Providence County, Rhode Island

Providence County is the most populous county in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. As of the 2010 census, the county's population was 626,667, or 59.5% of the state's population.[1] Providence County contains the city of Providence, the state capital of Rhode Island and the county's (and state's) most populous city, with an estimated 179,219 residents in 2016.[2] Providence County is included in the Providence-Warwick, RI-MA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which in turn constitutes a portion of the greater Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area. In 2010, the center of population of Rhode Island was located in Providence County, in the city of Cranston.[3]

Providence County, Rhode Island
County
Providence20June07WWIMonument
Providence County Courthouse
Map of Rhode Island highlighting Providence County

Location within the U.S. state of Rhode Island
Map of the United States highlighting Rhode Island

Rhode Island's location within the U.S.
FoundedJune 22, 1703
SeatProvidence (1703-1842)
Largest cityProvidence
Area
 • Total436 sq mi (1,129 km2)
 • Land410 sq mi (1,062 km2)
 • Water26 sq mi (67 km2), 6.0%
Population (est.)
 • (2018)636,084
 • Density1,545/sq mi (596.5/km2)
Congressional districts1st, 2nd
Time zoneEastern: UTC−5/−4

History

Providence County was constituted on June 22, 1703, as the County of Providence Plantations. It consisted of five towns, namely Providence, Warwick, Westerly, Kingstown, and Greenwich and encompassed territory in present-day Kent and Washington counties. Washington County was split off as King's County in 1729, while Kent County was split off in 1750. The town of Cumberland was acquired from Massachusetts and added to Providence County in 1746-47, and the towns of East Providence and Pawtucket were made part of Providence County when the final border with Massachusetts was settled in 1862. County government in Rhode Island was abolished in 1842. Providence County, like other counties in Rhode Island, has no governmental functions (other than as court administrative and sheriff corrections boundaries which are part of state government).

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 436 square miles (1,130 km2), of which 410 square miles (1,100 km2) is land and 26 square miles (67 km2) (6.0%) is water.[4] It is the largest of Rhode Island's five counties by land area. The county is drained by the Blackstone River, which runs partly along the east border, the Woonasquatucket River in the central part of the county, joining with the smaller Moshassuck River in downtown Providence, and the Pawtuxet, which forms a portion of the southeastern boundary of the county.[5] The Pawtuxet is dammed in the western part of the county to form the Scituate Reservoir, which supplies drinking water for Providence and surrounding communities.

The highest natural point in the county and the state of Rhode Island is Jerimoth Hill at 812 feet (247 m). Sea level is the lowest point.

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
179024,376
180025,8546.1%
181030,86919.4%
182035,73615.8%
183047,01831.6%
184058,07323.5%
185087,52650.7%
1860107,79923.2%
1870149,19038.4%
1880197,87432.6%
1890255,12328.9%
1900328,68328.8%
1910424,35329.1%
1920475,19012.0%
1930540,01613.6%
1940550,2981.9%
1950574,9734.5%
1960568,778−1.1%
1970580,2612.0%
1980571,349−1.5%
1990596,2704.4%
2000621,6024.2%
2010626,6670.8%
Est. 2018636,084[6]1.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2018[1]

2000 census

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 621,602 people, 239,936 households, and 152,839 families residing in the county. The population density was 1,504 people per square mile (581/km²). There were 253,214 housing units at an average density of 613 per square mile (237/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 78.38% White, 6.55% Black or African American, 0.51% Native American, 2.90% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 8.02% from other races, and 3.58% from two or more races. 13.39% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 19.0% were of Italian, 10.9% Irish, 8.1% French, 7.7% Portuguese, 7.2% French Canadian and 5.8% English ancestry according to Census 2000. 72.7% spoke English, 13.4% Spanish, 4.9% Portuguese, 2.5% French and 1.6% Italian as their first language.

There were 239,936 households out of which 30.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.50% were married couples living together, 14.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.30% were non-families. 29.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the county, the population was spread out with 24.00% under the age of 18, 11.10% from 18 to 24, 29.80% from 25 to 44, 20.50% from 45 to 64, and 14.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $36,950, and the median income for a family was $46,694. Males had a median income of $35,336 versus $26,322 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,255. About 11.90% of families and 15.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.30% of those under age 18 and 12.70% of those age 65 or over.

Providence County is 71% Catholic, making it among the most Catholic counties in the country.[12]

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 626,667 people, 241,717 households, and 149,691 families residing in the county.[13] The population density was 1,530.3 inhabitants per square mile (590.9/km2). There were 264,835 housing units at an average density of 646.7 per square mile (249.7/km2).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 73.4% white, 8.5% black or African American, 3.7% Asian, 0.7% American Indian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 9.6% from other races, and 4.2% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 18.8% of the population.[13] The largest ancestry groups were:

  • Italy 18.5% Italian
  • Republic of Ireland 15.8% Irish
  • France 12.3% French
  • England 9.4% English
  • Portugal 8.6% Portuguese
  • Quebec 5.4% French Canadian
  • Dominican Republic 5.4% Dominican
  • Puerto Rico 4.9% Puerto Rican
  • Cape Verde 4.3% Cape Verdean
  • Germany 4.2% German
  • Poland 3.8% Polish
  • Guatemala 2.9% Guatemalan
  • Scotland 1.7% Scottish
  • United States 1.6% American
  • Sweden 1.2% Swedish
  • Colombia 1.2% Colombian
  • Mexico 1.1% Mexican
  • Northern Ireland 1.0% Scotch-Irish
  • Arab League 1.0% Arab

[15]

Of the 241,717 households, 31.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.8% were married couples living together, 15.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 38.1% were non-families, and 30.2% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.11. The median age was 37.0 years.[13]

The median income for a household in the county was $48,500 and the median income for a family was $61,265. Males had a median income of $44,964 versus $36,447 for females. The per capita income for the county was $25,169. About 11.6% of families and 15.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.1% of those under age 18 and 11.5% of those age 65 or over.[16]

Communities

Map of Providence County Rhode Island With Municipal Labels
Map of Providence County, Rhode Island showing cities, towns, and CDPs

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Other villages

Politics

Given it's urban nature, Providence County normally votes democratic. The last time a Republican candidate carried the county was in 1972, by Richard Nixon. The county was won by a very narrow margin, however.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  2. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  3. ^ "Centers of Population by State: 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  5. ^ Wikisource Ripley, George; Dana, Charles A., eds. (1879). "Providence, the N. county of Rhode Island" . The American Cyclopædia.
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 6, 2019.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  9. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  12. ^ "Adherents.com: Catholics". www.adherents.com. Retrieved 18 March 2018.
  13. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.
  15. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.
  16. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.
  17. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 18 March 2018.

Coordinates: 41°52′N 71°35′W / 41.87°N 71.58°W

Albion, Rhode Island

Albion is a village and historic district in Lincoln, Rhode Island, in the United States.

Albion is home to several mill buildings, churches, and the Kirkbrae Country Club golf course. The historic Blackstone River flows through the center of the mill village with a walking path running along the river. Albion Falls is a waterfall along the Blackstone River, and the Albion Bridge crosses the river just downstream from Albion Dam, built in 1916 to power Albion Mill, now a condominium complex. The word "Albion", from which the mill and village take their name, is the oldest name for Great Britain. The still-active Providence and Worcester Railroad passes through Albion.

Blackstone Canal

The Blackstone Canal was a waterway linking Worcester, Massachusetts, to Providence, Rhode Island (and Narragansett Bay) through the Blackstone Valley via a series of locks and canals during the early 19th century.

Chepachet, Rhode Island

Chepachet is a village and census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Glocester in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Rhode Island. It is centered at the intersection of U.S. Route 44 (a.k.a. Putnam Pike) and Rhode Island Route 102 (also known as Victory Highway and Chopmist Hill Road). Chepachet's ZIP code is 02814. As of the 2010 census, the CDP had a population of 1,675.

Forestdale, Rhode Island

Forestdale is a village and historic district in North Smithfield, Providence County, Rhode Island, United States, one-half mile from Slatersville, Rhode Island. The historic district runs east and west along Main Street and north on Maple Avenue. School Street is the primary road through the village, and the one-room school house for which the street is named still stands. The Branch River runs through the valley adjacent to the School Street. The Village Haven Restaurant and local VFW chapter are also located in the village.

Foster Center, Rhode Island

Foster Center is a village in the town of Foster, Rhode Island, United States. It was listed as a census-designated place (CDP) in 2010, with a population of 355. Historic elements of the village are included in the Foster Center Historic District, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The district features various colonial and Greek Revival houses as well as the still functioning town building from the late 18th century. The district was added to the National Register of Historic Places on May 11, 1974.

Georgiaville, Rhode Island

Georgiaville is a village in Smithfield, Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. The village was named after the Georgia Cotton Manufacturing Company mill located in the area. The Georgiaville Pond Beach is located in the village and is a popular recreation spot. In the 1920s the Ku Klux Klan was active in the area, and Klan rallies were held in Georgiaville.[1] The village, which has retained many features of its origin as a mid-19th century mill village including the mill complex and several blocks of mill worker housing, was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. Georgiaville is also where Smithfield's town hall is located.

Harrisville, Rhode Island

Harrisville is a census-designated place (CDP) and village in the town of Burrillville in Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. The population was 1,605 at the 2010 census. Much of the community composes a historic district listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The village was named after nineteenth century manufacturer, Andrew Harris. Previously, the village was named Rhodesville, after Captain William Rhodes, an eighteenth century privateer.

Lake Washington (Providence County, Rhode Island)

Lake Washington is a lake in the town of Glocester, Providence County, Rhode Island.

Lime Rock, Rhode Island

Lime Rock (Limerock) is a village and historic district in Lincoln, Providence County, Rhode Island, United States, near Rhode Island Route 146. The village was named after the limestone quarries in the area, which started in the 17th century, and continue to the present where Conklin Limestone Company now operates. Because of the abundance of limestone in the area many houses had massive end chimneys and were called "stone enders," a distinctly Rhode Island style of architecture. The historic district includes 21 historically significant properties in an area extending from Wilbur Road (formerly Jeremiah Smith Hill Road), just west of its junction with Old Louisquisset Pike, eastward to Great Road, and then along Great Road as far as Simon Sayles Road. Among these properties are three quarries, and the ruins of three old lime kilns. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.

Miscoe Lake

Miscoe Lake is a reservoir in Cumberland, Providence County, Rhode Island. It is about 0.8 miles (1.3 km) long and the northern tip of the lake lies in Wrentham, Norfolk County, Massachusetts. At normal levels it has a surface area of 49 acres (20 ha). It has also been known as Grants Mills Pond and Miso Meadow Pond.Much of the lake is surrounded by private property and can only be accessed by residents.

The lake is home to many wildlife species, including beavers, swans, herons, cormorants, turtles, and is a temporary habitat for Canada geese.

Located at the southern part of the lake is historical Grant's Mill. It resides on Miscoe Lake Dam, also known as Grants Mill Pond Dam, which was built in 1937. The dam's height is 14 feet (4.3 m) with a length of 75 feet (23 m), and maximum discharge is 70 cubic feet (2.0 m3) per second. Its capacity is 244 acre feet with normal storage of 226 acre feet. The dam drains an area of 3 square miles (7.8 km2).

National Register of Historic Places listings in Providence County, Rhode Island

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Providence County, Rhode Island.

This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. Latitude and longitude coordinates are provided for many National Register properties and districts; these locations may be seen together in a map.There are 426 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county, including 15 National Historic Landmarks. The cities of Pawtucket and Providence include 55 and 166 of these properties and districts — including 1 and 12 National Historic Landmarks — respectively; they are listed separately. Properties and districts located in the county's other municipalities, including 2 National Historic Landmarks, are listed here. The Blackstone Canal, which extends through Providence, Pawtucket, and other communities appears here and on the Providence and Pawtucket lists; the Conant Thread-Coats & Clark Mill Complex District is in both Central Falls and Pawtucket, and is thus listed below and on the Pawtucket list. The Norwood Avenue Historic District is located in both Providence and Cranston.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted June 14, 2019.

North Providence, Rhode Island

North Providence is a town in Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. The population was 32,078 at the 2010 census.

Oakland, Rhode Island

Oakland is a village in Burrillville, Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. It was developed in the 19th century at the site of a stone mill (now surviving only in fragmentary ruins) near the confluence of the Chepachet and Clear Rivers. It is one of the few remaining stone mills in this state. Most of the village is included in the Oakland Historic District, a historic district listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Most of the housing in the village was originally built to house mill workers, although there are several more elaborate houses built for mill executives.Students living in Oakland attend Burrillville Middle and High School. Oakland is a small, yet beautiful community hidden in the top left corner of Rhode Island. Oakland offers many woodland areas and rivers. The small town relies on volunteer firefighters. Each day a town whistle sounds from the Oakland-Mapleville Fire Department at five-o'clock pm, as well as each time fire personnel is in need. Many historic mills are scattered throughout the town, as well as mill-style neighborhoods.

Quinnville, Rhode Island

Quinnville is a village incorporated into the Town of Lincoln, Rhode Island. It is the smallest of the seven villages within Lincoln, bordered by the villages of Albion at the north, Limerock to the west, Lonsdale to the south, and by the Blackstone River to the east.

Runnins River

The Runnins River is a river in the U.S. states of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. It flows approximately 14 km (9 mi).

Smithville – North Scituate, Rhode Island

North Scituate is a village in the town of Scituate, Rhode Island. Since 1967, the village has been home to the Scituate Art Festival.Much of the community is included in a historic district on the Danielson Pike and West Greenville Road. The district contains many nineteenth-century buildings, including the Old Congregational Church (1834) and Smithville Seminary (1839). The district was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.The zip code for the village is 02857. The zip code is assigned to the name "North Scituate". The zip code extends not only into Scituate but also Glocester, Rhode Island to the north.

St. Charles Borromeo Church Complex (Woonsocket, Rhode Island)

The St. Charles Borromeo Church Complex is an historic Roman Catholic Church in Woonsocket, Rhode Island on North Main Street within the Diocese of Providence.

St. Matthew's Church (Central Falls, Rhode Island)

St. Matthew's Church, currently known as the Holy Spirit Parish, is an historic Roman Catholic church at 1030 Dexter Street in Central Falls, Rhode Island located within the Diocese of Providence.

Wallum Lake

Wallum Lake is a 322-acre (1.30 km2) lake that lies in Burrillville, Providence County, Rhode Island and Douglas, Worcester County, Massachusetts. It is adjacent to Douglas State Forest and Wallum Lake Park.

There are two paved boat ramps: one at the north end off Wallum Lake Road, Douglas, Massachusetts, the second at the southern extreme in Burrillville, Rhode Island. A study reported ten species of fish, based upon a 1994 summer sampling. Largemouth bass, yellow perch and bluegills are common. Additional species present included pumpkinseed, chain pickerel, landlocked alewife, brood salmon and eels. Licenses from either state are valid, but Rhode Island regulations apply.Wallum Lake has been stocked with rainbow trout and brown trout. Rainbow trout are stocked on a put-and-take basis, and the state of Rhode Island has stocked numerous landlocked salmon and occasionally broodstock salmon.

Places adjacent to Providence County, Rhode Island
Municipalities and communities of Providence County, Rhode Island, United States
Cities
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