Queen's Commendation for Bravery

The Queen's Commendation for Bravery and the Queen's Commendation for Bravery in the Air are United Kingdom awards,[1] open to both military personnel and civilians. They were established in 1994, when the award of the Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct and the Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air were discontinued.[2]

Queen's Commendation for Bravery
Queen's Commendation for Bravery in the Air
Queen's Commendation for Bravery

Queen's Commendation for Bravery
Queen’s Commendation for Bravery in the Air
Queen's Commendation for Bravery in the Air
Awarded by the United Kingdom
TypeBravery award
EligibilityBoth service personnel and civilians
Awarded forBravery not in action against an enemy
StatusCurrently awarded
DescriptionRibbon device in silver
Statistics
Established1994

Criteria

The two awards are granted for bravery entailing risk to life and meriting national recognition, but not to the standard required of the Queen's Gallantry Medal. Classed as 'level 4' awards by the Ministry of Defence, they are the lowest level of bravery award, alongside a mention in dispatches. The awards do not give rise to post-nominal letters.[3]

The Queen's Commendation for Bravery is open to both to civilians in peacetime conditions and to all ranks of the British Armed Forces for actions not in the presence of an enemy. It is denoted by a silver spray of laurel leaves.[4]

The Queen's Commendation for Bravery in the Air is awarded on the same basis, but for acts of bravery in the air. It is denoted by a flying eagle in silver.[4]

Queen’s Commendations can be awarded posthumously,[4] and are not restricted to British subjects.

Manner of wear

The holder is entitled to wear the appropriate device in a similar manner to a mention in despatches. If awarded for bravery in a theatre for which a campaign medal has been granted, it is worn on the ribbon of the appropriate medal. When awarded in peacetime conditions and when no medal is issued, the emblem is worn on the uniform or coat after any medal ribbons. Recipients with no medals wear the device in the position that a single medal would be worn.[5]

From 2003, in addition to British campaign medals, commendation and mention in despatches devices can be worn on United Nations, NATO and EU medals.[6] Originally only one commendation or mention in dispatches emblem of each category could be worn on any one medal ribbon.[7] In a change introduced in 2014, those with multiple awards may wear up to three of each commendation and mention in dispatch devices on a single campaign medal and ribbon bar.[8]

King's and Queen's Commendation awards

This table summarises the various King's and Queen's Commendations awarded by the United Kingdom:

Period For Bravery For Bravery (Air) For valuable service For valuable service (Air)
1939 - 1952[9] King's Commendation for
Brave Conduct
King’s Commendation for
Valuable Service in the Air
1952 - 1994[10] Queen's Commendation for
Brave Conduct
Queen’s Commendation for
Valuable Service in the Air
From 1994[2] Queen's Commendation for
Bravery
Queen's Commendation for
Bravery in the Air
Queen's Commendation for
Valuable Service

References

  1. ^ Military Honours and Awards, Ministry of Defence.
  2. ^ a b "London Gazette: 12 August 1994 Issue:53760 Page:11527".
  3. ^ "Honours and Awards in the Armed Forces (JSP 761) (V5.0 Oct 16). Appendix 1 to Annex A, page 1A1-2". MoD Joint Services Publication. Retrieved 21 June 2018.
  4. ^ a b c "Medals: campaigns, descriptions and eligibility". gov.uk. Retrieved 21 June 2018.
  5. ^ "No. 56878". The London Gazette (Supplement). 17 March 2003. p. 3355.
  6. ^ John Mussell (ed). Medal Yearbook 2015. p. 108. Published by Token Publishing Ltd. Honiton, Devon.
  7. ^ MOD, PS12 (January 2012). Army Dress Regulations (All Ranks) Part 13 (PDF). MOD. Retrieved 21 February 2015.
  8. ^ "Honours and Awards in the Armed Forces (JSP 761) (V5.0 Oct 16). Paras 12.02 and 12.19". MoD Joint Services Publication. Retrieved 21 June 2018.
  9. ^ "London Gazette: 24 July 1951 Supplement: 39294 Page:4035".
  10. ^ "London Gazette: 14 January 1958 Supplement: 41285 Page:365".
2014 Special Honours

As part of the British honours system, the Special Honours are issued at the Queen's pleasure at any given time. The Special Honours refer to the awards of the Order of the Garter, Order of the Thistle, Order of Merit, Royal Victorian Order and the Order of St John. Life Peerages are at times also awarded as special honours.

2015 Special Honours

As part of the British honours system, the Special Honours are issued at the Queen's pleasure at any given time. The Special Honours refer the award of the Order of the Garter, Order of the Thistle, Order of Merit, Royal Victorian Order and the Order of St John. Life Peers are at times also awarded as special honours.

2016 Special Honours

As part of the British honours system, Special Honours are issued at the Queen's pleasure at any given time. The Special Honours refer the award of the Order of the Garter, Order of the Thistle, Order of Merit, Royal Victorian Order and the Order of St John. Life peerages are at times also awarded as special honours.

2017 Special Honours

As part of the British honours system, Special Honours are issued at the Monarch's pleasure at any given time. The Special Honours refer to the awards made within royal prerogative, operational honours and other honours awarded outside the New Years Honours and Birthday Honours.

2018 Special Honours

As part of the British honours system, Special Honours are issued at the Monarch's pleasure at any given time. The Special Honours refer to the awards made within royal prerogative, operational honours and other honours awarded outside the New Years Honours and Birthday Honours.

2019 Special Honours

As part of the British honours system, Special Honours are issued at the Monarch's pleasure at any given time. The Special Honours refer to the awards made within royal prerogative, operational honours and other honours awarded outside the New Years Honours and Birthday Honours.

Ansett Airlines Flight 232

Ansett Airlines Flight 232, on Wednesday, 15 November 1972, was a trip from Adelaide, South Australia aboard a Fokker Friendship bound for Alice Springs, Northern Territory. It was the occasion of a hijacking which resulted in the perpetrator's death by suicide.

A male passenger, subsequently identified as Miloslav Hrabinec, a Czech migrant, had boarded the flight in Adelaide with a concealed sawn-off .22 ArmaLite rifle and a sheath knife strapped to his leg. About a half-hour before the scheduled landing time, as the flight was making its descent into Alice Springs Airport, he emerged from the lavatory, produced the gun and said to a flight attendant named Kaye Goreham, "This is a hijack". Hrabinec then forced his way into the cockpit, however the captain informed Hrabinec that he was unable to speak to him as he was too busy landing the plane. Hrabinec was informed by Goreham that he needed to be seated for landing and he complied. After the plane landed police commenced negotiations with the hijacker. According to Goreham's account, Hrabinec stated his motive was not financial (he asked for no money) but that he wanted to commit suicide in a spectacular way by parachuting into a remote location and surviving for as long as he could before killing himself. To this end he demanded a light aircraft, a parachute and a jumpsuit.A civilian pilot and flying instructor, the local Aero Club manager Ossie Watts, volunteered himself and his Cessna aircraft. An undercover police constable Paul Sandeman, posing as Watts' navigator, was also on board the Cessna. According to Watts, Hrabinec became suspicious upon seeing Sandeman and requested Goreham search Sandeman for weapons. Watts did so but did not inform the hijacker when he felt a small firearm Sandeman had hidden. Watts states that the policeman "went for his gun" and the hijacker shot Sandeman in hand and stomach. The hijacker ran off and Watts, who had been shown how to use a gun minutes earlier, began shooting. Police marksmen also opened fire and Hrabinec was wounded. Hrabinec then retreated to ditch where he fatally shot himself.Constable Sandeman was awarded the Queen's Commendation for Bravery.

Archie Duncan (actor)

Archie Duncan (26 May 1914 – 24 July 1979) was a Scottish actor born in Glasgow.Duncan's father was a regimental sergeant major in the army and his mother was a postmistress. He attended Glasgow's Govan High School and worked as a welder in Glasgow shipyards for a decade.He began his career in repertory theatre and West End plays. His professional acting debut was in Juno and the Paycock in May 1944 at the Alhambra Theatre, Glasgow.Although he appeared in over 50 television series and movie roles, he is best remembered for two: Inspector Lestrade in the 1954 series Sherlock Holmes:960 and as Little John in The Adventures of Robin Hood from 1955 to 1960.

Duncan was replaced in the Little John role by Rufus Cruikshank for 13 episodes after Duncan was injured when a horse bolted toward spectators, mostly children, watching the location filming of the episode "Checkmate" on 20 April 1955. He grabbed the bridle, stopping the horse, but the cart it was pulling ran him over, causing a fractured kneecap and cuts and bruises. He received the Queen's Commendation for Bravery Award and £1,360 in damages from Sapphire films.

He also played the ditch digger in the 1969 film Ring of Bright Water who dispatched the star otter Mij with his spade, towards the end.On July 24, 1979, Duncan died at home in London. He was 65.

Commendation

Commendation ceremony was a formal ceremony that evolved during the Early Medieval period to create a bond between a lord and his fighting man.

Commendation may also refer to:

the placing of an ecclesiastical benefice in commendam

Ulmus 'Morton Stalwart' Commendation, a Morton Arboretum hybrid cultivar

Commander-in-Chief Unit Commendation, a Canadian award given to military units

Commendation Medal, a mid-level United States military decoration

Commendation for Gallantry, a military decoration awarded to personnel of the Australian Defence Force

Meritorious Team Commendation, a unit award of the United States Coast Guard

Meritorious Unit Commendation, a mid-level unit award of the United States Armed Forces

Navy Unit Commendation, a United States Navy unit awardOfficial Commendation awards of the United Kingdom consist of:

King's and Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct, awarded 1939-1994

King's and Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air, awarded 1942-1994

Queen's Commendation for Bravery, awarded since 1994

Queen's Commendation for Bravery in the Air, awarded since 1994

Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service, awarded since 1994

Doug Beattie

Douglas Ricardo Beattie, MC (born 1965) is a British soldier and politician.

Hugh Hind

Hugh ‘Chuck’ Hind (died 28 January 1977) was a former SAS soldier who allegedly assassinated the Chairman of ZANU, Herbert Chitepo.Hind served with the British SAS during the 1960s, he was awarded the Queen's Commendation for Bravery for rescuing a young child from the River Wye in Hereford. Chuck Hind jumped into the water when it was flooded with heavy rains, after rescuing the child he revived the child with mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.Chuck Hind emigrated to Rhodesia and working with another Rhodesian Central Intelligence Organisation operative, known only as ‘Taffy’ Brice they performed a series of raids into Zambia against ZANU and ZAPU targets during the Rhodesian Bush War.‘Taffy’ and Chuck were assisted in Zambia by a white Zambian farmer Ian Robert Bruce Sutherland, who was later convicted by Zambian courts of illegally possessing offensive material at his farm in Mazabuka, Zambia.

Herbert Chitepo was assassinated, allegedly by Chuck Hind and ‘Taffy’ on 17 March 1975. They are said to have placed a car bomb in his Volkswagen Beetle. The explosion sent part of the car onto the roof of his house and uprooted a tree next door.Hind died in a road traffic accident, transporting weapons, whilst driving near Lusaka with Sutherland also in the car, the vehicle skidded and left the road.

Sutherland’s farm was raided on 22 November 1978 by Zambian police and in the trial that followed his arrest he was sentenced to 4 years imprisonment.

Orders, decorations, and medals of Hong Kong

The existing Hong Kong honours system was created after transfer of government of Hong Kong to the People's Republic of China as a special administrative region in 1997. Before that, Hong Kong was a British dependent territory and followed the British honours system. The HKSAR Government does not maintain any records of pre 1997 awards including gallantry awards.

Parsons Green train bombing

On 15 September 2017, at around 8:20 am BST (07:20 UTC), an explosion occurred on a District line train at Parsons Green Underground station, in London, England. Thirty people were treated in hospital or an urgent care centre, mostly for burn injuries, by a botched crude 'bucket bomb' with a timer containing the TATP explosive chemical. Police arrested the main suspect, 18-year-old Iraqi refugee Ahmed Hassan in a departure area of the Port of Dover the next day, and subsequently raided several addresses including the foster home of an elderly couple in Sunbury-on-Thames where Hassan had lived.Hassan arrived in the UK illegally in October 2015 and had said that he had been compelled to undergo training by ISIL with about 1,000 other young people and he had feared members of his family would be killed if he had attempted to resist. The incident was classified by Europol as a case of jihadist terrorism. On 6 April 2019 it was announced that Lt. Col. Craig Palmer, a passenger on the affected tube train, had been awarded the Queen's Commendation for Bravery for his part in helping to bring the bomber to trial and conviction.

Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct

The Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct, formerly the King's Commendation for Brave Conduct, acknowledged brave acts by both civilians and members of the armed services in both war and peace, for gallantry not in the presence of an enemy. Established by King George VI in 1939, the award was discontinued in 1994 on the institution of the Queen's Commendation for Bravery.

It represented the lowest level of bravery award in the British honours system, alongside a mention in despatches. There is no entitlement to post-nominal letters.

Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service

The Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service is a British military award for meritorious service in an operational theatre. It was established in 1994, when the award of the Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct and the Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air were discontinued.

Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air

The Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air, formerly the King's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air, was a merit award for flying service awarded by the United Kingdom between 1942 and 1994.

Queen's Gallantry Medal

The Queen's Gallantry Medal (QGM) is a United Kingdom decoration awarded for exemplary acts of bravery by civilians, and by members of the Armed Forces "not in the face of the enemy", where the services were not so outstanding as to merit the George Cross or the George Medal, but above the level required for the Queen's Commendation for Bravery.

Ray Cochrane

Ray Cochrane (born 18 June 1957 in Banbridge, County Down, Northern Ireland) is a retired Northern Irish horse racing jockey and current sports agent.

Cochrane was the winning jockey in three of the five British Classic Races: the 1,000 Guineas Stakes and Oaks Stakes on Midway Lady, trained by Ben Hanbury in 1986, and the Epsom Derby Stakes on Kahyasi for his retained stable of Luca Cumani in 1988. Cochrane was also second in The 2000 Guineas on Chief Singer in 1984 and won the Group 1 July Cup at Newmarket and The Sussex Stakes at Goodwood on the same horse. Ray received a Flat Jockey Special Recognition Lester Award in 2000.

Ray received the Queen's Commendation for Bravery in 2002 for saving the life of fellow jockey Frankie Dettori following a plane crash in 2000.

Star Breeze

Star Breeze (formerly Seabourn Spirit) is a German-built cruise ship completed in 1989. The luxury liner travels between Europe and Africa, and is owned by Windstar Cruises. In early 2005 she was rated the best small cruise ship by Condé Nast. In April 2015, she departed the Seabourn fleet, and on 6 May 2015 she was rechristened and entered service with Windstar Cruises.

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