Queen's Medal for Chiefs

The Queen's Medal for Chiefs is an award of the British Empire. The medal was established in 1920, during the colonial period. The medal was granted to the chiefs within the numerous African, Asian, American and Pacific colonies and mandated territories that made up the then very extensive British Empire. The medal is no longer awarded.

Medals were struck bearing the effigies of George V, George VI, and Elizabeth II. The earliest versions of the medal were worn on a silver chain. Later medals were suspended from a yellow ribbon with two white stripes for the gold medal and yellow with a single white center stripe for the silver medal.

Queen's Medal for Chiefs
Queen's Medal for Chiefs in Gold
Queen's Medal for Chiefs in Gold
Awarded by the Sovereign of the British Empire
TypeMedal
StatusNo longer awarded
Statistics
Established1920
Precedence
Next (higher)Queen's Volunteer Reserves Medal[1]
Next (lower)Badge of Honour[1]
Queen's Medal for Chiefs Ribbon

Queen's Medal for Chiefs in gold
Queen's Medal for Chiefs in Silver baton

Queen's Medal for Chiefs in silver

Medal designs

In 1920, the medal was a silver oval 67 mm by 50.2 mm on a silver chain 78 cm in length. The links of the chain took the form of Tudor roses, the royal monogram "GRI", and crowns. The design was by Sir Bertram Mackennal. On the obverse was the effigy of the King-Emperor George V surrounded by the inscription GEORGE V KING AND EMPEROR. The reverse depicts a freighter and a battleship in a tropical port.[2]

In 1953 the medal was a silver oval 67.8 mm by 50 mm on a silver chain 82 cm in length. The links were in the form of Tudor roses, the royal monogram "EIIR", and crowns. The obverse bears the effigy of Elizabeth II by Cecil Thomas surrounded by the inscription QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND. The reverse remained unchanged between versions.[3]

After 1953, the medals were hung from a yellow ribbon with white stripes. The medals followed the prior obverse and reverse designs but were of a smaller size, 49.9 mm by 33.9 mm. This medal was struck by the Royal Mint.[4]

References

  1. ^ a b "No. 62529". The London Gazette (Supplement). 11 January 2019. p. 327.
  2. ^ "George V Medal for Native Chiefs, 1920". Stack's. 18 January 2005. Retrieved 6 July 2012.
  3. ^ "Elizabeth II Medal for Native Chiefs, 1953". Stack's. 18 January 2005. Retrieved 6 July 2012.
  4. ^ "Elizabeth II Medal for Native Chiefs, 1953". Stack's. 18 January 2005. Retrieved 6 July 2012.
Africa Service Medal

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Badge of Honour

The Badge of Honour or Queen's Certificate and Badge of Honour is a civil award presented by the governments of British Overseas Territories. Established in 1928, it was presented to recognize loyal and valuable service by native chiefs and other non-European dignitaries within the British Empire. It is currently awarded for meritorious services to the local community of an exceptional or outstanding nature. The Certificate and Badge of Honour continues to be awarded in Gibraltar, the Falkland Islands, the Cayman Islands, and Bermuda.

Cape of Good Hope General Service Medal

The Cape of Good Hope General Service Medal is a British campaign medal which was awarded to members of the Cape Colonial Forces who took part in three campaigns in and around the Cape of Good Hope, in Basutoland in 1880–1881, in Transkei in 1880–1881 and in Bechuanaland in 1896–1897.

History of the Iban people

The oral history of the Iban has traditionally been committed to memory in the oral forms of literature i.e. inchantations (timang or pengap) and genealogies (tusut), and some of these are recorded in a system of writing on boards (papan turai) as pneumonics by the initiated shamans, or lemambang. This includes elaborate genealogical records, which usually go back about fifteen generations, although some purport to go back up to twenty-five. These genealogies (tusuts) are essentially records of who married who and whom begat whom. Sometimes a name is accompanied by a short description, a praise-name (ensumbar).

Some of the songs of the Iban people's oral history (such as the ritual pengap chant, sung during festivals) are mythological or historical accounts composing of major or key events or famous names.

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Lint voor Verwonding

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Medalje voor de Anglo-Boere Oorlog

The Medalje voor de Anglo-Boere Oorlog is a South African military campaign medal. It was instituted on 21 December 1920 as a retrospective award for Boer veteran officers and men who fought in the 1899–1902 Second Boer War.

Natal Native Rebellion Medal

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Queen's South Africa Medal

The Queen's South Africa Medal is a British campaign medal awarded to British and Colonial military personnel, and to civilians employed in an official capacity, who served in the Second Boer War in South Africa. Altogether twenty-six clasps were awarded, to indicate participation in particular actions and campaigns.

Queen's Volunteer Reserves Medal

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South Africa Medal (1853)

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South Africa Medal (1880)

The South Africa Medal (1880), often referred to as the Zulu War Medal, is a campaign medal which was instituted in 1880 and awarded by the British Government to members of the British Army, Royal Naval Brigade and Colonial Volunteers who were involved in a series of South African tribal wars in the Cape of Good Hope, Colony of Natal and Transvaal between 1877 and 1879, most notably for the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879.

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