Rabat

Rabat (Arabic: الرِّبَاط‎, al-ribāṭ; Berber languages: ⴰⵕⴱⴰⵟ Aṛṛbaṭ) is the capital city of Morocco and the country's seventh largest city with an urban population of approximately 580,000 (2014)[2] and a metropolitan population of over 1.2 million. It is also the capital city of the Rabat-Salé-Kénitra administrative region.[3]

Once a reputed corsair haven, Rabat served as one of the many ports in North Africa for the Barbary pirates, who were particularly active from the 16th through the 18th centuries. The city is located on the Atlantic Ocean at the mouth of the river Bou Regreg. On the facing shore of the river lies Salé, the city's main commuter town. Rabat, Temara, and Salé form a conurbation of over 1.8 million people. Silt-related problems have diminished Rabat's role as a port; however, Rabat, and Salé still maintain important textile, food processing and construction industries. In addition, tourism and the presence of all foreign embassies in Morocco serve to make Rabat one of the most important cities in the country. The Moroccan capital was ranked at second place by CNN in its "Top Travel Destinations of 2013".[4] It is one of four Imperial cities of Morocco, and the medina of Rabat is listed as a World Heritage Site. Rabat is accessible by train through the ONCF system and by plane through the nearby Rabat–Salé Airport.

Rabat

الرِّبَاط
ⴰⵕⴱⴰⵟ
Kasbah des Oudaias P1060348
Marokko 011
Royal Palace, Rabat
Une ruelle de la Kasbah des Oudayas
Chellah Rabat
Tour Hassan-Rabat
Flag of Rabat
Flag
Arms of Rabat
Seal
Rabat is located in Morocco
Rabat
Rabat
Location in Morocco & Africa
Rabat is located in Africa
Rabat
Rabat
Rabat (Africa)
Coordinates: 34°02′N 6°50′W / 34.033°N 6.833°W[1]
CountryMorocco
RegionRabat-Salé-Kénitra
Founded by Almohads1146
Government
 • MayorMohamed Sadiki
Area
 • City117 km2 (45.17 sq mi)
Highest elevation
160 m (520 ft)
Lowest elevation
0 m (0 ft)
Population
(2014)[2]
 • City577,827
 • Rank7th in Morocco
 • Density4,900/km2 (13,000/sq mi)
 • Metro
2,120,192
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
Websitewww.rabat.ma
Official nameRabat, Modern Capital and Historic City: a Shared Heritage
TypeCultural
Criteriaii, iv
Designated2012 (36th session)
Reference no.1401
State PartyMorocco
RegionArab States

History

Palace gate
Bab Oudaia gate

12th to 17th century

Rabat has a relatively modern history compared to the nearby ancient city of Salé. In 1146, the Almohad ruler Abd al-Mu'min[5] turned Rabat's ribat into a full-scale fortress to use as a launching point for attacks on Iberia. In 1170, due to its military importance, Rabat acquired the title Ribatu l-Fath, meaning "stronghold of victory," from which it derives its current name.[6]

Yaqub al-Mansur (known as Moulay Yacoub in Morocco), another Almohad Caliph, moved the capital of his empire to Rabat.[7] He built Rabat's city walls, the Kasbah of the Udayas and began construction on what would have been the world's largest mosque. However, Yaqub died and construction stopped. The ruins of the unfinished mosque, along with the Hassan Tower, still stand today.

Yaqub's death initiated a period of decline. The Almohad empire lost control of its possessions in Spain and much of its African territory, eventually leading to its total collapse. In the 13th century, much of Rabat's economic power shifted to Fez. In 1515 a Moorish explorer, El Wassan, reported that Rabat had declined so much that only 100 inhabited houses remained. An influx of Moriscos, who had been expelled from Spain, in the early 17th century helped boost Rabat's growth.

Corsair republics

Rabat and neighboring Salé united to form the Republic of Bou Regreg in 1627[8]. The republic was run by Barbary pirates who used the two cities as base ports for launching attacks on shipping. The pirates did not have to contend with any central authority until the Alaouite Dynasty united Morocco in 1666. The latter attempted to establish control over the pirates, but failed. European and Muslim authorities continued to attempt to control the pirates over many years, but the Republic of Bou Regreg did not collapse until 1818. Even after the republic's collapse, pirates continued to use the port of Rabat, which led to the shelling of the city by Austria in 1829 after an Austrian ship had been lost to a pirate attack.

20th century

French invasion

The French invaded Morocco in 1912[9] and established a protectorate. The French administrator of Morocco, General Hubert Lyautey,[10] decided to relocate the country's capital from Fez to Rabat. Among other factors, rebellious citizens had made Fez an unstable place. Sultan Moulay Youssef followed the decision of the French and moved his residence to Rabat. In 1913, Gen. Lyautey hired Henri Prost who designed the Ville Nouvelle (Rabat's modern quarter) as an administrative sector. When Morocco achieved independence in 1955, Mohammed V, the then King of Morocco, chose to have the capital remain at Rabat.

Post World War II

Following World War II, the United States established a military presence in Rabat at the former French air base. By the early 1950s, Rabat Salé Air Base was a U.S. Air Force installation hosting the 17th Air Force and the 5th Air Division, which oversaw forward basing for Strategic Air Command (SAC) B-47 Stratojet aircraft in the country. With the destabilization of French government in Morocco, and Moroccan independence in 1956, the government of Mohammed V wanted the U.S. Air Force to pull out of the SAC bases in Morocco, insisting on such action after American intervention in Lebanon in 1958. The United States agreed to leave as of December 1959, and was fully out of Morocco by 1963. SAC felt the Moroccan bases were much less critical with the long range capability of the B-52 Stratofortresses that were replacing the B-47s and with the completion of the USAF installations in Spain in 1959.[11]

With the USAF withdrawal from Rabat-Salé in the 1960s, the facility became a primary facility for the Royal Moroccan Air Force known as Air Base Nº 1, a status it continues to hold.

Neighbourhoods of Rabat

Siège Maroc Telecom à Rabat
The headquarters of Maroc Telecom

Rabat is an administrative city. It does have many shopping districts and residential neighbourhoods. The geographically spread out neighbourhoods are as follows:

The heart of the city consists of three parts: the Medina (old town); the Oudayas and Hassan both located to meet the Bou Regreg; and the Atlantic Ocean.

To the west, and along the waterfront, there is a succession of neighbourhoods.

First, around the ramparts, there is the old neighbourhoods, Quartier l'Océan and Quartier les Orangers. Beyond that, a succession of mostly working-class districts: Diour Jamaa, Akkari, Yacoub El Mansour, Massira and Hay el Fath are the main parts of this axis. Hay el Fath, which ends this sequence, evolves into a middle-class neighbourhood.

To the east, along the Bouregreg, the Youssoufia region: Mabella; Taqaddoum; Hay Nahda; Aviation; and Rommani (working and middle classes).

Between the two axes, from north to south, there are three main neighbourhoods (middle class to affluent): Agdal (Ward Building; a lively mix of residential and commercial buildings. The residents are predominantly upper middle class); Hay Riad (affluent villas; this neighbourhood has experienced a surge of momentum since the 2000s); and Souissi (residential neighborhood).

On the outskirts of Souissi, are a number of less-dense regions mainly comprising large private houses to areas that seem out of the city.[12]

Riad District

Riad District

Pietri Square

Pietri Square

Boulevard Rabat

Rabat Hassan

Mohamed V

Avenue Mohammed V

Bouregreg Marina

Located between the Atlantic and the Bouregreg Valley, this magnificent river marina is paved with famous historical sites like the esplanade of the Hassan Tower and the picturesque Chellah necropolis, which has witnessed many Mediterranean civilizations pass by.

Outfitted with the most modern equipment to host up to 240 boats, the Bouregreg Marina aims to become an essential destination for recreational boaters seeking long stays or just an unforgettable stopover on their way to West Africa, the Caribbean or the shores of North America.

Marina de Salé

Bouregreg Marina

Tûranor PlanetSolar Rabat

Behind Tûranor PlanetSolar is a new Hassan II bridge between Rabat and Salé

Subdivisions

The prefecture is divided administratively into the following:[2]

Name Geographic code Type Households Population (2014) Foreign population Moroccan population Notes
Agdal Riyad 421.01.01. Arrondissement 22,399 77,257 4,572 72,685
El Youssoufia 421.01.03. Arrondissement 42,312 170,561 2,858 167,703
Hassan 421.01.05. Arrondissement 32,848 108,179 2,151 106,025
Souissi 421.01.06. Arrondissement 5,924 23,366 1,203 22,163
Touarga 421.01.07. Municipality 812 3,932 8 3,924
Yacoub El Mansour 421.01.09. Arrondissement 47,375 194,532 2,099 192,433

Families of Rabat

Called Rbatis, these families have lived for more than 400 years with many events in common. From the expulsion of the Moriscos to arrive at the foundation of a culture that combines the Arabic and Andalusian cultures, through the Republic of Bouregreg events than other families coming to live in Rabat recently, have not known.

Since its founding, Rabat was inhabited by several families from the High Atlas with Abu Yusuf Yaqub al-Mansur, who founded the city in 1198, then families from many parts of Morocco have settled. Rabat has around 1240 a few hundred fifty families whose families Chiadmi, Regragui, Loudiyi, etc.

Since the end of the thirteenth century, the city has had an influx of Moriscos expelled from Granada until 1609, the year of total expulsion of Muslims from Spain by Philip III. These families include: Bargach (Vargas); Guedira (Guadaira); Mouline (Molina); Sebbata (Zapata); and Frej.

The said families are considered, until today, as "Rbati's Families of strain". They are about four hundred families.

Other families in the city are considered residents of Rabat because they came at the time when Rabat became the capital of the country, either through rural exodus or to work in public administration based in the city since the establishment of the protectorate.

The city is on the territory of Zaer, an Arab tribe of Maqil origin. Leo Africanus in the early 16th century the signals in the region of Khenifra there, she continued on to the north to the Rabat region.

Climate

Rabat features a Mediterranean climate (Csa) with warm to hot dry summers and mild damp winters. Located along the Atlantic Ocean, Rabat has a mild, temperate climate, shifting from cool in winter to warm days in the summer months. The nights are always cool (or cold in winter, it can reach Sub 0 °C (32 °F) sometimes), with daytime temperatures generally rising about +7/8 C° (+15/18 F°). The winter highs typically reach only 17.2 °C (63.0 °F) in December–February. Summer daytime highs usually hover around 25 °C (77.0 °F), but may occasionally exceed 30 °C (86.0 °F), especially during heat waves. Summer nights are usually pleasant and cool, ranging between 11 °C (51.8 °F) and 19 °C (66.2 °F) and rarely exceeding 20 °C (68.0 °F). Rabat belongs to the sub-humid bioclimatic zone with an average annual precipitation of 560 mm.

Rabat's climate resembles the southwest coast of the Iberian Peninsula.

Culture

Hotel Balima

Hotel Balima

Mosquée As-sounah

Mosquée As-Sounah

The biggest place for theatre is the Theatre Mohammed V in the centre of the town.

The city has a few official galleries and an archeological museum.

Many organizations are active in cultural and social issues. Orient-Occident Foundation and ONA Foundation are the biggest of these. An independent art scene is active in the city. L'appartement 22, which is the first independent space for visual arts created by Abdellah Karroum, opened in 2002 and introduced international and local artists. Other independent spaces opened few years after, such as Le Cube, also set up in a private space.

Mawazine

Mawazine is a music festival in Rabat welcomed by Mohammed VI King of Morocco, that started in 2001 where music groups, fans and spectators come together in a week-long celebration of culture and music both locally and internationally. Musicians such as Scorpions, Rihanna, Elton John, Stromae and many others have performed at the festival.

Mawazine was host to more than 2,500,000 in 2013. Workshops are available for teaching dances and other arts. The festival is free. However, while most areas are free, there are those that require payment, specifically the smaller stages being the historical site of Chellah, the Mohammed V National Theater, and the Renaissance Cultural Center.[16]

Main sights

Porte el had Rabat

Bab El-Had Gate

Bab Rouah2

Bab-Rouah Gate

Bab Oudaïa porte de la Kasbah des Oudaias P1060309

Bab Oudaïa Gate

Lion and lioness at the zoo of Rabat, Morocco

Possible descendants of the Barbary lion at Rabat Zoo near the city

Notable people from Rabat

Politicians

Scientists, writers and philosophers:

Artists

Sportsmen

Royal descendants

Transport

Air

Rabat's main airport is Rabat–Salé Airport.

Trains

Train of Morocco
Rabat-Ville Railway Station

Rabat is served by two principal railway stations run by the national rail service, the ONCF.

Rabat-Ville is the main inter-city station, from which trains run south to Casablanca, Marrakech and El Jadida, north to Tanger, or east to Meknes, Fes, Taza and Oujda.

ONCF operates the Le Bouregreg urban rail for Rabat-Salé agglomeration.

Tram

The Rabat-Salé tramway is a tram system which was put into service on May 23, 2011 in the Moroccan cities of Rabat and Salé. The network has two lines for a total length of 19 km (12 miles) and 31 stops. It is operated by Veolia Transdev with Alstom Citadis trams.

Sports

Prince Moulay Abdellah Stadium (Arabic: مركب الأمير مولاي عبد لله) is a multi-purpose stadium in Rabat, Morocco. It is named after Prince Moulay Abdellah. It was built in 1983 and is the home ground of ASFAR (football club). It is used mostly for football matches, and it can also stage athletics. The stadium holds 52,000. Since 2008 it is host of the Meeting International Mohammed VI d'Athlétisme de Rabat.

Rabat will host the 2019 African Games after Malabo, Equatorial Guinea stripped out of hosting due to economical matters. It will be the first time in an African Games to be hosted by Morocco.

Football

The local football teams are:

Handball

  • ASFAR
  • FUS de Rabat
  • Le Stade Marocain

Basketball

The local basketball teams are:

  • ASFAR
  • FUS de Rabat
  • Moghreb de Rabat

Volleyball

  • ASFAR
  • FUS de Rabat
  • Crédit agricole Rabat

Gallery

Rabat, Chellah minaret 2

Chellah Minaret

Rabat Tour Hassan Mausolee

Tour Hassan and Mausoleum of Mohammed V

Avenue Mohammed V Rabat

Rabat, Mohammed V Avenue

Parliament of morocco

The Parliament building

Rabat SPOT 1104

Rabat as seen from Spot Satellite

Rabat downtown

Rabat downtown

Rabat-Salé airport

Rabat–Salé Airport

Coucher de soleil à quartier l'Océan

Sunset next to Quartier l'Océan

International relations

Twin towns—sister cities

Rabat is twinned with:

References

Notes
  1. ^ "Hong Kong Observatory". Hong Kong Observatory. Retrieved 2009-08-17.
  2. ^ a b c "Population légale d'après les résultats du RGPH 2014 sur le Bulletin officiel N° 6354" (pdf). Haut-Commissariat au Plan (in Arabic). Retrieved 2015-07-11.
  3. ^ "Décret fixant le nom des régions" (PDF). Portail National des Collectivités Territoriales (in French). Archived from the original (pdf) on 2015-05-18. Retrieved 2015-07-11.
  4. ^ "Top travel destinations for 2013 - CNN.com". Edition.cnn.com. 2013-01-02. Retrieved 2013-03-12.
  5. ^ "Abd al-Mumin facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Abd al-Mumin". www.encyclopedia.com. Retrieved 2017-12-22.
  6. ^ Kjeilen, Tore. "Rabat - LookLex Encyclopaedia". looklex.com. Retrieved 2017-12-22.
  7. ^ History of Morocco, Henri Terrasse, 1952
  8. ^ Levant, Yves; Maziane, Leïla (2017-01-02). "The Republic of Salé (1627–1641/1666); an alternative pirate organization model?". Management & Organizational History. 12 (1): 1–29. doi:10.1080/17449359.2017.1296773. ISSN 1744-9359.
  9. ^ "History of Morocco". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2017-12-22.
  10. ^ Morocco: The Islamist Awakening and Other Challenges 2005, Marvine Howe
  11. ^ Pike, John. "Sidi Slimane Air Base, Morocco - United States Nuclear Forces". Globalsecurity.org. Retrieved 2009-05-06.
  12. ^ Rabat, Morocco Page. Directory of Cities, Towns, and Regions in Morocco
  13. ^ "Rabat Climate Normals 1961–1990". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved October 14, 2016.
  14. ^ "Klimatafel von Rabat-Salé (Int. Flugh.) / Marokko" (PDF). Baseline climate means (1961–1990) from stations all over the world (in German). Deutscher Wetterdienst. Retrieved October 14, 2016.
  15. ^ "Station Rabat" (PDF) (in French). Météo Climat. Retrieved October 14, 2016.
  16. ^ Bill K. Anderson, Mawazine — The binding of cultures, the channeling of acceptance, http://digitaljournal.com/, 5 June 2014
  17. ^ "::Bethlehem Municipality::". www.bethlehem-city.org. Archived from the original on 2010-07-24. Retrieved 2009-10-10.
  18. ^ "Kardeş Şehirler". Bursa Büyükşehir Belediyesi Basın Koordinasyon Merkez. Tüm Hakları Saklıdır. Retrieved 2013-07-27.
  19. ^ "Guangzhou and Rabat sign sister city agreement". Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 17 March 2015.
  20. ^ "Lisboa - Geminações de Cidades e Vilas" [Lisbon - Twinning of Cities and Towns]. Associação Nacional de Municípios Portugueses [National Association of Portuguese Municipalities] (in Portuguese). Retrieved 2013-08-23.
  21. ^ "Acordos de Geminação, de Cooperação e/ou Amizade da Cidade de Lisboa" [Lisbon - Twinning Agreements, Cooperation and Friendship]. Camara Municipal de Lisboa (in Portuguese). Retrieved 2013-08-23.
  22. ^ "Mapa Mundi de las ciudades hermanadas". Ayuntamiento de Madrid. Archived from the original on 2012-05-26.
  23. ^ "AN^MAR - Red de Hermanamientos entre Ciudades Marroquies y Andaluzas - Convenios y hermanamientas". An-mar.org. 2006-05-01. Retrieved 2011-09-15.
  24. ^ "Cooperation Internationale" (in French). © 2003 City of Tunis Portal. Archived from the original on October 11, 2008. Retrieved 2009-01-31.

External links

Coordinates: 34°01′15″N 6°50′30″W / 34.020882°N 6.84165°W

ASFAR (football club)

The Association Sportive des Forces Armées Royales (Arabic: الجمعية الرياضية للقوات المسلحة الملكية‎; ASFAR), also known as the Royal Army Club (Arabic: نادي الجيش الملكي‎), is a professional sport club based in Morocco's capital city (Rabat-Sale).

The club was founded in 1958 soon after Morocco had gained their independence, and is one of the most famous football clubs in Morocco. ASFAR stands for French: Association Sportive des Forces Armées Royales, roughly translated to mean Sports Association the Royal Armed Forces. ASFAR is the most Successful team in Morocco with 29 titles in total, and has never been relegated to the Second Division, and is also the most popular team in Morocco because of their numerous fans inside and outside the country.

Abbas Jirari

Abbas Jirari (Arabic: عباس الجراري‎ born 15 February 1937 in Rabat), also known as Abbas al-Jarari, Abbas al-Jirari or Abbès Jirari, is a Moroccan intellectual and advisor to King Mohammed VI of Morocco.

Abdelhak Mrini

Abdelhak Mrini (also known as Abdelhak El Merini, also spelled as Lamrini or Lemrini; Arabic: عبد الحق المريني; born 31 May 1934, Rabat), is a Moroccan historian, civil servant and writer.

Botola

The Botola (Arabic: البطولة‎), literally "the Moroccan Championship" (known as Botola Maroc Telecom for sponsorship reasons) is a Moroccan professional league for men's association football clubs. At the top of the Moroccan football league system, it is the country's primary football competition. Contested by 16 clubs, it operates on a system of promotion and relegation with the Football League.

The Premier League is a corporation in which the 16 member clubs act as shareholders. Seasons run from August to May, with teams playing 30 matches each (playing each team in the league twice, home and away) totalling 214 matches in the season. Most games are played in the afternoons of Saturdays and Sundays, the other games during weekday evenings. It is sponsored by Maroc Télécom and thus known as the Botola-Ittisalat. Outside England, it is commonly referred to as the Moroccan Premier League (MPL).

The competition formed as the FRFM on 20 February 1992 following the decision of clubs in the Botola Pro to break away from the UNAF, which had been founded in 1911, and take advantage of a lucrative television rights deal. This deal is worth MAD 55 million a year domestically as of 2015–16, with Arryadia securing the domestic rights to broadcast games respectively. The league generates MAD 123 million per year in domestic and international television rights.

The Botola Pro is the most-watched football league in Africa, broadcasts in 153 territories to 54 million homes and a potential TV audience of 2 billion people. In the 2010–11 season, the average Botola Pro match attendance was 25,363, the highest of any professional football league in Africa, and stadium occupancy was 92% capacity. The Premier League ranked second in the CAF 5-Zaers of leagues based on performances in African competitions over the last five years.

Of the 16 clubs to have competed since the inception of the Premier League in 1992, five have won the title: Wydad Casablanca (14), Association Sportive des FAR (12), Raja de Casablanca (11), Magreb Fez (4) and Hašania Agadir (2). The current champions are Ittihad Tanger, who won the title in 2017-18.

°

On 5 June 2016 FUS Rabat won the football championship for the first time after being runner-up to the title for 5 previous times.

Clerical clothing

Clerical clothing is non-liturgical clothing worn exclusively by clergy. It is distinct from vestments in that it is not reserved specifically for services. Practices vary: is sometimes worn under vestments, and sometimes as the everyday clothing or street wear of a priest, minister, or other clergy member. In some cases, it can be similar or identical to the habit of a monk or nun.

In modern times, many Christian clergy have adopted the use of a shirt with a clerical collar.

Fath Union Sport

Fath Union Sport (Arabic: اتحاد الفتح الرياضي‎; commonly called FUS or FUS Rabat) is a Moroccan football club based in Rabat and currently playing in the first division. The club was founded on 10 April 1946. 'Fath Union Sport' is the name of the sports club which encompasses everything from Basketball to the game of Chess.

Hassan II of Morocco

King Hassan II (Arabic: الْحسْنُ الثاني بْن مُحَمَّدُ بْن يوسف بْن الْحسْنِ بْن الشَّرِيفِ بْن عَلِيُّ الْعَلَوِيِّ‎, MSA: (a)l-ḥasan aṯ-ṯānī, Maghrebi Arabic: el-ḥasan ett(s)âni); 9 July 1929 – 23 July 1999) was King of Morocco from 1961 until his death in 1999. He is descended from the Alaouite tribe. He was the eldest son of Mohammed V, Sultan, then King of Morocco (1909–1961), and his second wife, Lalla Abla bint Tahar (1909–1992). Hassan was known to be one of the most severe rulers of Morocco.

Mohammed V University

Mohammed V University (Arabic: جامعة محمد الخامس‎), in Rabat, Morocco, was founded in 1957 under a royal decree (Dahir). It is the first modern university in Morocco after the University of al-Qarawiyyin in Fez.

The university is named for Mohammed V, the former King of Morocco who died in 1961. In 1993, it was divided into two independent universities:

Mohammed V University at Agdal

Mohammed V University at SouissiIn 2015 the two universities merged into one, known as Mohammed V University, but maintaining the two campuses.

Morocco Open

The Morocco Open or Rabat Grand Prix (for sponsorship reasons called the Grand Prix de SAR La Princesse Lalla Meryem), is a women's professional tennis tournament currently held in Rabat, Morocco. This WTA Tour event is classified as an International tournament and is played on outdoor clay courts. It is the only WTA tournament held in Africa.

Morocco Tennis Tour – Rabat

The Morocco Tennis Tour – Rabat is a professional tennis tournament played on outdoor red clay courts. It is part of the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) Challenger Tour. It was held annually in Rabat, Morocco, from 2007-2012.

Rabat, Iran

Rabat (Persian: ربط‎, also Romanized as Rabaṭ) is a city in the north east of Sardasht County, West Azerbaijan Province, in road of sardast - mahabad Kurdistan of Iran. In 2015 , its population was 19,350, in 2,901 families.Peoples of rabat are Kurds that speak by Mokryan accent

History :

Rabat city has hostorical and ancient from Medes traces in Musasir temple .The major known ancient civilization in the region was that of Mannaeans, a buffer state between Urartian and Assyrian sphere of influence . Matiene was the name of a kingdom in northwestern Iran on the lands of the earlier kingdom of the Mannae. .

Rabat, Malta

Rabat (Maltese: Ir-Rabat, [ɪrˈrɐbɐt]) is a town in the Northern Region of Malta, with a population of 11,497 as of March 2014. The name of the town is derived from the Arabic word for 'suburb': الرباط, as it was the suburb of the old capital Mdina. Half of the present-day village core also formed part of the Roman city of Melite, before the latter was resized during the medieval period. The Apostolic Nunciature of the Holy See to the Republic of Malta is seated in this village. The Local Council of Rabat is also the administrator of Baħrija. Parts of the films Munich and Black Eagle were shot in Rabat. In December 1999, Mtarfa seceded from Rabat to form a separate Local Council by Act XXI, an amendment to the Local Council Act of 1993 (Act XV).

Rabat, Urmia

Rabat (Persian: ربط‎, also Romanized as Rabaţ) is a village in Beradust Rural District, Sumay-ye Beradust District, Urmia County, West Azerbaijan Province, Iran. At the 2006 census, its population was 194, in 36 families.

Rabat-Salé-Kénitra

Rabat-Salé-Kenitra (Arabic: الرباط-سلا-القنيطرة‎; Berber languages: Eṛṛbaṭ-Sla-Qniṭra) is one of the twelve administrative regions of Morocco. It is situated in north-western Morocco and has a population of 4,580,866 (2014 census). The capital is Rabat.

Rabat-les-Trois-Seigneurs

Rabat-les-Trois-Seigneurs is a commune in the Ariège department in the Midi Pyrénées region in southwestern France.

Rabat Ajax F.C.

Rabat Ajax Football Club is a Maltese football club based in Rabat. The last promotion to the Maltese Premier League was achieved in the 2011–12 season, when they earned promotion after finishing second behind Melita.

Rabat–Salé Airport

Salé Airport or Rabat–Salé Airport (IATA: RBA, ICAO: GMME) is an international airport located in the city of Salé, also serving Rabat, the capital city of Morocco and of the Rabat-Salé-Kénitra region. It is a joint use public and military airport, also hosting the First Air Base of the Royal Moroccan Air Force. The airport is located about 8 kilometres (5 mi) east-northeast of Rabat and about 90 km (56 mi) northeast of Casablanca.

During World War II, the airport was used as a military airfield by both the Royal Air Force and the United States Army Air Forces. The 319th Bombardment Group briefly flew B-26 Marauders from the airfield between 25 April - 1 June 1943. After the Americans moved out their combat units in mid-1943, the airport was used as a stopover and landing field for Air Transport Command aircraft on the Casablanca-Algiers transport route. When the war ended, control of the airfield was returned to civil authorities.

During the early years of the Cold War, the United States Air Force's Strategic Air Command (SAC) used the airport as headquarters for its 5th and 316th Air Divisions. Various SAC aircraft, primarily B-47 Stratojets and KC-97 Stratofreighters used the airport until the United States Air Force withdrew from Morocco in 1957.

Tito Rabat

Esteve "Tito" Rabat Bergada (born 25 May 1989) is a Spanish motorcycle racer who currently competes in the MotoGP class in the motorcycle World Championship. He is best known for winning the 2014 Moto2 World Championship with a record points total for the intermediate class.

Rabat suffered serious leg injuries in August 2018 after falling in heavy rain during practice for the British round at Silverstone. He was hit by a closely following out-of-control machine.He started racing professionally in 2005, and made his Grand Prix début at that season's Valencian Grand Prix.

Victoria, Gozo

Victoria (Maltese: Il-Belt Victoria, meaning "the city Victoria"), also known among the native Maltese as Rabat (which is the name of the old town centre) or by its title Città Victoria, is the capital city of Gozo, the second largest island of Malta. The city has a total population of 6,901 (as of March 2014), and by population, is the largest locality in Gozo.

The area around the town, situated on a hill near the centre of the island, has been settled since Neolithic times. Victoria is the name given on 10 June 1887 by the British government on the occasion of Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee, at the request of Pietro Monsignor Pace, Bishop of Gozo (Monsignor Pace later became Sir Pietro Monsignor Pace, Titular Archbishop of Rhodes and Bishop of Malta). However, many Gozitans, mainly older Gozitans, still often refer to it by the name Rabat. It is usually known as Rabat, Gozo to distinguish it from the town of Rabat on the main island of Malta.

Climate data for Rabat (Rabat–Salé Airport) 1961–1990, extremes 1943–present
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 30.0
(86.0)
31.0
(87.8)
35.8
(96.4)
37.6
(99.7)
43.0
(109.4)
43.7
(110.7)
47.2
(117.0)
45.8
(114.4)
42.3
(108.1)
38.0
(100.4)
35.1
(95.2)
30.0
(86.0)
47.2
(117.0)
Average high °C (°F) 17.2
(63.0)
17.7
(63.9)
19.2
(66.6)
20.0
(68.0)
22.1
(71.8)
24.1
(75.4)
26.8
(80.2)
27.1
(80.8)
26.4
(79.5)
24.0
(75.2)
20.6
(69.1)
17.7
(63.9)
21.9
(71.4)
Daily mean °C (°F) 12.6
(54.7)
13.1
(55.6)
14.2
(57.6)
15.2
(59.4)
17.4
(63.3)
19.8
(67.6)
22.2
(72.0)
22.4
(72.3)
21.5
(70.7)
19.0
(66.2)
15.9
(60.6)
13.2
(55.8)
17.2
(63.0)
Average low °C (°F) 8.0
(46.4)
8.6
(47.5)
9.2
(48.6)
10.4
(50.7)
12.7
(54.9)
15.4
(59.7)
17.6
(63.7)
17.7
(63.9)
16.7
(62.1)
14.1
(57.4)
11.1
(52.0)
8.7
(47.7)
12.5
(54.5)
Record low °C (°F) −3.2
(26.2)
−2.6
(27.3)
−0.4
(31.3)
3.8
(38.8)
5.3
(41.5)
9.0
(48.2)
10.0
(50.0)
11.0
(51.8)
10.0
(50.0)
7.0
(44.6)
0.0
(32.0)
0.3
(32.5)
−3.2
(26.2)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 77.2
(3.04)
74.1
(2.92)
60.9
(2.40)
62.0
(2.44)
25.3
(1.00)
6.7
(0.26)
0.5
(0.02)
1.3
(0.05)
5.7
(0.22)
43.6
(1.72)
96.7
(3.81)
100.9
(3.97)
554.9
(21.85)
Average precipitation days 9.9 9.8 9.0 8.7 5.7 2.4 0.3 0.4 2.4 6.4 10.2 10.4 75.6
Average relative humidity (%) 82 82 80 78 77 78 78 79 80 79 80 83 80
Mean monthly sunshine hours 179.9 182.3 232.0 254.5 290.5 287.6 314.7 307.0 261.1 235.1 190.5 180.9 2,916.1
Source #1: NOAA[13]
Source #2: Deutscher Wetterdienst (humidity, 1973–1993),[14] Meteo Climat (record highs and lows)[15]
Provinces and Prefectures
Cities
Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
Oriental
Fès-Meknès
Rabat-Salé-Kénitra
Béni Mellal-Khénifra
Casablanca-Settat
Marrakesh-Safi
Drâa-Tafilalet
Souss-Massa
Guelmim-Oued Noun
Laâyoune-Sakia El Hamra
Dakhla-Oued Ed-Dahab
Capitals of Arab countries
Capitals of African states
Northern
Central
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History
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Politics
Economy
Culture

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