Psychedelic film

Psychedelic film is a film genre characterized by the influence of psychedelia and the experiences of psychedelic drugs. Psychedelic films typically contain visual distortion and experimental narratives, often emphasizing psychedelic imagery. They might reference drugs directly, or merely present a distorted reality resembling the effects of psychedelic drugs. Their experimental narratives often purposefully try to distort the viewers' understanding of reality or normality.[1][2]

Subgenres

  • The Acid Western was a style of Western popular in the 1960s and 1970s that use psychedelic imagery or allusions.[3]

Film Examples

TV Show Examples

See also

References

  1. ^ "25 Great Psychedelic Movies That Are Worth Your Time". Taste Of Cinema - Movie Reviews and Classic Movie Lists.
  2. ^ "The 100 best animated movies: the best psychedelic movies". Time Out New York.
  3. ^ Rosenbaum, Jonathan (1996-06-26). "Acid Western: Dead Man". Chicago Reader.
  4. ^ Complex Mag (5 March 2010). "What A Trip! The Greatest Psychedelic Movies of All Time". Complex.
Acid Tests

The Acid Tests were a series of parties held by author Ken Kesey primarily in the San Francisco Bay Area during the mid-1960s, centered entirely on the use of, and advocacy of, the psychedelic drug LSD, also known as "acid". LSD was not made illegal in California until October 6, 1966.The name "Acid Test" was coined by Kesey, after the term "acid test" used by gold miners in the 1850s. He began throwing parties at his farm at La Honda, California. The Merry Pranksters were central to organizing the Acid Tests, including Pranksters such as Lee Quarnstrom and Neal Cassady. Other people, such as LSD chemists Owsley Stanley and Tim Scully, were involved as well.

Kesey took the parties to public places, and advertised with posters that read, "CAN YOU PASS THE ACID TEST?", and the name was later popularized in Tom Wolfe's 1968 book, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Musical performances by the Grateful Dead were commonplace, along with black lights, strobe lights, and fluorescent paint. The Acid Tests are notable for their influence on the LSD-based counterculture of the San Francisco area and subsequent transition from the beat generation to the hippie movement. The Jefferson Airplane song "A Song for All Seasons" (from Volunteers) mentions the Acid Tests.

Bad trip

A bad trip (acute intoxication from hallucinogens — "bad trip", drug-induced temporary psychosis, psychedelic crisis, or emergence phenomenon) is a frightening and unpleasant experience triggered by psychoactive drugs, especially psychedelic drugs such as LSD and magic mushrooms.

The features of a bad trip can range from feelings of mild anxiety and alienation to profoundly abject terror, ultimate entrapment, or complete loss of self-identity. Psychedelic specialists in the therapeutic community do not necessarily consider unpleasant experiences as threatening or negative, instead focusing on their potential to greatly benefit the user when properly resolved. Bad trips can be exacerbated by the inexperience or irresponsibility of the user or the lack of proper preparation and environment for the trip, and are reflective of unresolved psychological tensions triggered during the course of the experience.It is suggested that, at a minimum, such crises be managed by preventing the individual from harming oneself or others by whatever means necessary up to and including physical restraint, providing the patient with a safe and comfortable space, and supervising the intake until all effects of the drug have completely worn off.

Cyberdelic

Cyberdelic (a portmanteau word combining prefix "cyber-" and "psychedelic") is a term used to refer to either:

Immersion in cyberspace as a psychedelic experience.

The fusion of cyberculture and the psychedelic subculture into a new counterculture of the 1980s and 1990s.

Psychedelic art created by calculating fractal objects and representing the calculation results as still images, animations, music, or other media.

Rave dance parties where DJs and other performers play psychedelic trance music, with the accompaniment of laser light shows, projected images, and artificial fog. Attendees often use "club drugs".

Empathogen–entactogen

Empathogens or entactogens are a class of psychoactive drugs that produce experiences of emotional communion, oneness, relatedness, emotional openness—that is, empathy or sympathy—as particularly observed and reported for experiences with 3,4- Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). This class of drug is distinguished from the classes of hallucinogen or psychedelic, and amphetamine or stimulant. Major members of this class include MDMA, MDA, MDEA, MDOH, MBDB, 6-APB, methylone, mephedrone, αMT, and αET, MDAI among others. Most entactogens are phenethylamines and amphetamines, although several, such as αMT and αET, are tryptamines. When referring to MDMA and its counterparts, the term MDxx is often used (with the exception of MDPV). Entactogens are sometimes incorrectly referred to as hallucinogens or stimulants, although many entactogens such as ecstasy exhibit psychedelic or stimulant properties as well.

In the First Place

"In the First Place" is a song by the English rock group the Remo Four. It was released as a single in January 1999 to accompany the re-release of the 1968 psychedelic film Wonderwall, directed by Joe Massot. The song was written by Colin Manley and Tony Ashton of the Remo Four and recorded in London in January 1968 during the sessions for George Harrison's Wonderwall Music soundtrack album. Having produced the track for the band, Harrison unearthed the recording 30 years later when supplying Massot with the master tapes for the film's music. Ashton and the Remo Four's drummer, Roy Dyke, also recorded the song with their subsequent group, Ashton, Gardner and Dyke, in 1969.

A psychedelic pop song, "In the First Place" has been likened by some commentators to Harrison's 1967 Beatles track "Blue Jay Way". Massot sequenced the rediscovered recording as the opening track in his 1999 director's cut of Wonderwall. Backed by a new mix of the song, carried out by Paul Hicks, the single was issued to help pay for the cancer treatment being undergone by Manley, who died three months after its release. In 2014, the Remo Four version was included as a bonus track on the Apple Years reissue of Wonderwall Music.

LSD art

LSD art is any art or visual displays inspired by psychedelic experiences and hallucinations known to follow the ingestion of LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide, which also often colloquially known as "acid" or "azid"). Artists and scientists have been interested in the effect of LSD on drawing and painting since it first became available for legal use and general consumption.LSD causes visual hallucinations, audiovisual synaesthesia, and experiences of de-realisation. When these effects are mixed with an artist, they often illustrate their hallucinations.

Lazy Days (Gram Parsons song)

"Lazy Days" is a 1967 song by Gram Parsons which he recorded with three groups: The International Submarine Band, The Byrds in 1968 and The Flying Burrito Bros. in 1970.

The song was originally recorded for The International Submarine Band's cameo appearance in Roger Corman's psychedelic film, The Trip (1967) but was replaced with music by The Electric Flag. The recording with The Byrds was not released till the Byrds box set and the 1997 reissue of Sweetheart of the Rodeo. The recording with The Flying Burrito Bros. was released on a single in 1970 and on Burrito Deluxe. A performance of the song by The Flying Burrito Bros. can be seen on the DVD Festival Express, although Parsons was no longer in the band at this time.

Native American Church

The Native American Church (NAC), also known as Peyotism and Peyote Religion, is a Native American religion that teaches a combination of traditional Native American beliefs and Christianity, with sacramental use of the entheogen peyote. The religion originated in the U.S. State of Oklahoma in the late nineteenth century after peyote was introduced to the southern Great Plains from Mexico. Today it is the most widespread indigenous religion among Native Americans in the United States (except Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians), Canada (specifically First Nations people in Saskatchewan and Alberta), and Mexico, with an estimated 250,000 adherents as of the late twentieth century.

Neo-psychedelia

Neo-psychedelia is a diverse genre of psychedelic music that originated in the 1970s as an outgrowth of the British post-punk scene, also called acid punk. Its practitioners drew from the unusual sounds of 1960s psychedelia, either updating or copying the approaches from that era. After post-punk, neo-psychedelia flourished into a more widespread and international movement of artists who applied the spirit of psychedelic rock to new sounds and techniques. Neo-psychedelia may also include forays into psychedelic pop, jangly guitar rock, heavily distorted free-form jams, or recording experiments. A wave of British alternative rock in the early 1990s spawned the subgenres dream pop and shoegazing.

Peyote song

Peyote songs are a form of Native American music, now most often performed as part of the Native American Church. They are typically accompanied by a rattle and water drum, and are used in a ceremonial aspect during the sacramental taking of peyote.

Psych-Out

Psych-Out is a 1968 counterculture-era psychedelic film about hippies, psychedelic music, and recreational drugs starring Susan Strasberg, Jack Nicholson (the movie's leading man despite being billed under supporting player Dean Stockwell), and Bruce Dern, and produced and released by American International Pictures. Originally scripted as The Love Children, the title when tested caused people to think it was about bastards, so Samuel Z. Arkoff came up with the ultimate title based on a recent successful reissue of Psycho. The cinematographer was László Kovács.

Director Richard Rush's cut came in at 101 minutes and was edited to 82 minutes by the producers. This version is the one released on DVD. For some reason, when HBO Video released the film on VHS, they used a 98-minute version. On February 17, 2015 a 101-minute Director's cut was released on DVD and Blu-Ray. The majority of the songs in the movie and on the original soundtrack album were performed by the Storybook. This credit is never mentioned on movie posters and articles. They were a local band from the San Fernando Valley.

Psychedelic era

The Psychedelic era was the time of social, musical and artistic change influenced by psychedelic drugs, occurring between the years of 1965–69 or the early 1960s to the mid-1970s. Psychedelic drug use encouraged unity, the breaking down of boundaries, the heightening of political awareness, empathy with others, and the questioning of authority..

Writers who explored the potentials of consciousness exploration in the psychedelic era included Alan Watts, Timothy Leary, Ralph Metzner, and Ram Dass among others; an important journal of the time was The Psychedelic Review.

Psychedelic literature

This is a list of psychedelic literature, works related to psychedelic drugs and the psychedelic experience. Psychedelic literature has also been defined as textual works that arose from the proliferation of psychiatric and psychotherapeutic research with hallucinogens during the 1950s and early 1960s in North America and Europe.

Psychedelic microdosing

Psychedelic microdosing is a practice to use sub-threshold doses of psychedelic drugs in an attempt to improve creativity, boost physical energy level, emotional balance, increase performance on problems-solving tasks and to treat anxiety, depression and addiction. A microdose is usually a tenth of an active dose of psychedelic drugs. This practice has become more widespread in the 21st century.In 2018, a group of scientists at Imperial College London announced a self-blinding study recruiting volunteers across the globe via Internet, using questionnaires and games to evaluate psychological well-being and cognitive function effects of psychedelic microdosing.

Psychedelic pop

Psychedelic pop is pop music that contains musical characteristics associated with psychedelic music. This includes "trippy" effects such as fuzz guitars, tape manipulation, sitars, backwards recording, and Beach Boys-style harmonies. Blended with pop, they create melodic songs with tight song structures. It reached its peak during the late 1960s, and declined rapidly in the early 1970s.

Stoner film

Stoner film is a subgenre of comedy films that revolve around the use of cannabis. Generally, cannabis use is one of the main themes and inspires much of the plot. They are often representative of cannabis culture.

The Trip (1967 film)

The Trip (1967) is a counterculture-era psychedelic film released by American International Pictures, directed by Roger Corman, written by Jack Nicholson, and shot on location in and around Los Angeles, including on top of Kirkwood in Laurel Canyon, Hollywood Hills, and near Big Sur, California in 1967. Peter Fonda stars as a young television commercial director named Paul Groves.

Wonderwall (film)

Wonderwall is a 1968 psychedelic film by first-time director Joe Massot that stars Jane Birkin, Jack MacGowran, and Iain Quarrier, and features Richard Wattis and Irene Handl, and a cameo by Dutch collective The Fool, who were also set designers for the film.

The film is also remembered for its soundtrack, composed by then-Beatle George Harrison.

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