Putout

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by one of the following methods:

  • Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout)
  • Catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a force out)
  • Catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play
  • Catching a third strike (a strikeout)
  • Catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout)
  • Being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference
Baseball Play-at-first
An attempted putout at first base.

All-time records

Career records

  1. Jake Beckley: 23,709
  2. Cap Anson: 21,695
  3. Ed Konetchy: 21,361
  4. Eddie Murray: 21,255
  5. Charlie Grimm: 20,711
  6. Stuffy McInnis: 19,962
  7. Mickey Vernon: 19,808
  8. Jake Daubert: 19,634
  9. Lou Gehrig: 19,510
  10. Joe Kuhel: 19,386

Single season records

Pitchers

  1. Dave Foutz: 57 (1886)
  2. Tony Mullane: 54 (1882)
  3. George Bradley: 50 (1876)
  4. Guy Hecker: 50 (1884)
  5. Mike Boddicker: 49 (1984)
  6. Larry Corcoran: 47 (1884)
  7. Al Spalding: 45 (1876)
  8. Ted Breitenstein: 45 (1895)
  9. Jim Devlin: 44 (1876)
  10. Dave Foutz: 44 (1887)
  11. Bill Hutchinson: 44 (1890)

Catchers

  1. Johnny Edwards: 1,135 (Houston Astros, 1969)
  2. Yadier Molina: 1,113 (St. Louis Cardinals, 2016)[1]
  3. Yadier Molina: 1,082 (St. Louis Cardinals, 2017)[1]
  4. Russell Martin: 1,065 (Los Angeles Dodgers, 2007)
  5. Yadier Molina: 1,064 (St. Louis Cardinals, 2015)[1]
  6. Mike Piazza: 1,055 (Los Angeles Dodgers, 1996)
  7. Dan Wilson: 1,050 (Seattle Mariners, 1997)
  8. Mike Piazza: 1,045 (Los Angeles Dodgers, 1997)
  9. Michael Barrett: 1,035 (Chicago Cubs, 2004)
  10. Jason Kendall: 1,015 (Pittsburgh Pirates, 1998)

First basemen

  1. Jiggs Donahue: 1,846 (1907)
  2. George Kelly: 1,759 (1920)
  3. Phil Todt: 1,755 (1926)
  4. Wally Pipp: 1,710 (1926)
  5. Jiggs Donahue: 1,697 (1906)
  6. Candy LaChance: 1,691 (1904)
  7. Tom Jones: 1,687 (1907)
  8. Ernie Banks: 1,682 (1965)
  9. Wally Pipp: 1,667 (1922)
  10. Lou Gehrig: 1,662 (1927)

Second basemen

  1. Bid McPhee: 529 (1886)
  2. Bobby Grich: 484 (1974)
  3. Bucky Harris: 483 (1922)
  4. Nellie Fox: 478 (1956)
  5. Lou Bierbauer: 472 (1889)
  6. Billy Herman: 466 (1933)
  7. Bill Wambsganss: 463 (1924)
  8. Cub Stricker: 461 (1887)
  9. Buddy Myer: 460 (1935)
  10. Bill Sweeney: 459 (1912)

Third basemen

  1. Denny Lyons: 255 (Philadelphia Athletics, 1887)
  2. Jimmy Williams: 251 (Pittsburgh Pirates, 1899)
  3. Jimmy Collins: 251 (Boston Beaneaters [National League], 1900)
  4. Jimmy Collins: 243 (Boston Beaneaters [National League], 1898)
  5. Willie Kamm: 243 (Chicago White Sox, 1928)
  6. Willie Kamm: 236 (Chicago White Sox, 1927)
  7. Frank Baker: 233 (Philadelphia Athletics, 1913)
  8. Bill Coughlin: 232 (Washington Senators, 1901)
  9. Ernie Courtney: 229 (Philadelphia Phillies, 1905)
  10. Jimmy Austin: 228 (St. Louis Browns, 1911)

Shortstops

  1. Donie Bush: 425 (Detroit Tigers, 1914)
  2. Hughie Jennings: 425 (Baltimore Orioles [National League], 1895)
  3. Joe Cassidy: 408 (Washington Senators, 1905)
  4. Rabbit Maranville: 407 (Boston Braves, 1914)
  5. Dave Bancroft: 405 (New York Giants, 1922)
  6. Eddie Miller: 405 (Boston Braves, 1940)
  7. Monte Cross: 404 (Philadelphia Phillies, 1898)
  8. Dave Bancroft: 396 (New York Giants, 1921)
  9. Mickey Doolan: 395 (Philadelphia Phillies, 1906)
  10. Buck Weaver: 392 (Chicago White Sox, 1913)

Left fielders

  1. Joe Vosmik: 432 (Cleveland Indians, 1932)
  2. Rickey Henderson: 407 (Oakland Athletics, 1980)
  3. Elmer Valo: 395 (Philadelphia Athletics, 1949)
  4. Ralph Kiner: 390 (Pittsburgh Pirates, 1947)
  5. Bobby Veach: 384 (Detroit Tigers, 1921)
  6. Ben Oglivie: 384 (Milwaukee Brewers, 1980)
  7. Ralph Kiner: 382 (Pittsburgh Pirates, 1948)

Center fielders

  1. Taylor Douthit: 547 (1928)
  2. Richie Ashburn: 538 (1951)
  3. Richie Ashburn: 514 (1949)
  4. Chet Lemon: 512 (1977)
  5. Dwayne Murphy: 507 (1980)
  6. Dom DiMaggio: 503 (1948)
  7. Richie Ashburn: 503 (1956)
  8. Richie Ashburn: 502 (1957)
  9. Richie Ashburn: 496 (1953)
  10. Richie Ashburn: 495 (1958)

Right fielders

  1. Babe Ruth: 392 (1932)
  2. Al Kaline: 387 (1961)
  3. Dave Parker: 381 (1977)
  4. Ichiro Suzuki: 381 (2005)
  5. Ichiro Suzuki: 379 (2004)
  6. Austin Kearns: 374 (2007)
  7. Hunter Pence: 374 (2013)

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Yadier Molina Stats - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
Assist (baseball)

In baseball, an assist (denoted by A) is a defensive statistic, baseball being one of the few sports in which the defensive team controls the ball. An assist is credited to every defensive player who fields or touches the ball (after it has been hit by the batter) prior to the recording of a putout, even if the contact was unintentional. For example, if a ball strikes a player's leg and bounces off him to another fielder, who tags the baserunner, the first player is credited with an assist. A fielder can receive a maximum of one assist per out recorded. An assist is also credited if a putout would have occurred, had another fielder not committed an error. For example, a shortstop might field a ground ball cleanly, but the first baseman might drop his throw. In this case, an error would be charged to the first baseman, and the shortstop would be credited with an assist.

If a pitcher records a strikeout where the third strike is caught by the catcher, the pitcher is not credited with an assist. However, if the batter becomes a baserunner on a dropped third strike and the pitcher is involved in recording a putout by fielding the ball and either tagging the runner out or throwing to first base for the out, the pitcher is credited with an assist just as any other fielder would be.

Assists are an important statistic for outfielders, as a play often occurs when a baserunner on the opposing team attempts to advance on the basepaths when the ball is hit to the outfield (even on a caught fly ball that results in an out; see tag up). It is the outfielder's job to field the ball and make an accurate throw to another fielder who is covering the base before the runner reaches it. The fielder then attempts to tag the runner out. This is especially important if the runner was trying to reach home plate, as the assist and tag prevent the baserunner from scoring a run. Assists are much rarer for outfielders than infielders (with the exception of first basemen) because the play is harder to make, and also because outfielder assist situations occur less often than the traditional ground-ball assist for a shortstop, second baseman, or third baseman. However, as a result, outfield assists are worth far more than infield assists, and tell more about an outfielder's throwing arm than infielder assists do.

In recent years, some sabermetricians have begun referring to assists by outfielders as baserunner kills. Some sabermetricians are also using baserunner holds as a statistic to measure outfield arms.

A baserunner hold occurs when the baserunner does not attempt to advance an extra base on an outfielder out of concern of being thrown out by a strong, accurate throw. This can be combined with baserunner kills for better accuracy, as runners often do not try for an extra base when an outfielder with an excellent arm is playing.

Charlie Marshall (baseball)

Charles Anthony Marshall [born Charles Anthony Marczlewicz] (August 28, 1919 – April 15, 2007) was a catcher in Major League Baseball who played for the St. Louis Cardinals during the 1941 season. A native of Wilmington, Delaware, he batted and threw right-handed. He was nicknamed Chick.

Marshall was a major league player whose career, statistically speaking, was only slightly different from that of Eddie Gaedel or Moonlight Graham. On June 14, 1941, he caught for the Cardinals and collected a putout in his only fielding chance. He did not have a batting appearance and never played a major league game again.

Marshall died in his homeland of Wilmington, Delaware, at age 87.

Gene McAuliffe

Eugene Leo McAuliffe (February 28, 1872 – April 29, 1953) was a Major League Baseball catcher who played for the Boston Beaneaters in 1904. The 32-year-old rookie stood 6'1" and weighed 180 lb.

On August 17, 1904, McAuliffe got into a home game against the Chicago Cubs at South End Grounds. He was 1-for-2 (.500) at the plate, and behind the plate he had one putout, one assist, and one error for a fielding percentage of .667.

He died in his hometown of Randolph, Massachusetts, aged 81.

Heinie Odom

Herman Boyd "Heinie" Odom (October 13, 1900 – August 31, 1970) was an American third baseman in Major League Baseball who played a single game with the New York Yankees in 1925. He was born and died in Rusk, Texas. He was born Herman Boyd, and later changed his name.

After attending the University of Texas, Odom played his only major league game with the Yankees on April 22, 1925. He hit a single in his one and only at bat and finished with a perfect 1.000 batting average. In the field, he had one putout and no errors, for a perfect 1.000 fielding percentage.

List of Major League Baseball career assists leaders

In baseball, an assist (denoted by A) is a defensive statistic, baseball being one of the few sports in which the defensive team controls the ball. An assist is credited to every defensive player who fields or touches the ball (after it has been hit by the batter) prior to the recording of a putout, even if the contact was unintentional. For example, if a ball strikes a player's leg and bounces off him to another fielder, who tags the baserunner, the first player is credited with an assist. A fielder can receive a maximum of one assist per out recorded. An assist is also credited if a putout would have occurred, had another fielder not committed an error. For example, a shortstop might field a ground ball cleanly, but the first baseman might drop his throw. In this case, an error would be charged to the first baseman, and the shortstop would be credited with an assist.

Rabbit Maranville is the all-time leader with 8,967 career assists. Ozzie Smith (8,375), Cal Ripken Jr. (8,214), Bill Dahlen (8,138), Omar Vizquel (8,050), and Luis Aparicio (8,016) are the only other players to record more than 8,000 career assists.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a catcher leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a Force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

Catcher is a position for a baseball or softball player. When a batter takes his/her turn to hit, the catcher crouches behind home plate, in front of the (home) umpire, and receives the ball from the pitcher. In addition to these primary duties, the catcher is also called upon to master many other skills in order to field the position well. The role of the catcher is similar to that of the wicket-keeper in cricket.

Iván Rodríguez is the all-time leader in putouts at the catcher position with 14,864 career. Rodríguez is the only catcher to record more than 14,000 career putouts. Yadier Molina (13,057) and Jason Kendall (13,019) are the only other catchers to record more than 13,000 career putouts.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a center fielder leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

A center fielder, abbreviated CF, is the outfielder in baseball who plays defense in center field – the baseball fielding position between left field and right field. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the center fielder is assigned the number 8.

Willie Mays is the all-time leader in putouts as a center fielder with 7,029 career. Mays is the only center fielder to record more than 7,000 career putouts as a center fielder.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a first baseman leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a force-out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

First base, or 1B, is the first of four stations on a baseball diamond which must be touched in succession by a baserunner in order to score a run for that player's team. A first baseman is the player on the team playing defense who fields the area nearest first base, and is responsible for the majority of plays made at that base.

Jake Beckley is the all-time leader in career putouts as a first baseman with 23,731. Cap Anson (21,699), Ed Konetchy (21,361), Eddie Murray (21,255), and Charlie Grimm (20,711) are the only other players to record 20,000 career putouts.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a left fielder leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

In baseball, a left fielder (LF) is an outfielder who plays defense in left field. Left field is the area of the outfield to the left of a person standing at home plate and facing towards the pitcher's mound. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the left fielder is assigned the number 7.

Barry Bonds is the all-time leader in putouts a left fielder with 5,225 career. Rickey Henderson (5,215) is second all-time and then only other left fielder with over 5,000 career putouts.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a pitcher leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a Force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the pitcher is assigned the number 1. The pitcher is often considered the most important defensive player, and as such is situated at the right end of the defensive spectrum. There are many different types of pitchers, such as the starting pitcher, relief pitcher, middle reliever, lefty specialist, setup man, and closer.

Greg Maddux is the all-time leader in putouts by a pitcher with 546 career. Maddux is the only pitcher to record more than 400 and 500 career putouts.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a right fielder leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

A right fielder, abbreviated RF, is the outfielder in baseball or softball who plays defense in right field. Right field is the area of the outfield to the right of a person standing at home plate and facing towards the pitcher's mound. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the right fielder is assigned the number 9.

Paul Waner is the all-time leader in putouts by a right fielder with 4,740 career. Roberto Clemente (4,454), Dwight Evans (4,247), Hank Aaron (4,163), Tony Gwynn (4,052), Sammy Sosa (4,019), and Ichiro Suzuki (4,006) are the only other right fielders to record over 4,000 career putouts.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a second baseman leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a Force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

In baseball and softball, second baseman is a fielding position in the infield, between third and first base. The second baseman often possesses quick hands and feet, needs the ability to get rid of the ball quickly, and must be able to make the pivot on a double play. In addition, second basemen are usually right-handed; only four left-handed throwing players have ever played second base since 1950. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the second baseman is assigned the number 4.

Bid McPhee is the all-time leader in career putouts as a second baseman with 6,552. Eddie Collins (6,526) and Nellie Fox (6,090) are the only other second basemen with over 6,000 career putouts.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a shortstop leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a Force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

Shortstop, abbreviated SS, is the baseball or softball fielding position between second and third base, which is considered to be among the most demanding defensive positions. The position is mostly filled by defensive specialists, so shortstops are generally relatively poor batters who bat later in the batting order, with some exceptions. In the numbering system used by scorers to record defensive plays, the shortstop is assigned the number 6.

Rabbit Maranville is the all-time leader in career putouts as a shortstop with 5,139. Maranville is the only shortstop to record more than 5,000 career putouts.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a third baseman leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a Force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

A third baseman, abbreviated 3B, is the player in baseball whose responsibility is to defend the area nearest to third base — the third of four bases a baserunner must touch in succession to score a run. In the scoring system used to record defensive plays, the third baseman is assigned the number '5'.

The third baseman requires good reflexes in reacting to batted balls, as he or she is often the closest infielder (roughly 90–120 feet) to the batter. The third base position requires a strong and accurate arm, as the third baseman often makes long throws to first base. The third baseman sometimes must throw quickly to second base in time to start a double play. The third baseman must also field fly balls in fair and foul territory.

Brooks Robinson is the all-time leader in career putouts as a third baseman with 2,697. Robinson is the only third baseman with more than 2,500 career putouts.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a Force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

Jake Beckley is the all-time leader in career putouts with 23,743. Cap Anson (22,572), Ed Konetchy (21,378), Eddie Murray (21,265), Charlie Grimm (20,722), and Stuffy McInnis (20,120) are the only other players to record 20,000 career putouts.

Out (baseball)

In baseball, an out occurs when the umpire rules a batter or baserunner out for one of the reasons given below. When three outs are recorded in an inning, a team's half of the inning (their turn at batting), ends.

To signal an out, an umpire generally makes a fist with one hand, and then flexes that arm either upward, particularly on pop flies, or forward, particularly on routine plays at first base. Home plate umpires often use a "punch-out" motion to signal a called third strike.

Range factor

Range Factor (commonly abbreviated RF) is a baseball statistic developed by Bill James. It is calculated by dividing putouts and assists by the number of innings or games played at a given defense position. The statistic is premised on the notion that the total number of outs in which a player participates is more relevant in evaluating that player's defensive play than the percentage of cleanly handled chances as calculated by the conventional statistic fielding percentage.

However, some positions (especially first baseman) may have substantially more putouts because of a superior infield around them that commits fewer errors and turns many double plays, allowing them to receive credit for more putouts. Also, catchers who have a lot of strikeout pitchers on their team will have a high range factor, because the catcher gets the putout on a strikeout if the batter does not reach base.

Safe (baseball)

In baseball, a baserunner is safe when he reaches a base without being put out by various ways. While a runner is touching a base, he is usually not in jeopardy of being put out, and is thus "safe" from fielders' actions. The runner is in jeopardy once again, negating this safety, when he ceases touching the base, when forced on a force play, or when the runner commits interference.

By the rules, a runner is safe when he is entitled to the base he is trying for. Umpires will signal that a runner is safe by extending their elbows to their sides and then extending their arms fully to the side. For emphasis, an umpire may fully cross and extend his arms several times to indicate safe. Verbally, the umpire will usually simply say "safe". If a close play occurs that may have appeared to be a putout, the umpire will also call a reason for the safe call, such as "he dropped the ball" or "he missed the tag".

Calling safe is a subjective decision which is better made using the sounds of the runner hitting the bag and the fielder catching the ball, rather than by sight.

Shortstop

Shortstop, abbreviated SS, is the baseball or softball fielding position between second and third base, which is considered to be among the most demanding defensive positions. Historically the position was assigned to defensive specialists who were typically poor at batting and were often placed at the bottom of the batting order. Today shortstops are often able to hit well and many are placed at the top of the lineup. In the numbering system used by scorers to record defensive plays, the shortstop is assigned the number 6.

More hit balls go to the shortstop than to any other position, as there are more right-handed hitters in baseball than left-handed hitters, and most hitters have a tendency to pull the ball slightly. Like a second baseman, a shortstop must be agile, for example when performing a 4-6-3 double play. Also, like a third baseman, the shortstop fields balls hit to the left side of the infield, where a strong arm is needed to throw out a batter-runner before they reach the safety of first base.

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