), Scottish footballer (Liverpool FC)

Clare Colvin, British writer

Claudette Colvin (born 1939), American activist for African American rights

D. Leigh Colvin (1880–1959), American politician, active in the temperance movement

Dora Colvin, American trucker, pioneering woman in the occupation

Douglas Glenn Colvin (1951–2002), real name of American musician Dee Dee Ramone

Edwin A. Colvin, American politician

Fred H. Colvin (1867–1965), American machinist and writer

Harvey Doolittle Colvin (1815–1892), American politician

Holly Colvin (born 1989), English cricketer

Howard Colvin (1919–2007), British architectural historian and writer

Hugh Colvin (1887–1962), British soldier

Jack Colvin (1934–2005), American actor

James Colvin (pseudonym), pseudonym used by Michael Moorcock

James Morris Colquhoun Colvin (1870–1945), British Army officer

John Colvin (diplomat) (1922–2003), British diplomat and spy

John O. Colvin (born 1946), American judge

John Russell Colvin (1807–1857), British administrator in India, and his sons:

Sir Auckland Colvin (1838–1908), British civil servant in India, Turkey, and Egypt; founder of Colvin Taluqdars' College

Walter Mytton Colvin (1847–1908), British colonial administrator

Kathryn Colvin (born 1945), British diplomat

Marie Colvin (1957–2012), American journalist

Mark Colvin (1952–2017), Australian broadcaster

Mary Colvin (1907–1988), director of the British Women's Royal Army Corps

Michael Colvin (1932–2000), British MP

Monty Colvin, American musician in the band Galactic Cowboys

Sir Ragnar Colvin (1882–1954), British and Australian admiral

Richard Colvin (UK MP) (1856–1936), British MP

Richard Colvin (diplomat) (born 1969), Canadian diplomat of British birth

Rosevelt Colvin (born 1977), American football player

Sarah Tarleton Colvin (1865-1949), American nurse and activist

Shawn Colvin (born 1956), American musician

Sir Sidney Colvin (1845–1927), British critic, curator, and friend of Robert Louis Stevenson

Verplanck Colvin (1847–1920), American surveyor and champion of the Adirondacks

Colvin family

The Colvin family, for the purposes of this article, is that group of people descended from James Colquhoun Colvin (1767–1847), the son of Alexander Colvin (1718–1791) and Elizabeth 'Bettie' née Kennedy (1714–1795). James was a merchant trading between London and Calcutta during the East India Company. This Anglo-Indian family was intimately involved with the British Raj, first as traders and then as administrators and soldiers. Their descendants continued in service to the British Empire and later in some of its constituent countries.

David Leach (admiral)

Vice Admiral David Willoughby Leach (born 17 July 1928) is a retired senior officer of the Royal Australian Navy, who served as Chief of the Naval Staff from 1982 to 1985.

Donald Chalmers

Vice Admiral Donald Bruce Chalmers, (born 29 April 1942) is a retired senior commander of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), who served as Chief of Navy from 1997 to 1999.

George Hyde (admiral)

Admiral Sir George Francis Hyde, (19 July 1877 – 28 July 1937) was an English-born Australian admiral, known as a former head and the first officer to achieve the rank of full admiral in the Royal Australian Navy.

Guy Royle

Admiral Sir Guy Charles Cecil Royle (17 August 1885 – 4 January 1954) was a Royal Navy officer who went on to be Fifth Sea Lord and First Naval Member of the Royal Australian Navy.

Hastings Harrington

Vice Admiral Sir Wilfred Hastings "Arch" Harrington (17 May 1906 – 17 December 1965) was a senior officer in the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), who served as First Naval Member and Chief of the Naval Staff from 1962 to 1965.

Ian MacDougall

Vice Admiral Ian Donald George MacDougall (born 23 February 1938) is a retired senior commander of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), who served as Chief of Naval Staff from 1991 to 1994. He also served as Commissioner of New South Wales Fire Brigades, and is Patron of the Submarines Association Australia.

John Colvin (diplomat)

John Horace Ragnar Colvin, CMG (18 June 1922 – 4 October 2003) was a British sailor, intelligence officer, banker and military historian.

John Russell Colvin

John Russell Colvin (29 May 1807 – 9 September 1857) was a British civil servant in India, part of the illustrious Anglo-Indian Colvin family. He was lieutenant-governor of the North-West Provinces of British India during the Indian Rebellion of 1857, at the height of which he died.

Mark Colvin

Mark Colvin (13 March 1952 – 11 May 2017) was an Australian journalist and radio and television broadcaster for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), and worked on most of the flagship current affairs programs. Notably, based in Sydney, he was the presenter of PM— the radio current affairs program on the ABC Radio network — from 1997 to 2017.

Michael Noonan (admiral)

Vice Admiral Michael Joseph Noonan, (born 13 December 1966) is a senior officer in the Royal Australian Navy and the current Chief of Navy since 6 July 2018. He previously served as Commander Border Protection Command from 2013 to 2015, and Deputy Chief of Navy from January 2016 until March 2018.

Percy Grant (Royal Navy officer)

Admiral Sir Edmund Percy Fenwick George Grant, (23 September 1867 – 8 September 1952) was a Royal Navy officer who served as First Naval Member and Chief of the Australian Naval Staff from 1919 to 1921.

Sidney Bailey

Admiral Sir Sidney Robert Bailey (27 August 1882 – 27 March 1942) was a Royal Navy officer who became President of the Royal Naval College, Greenwich.

Stella Bowen

Esther Gwendolyn "Stella" Bowen (1893–1947) was an Australian artist and writer.

Tim Barrett (admiral)

Vice Admiral Timothy William Barrett, (born 8 January 1959) is a retired senior officer in the Royal Australian Navy. Barrett served as Commander Australian Fleet from 2011 to 2014, before being appointed Chief of Navy in June 2014. He retired in July 2018 after four years as navy chief and 42 years in the navy.

William Munro Kerr

Vice Admiral Sir William Munro Kerr (4 March 1876 – 26 October 1959) was a Royal Navy officer who served as First Naval Member and Chief of the Australian Naval Staff from 1929 to 1931.

William Napier (Royal Navy officer)

Admiral William Rawdon Napier, (13 June 1877 – 8 April 1951) was a Royal Navy officer who served as First Naval Member and Chief of the Australian Naval Staff from 1926 to 1929.

Director,
Commonwealth Naval Forces
First Naval Members,
Australian Commonwealth Naval Board
Chiefs of the Naval Staff
Chiefs of Navy

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.