Prophets of Christianity

In Christianity the figures widely recognised as prophets are those mentioned as such in the Old Testament and the New Testament. It is believed that prophets are chosen and called by God.

The main list below consists of only those individuals that have been clearly defined as prophets, either by explicit statement or strong contextual implication, (e.g. the purported authors of the books listed as the major prophets and minor prophets) along with the Biblical reference to their office.

In Roman Catholicism, prophets are recognised as having received either public or private revelation. Public revelation is part of the "deposit of faith", which refers to the entire revelation of Jesus Christ passed to successive generations in the forms of sacred scripture (the Bible) and sacred tradition.[1]

The secondary list consists of those individuals who are recorded as having had a visionary or prophetic experience, but without a history of any major or consistent prophetic calling. A final list contains the names of those described in the Bible as prophets, but are presented as either misusing this gift or as fraudulent.

Mattia Preti - San Giovanni Battista Predicazione
St. John the Baptist Preaching, c. 1665, by Mattia Preti

Main list by alphabetical order

A

B

D

E

G

H

I

Schnorr von Carolsfeld Bibel in Bildern 1860 139
The Vision of Isaiah is depicted in this 1860 woodcut by Julius Schnorr von Karolsfeld

J

SA 160-Jeremia op de puinhopen van Jeruzalem
Horace Vernet, Jeremiah on the ruins of Jerusalem (1844)

L

M

N

O

P

S

T

U

Z

Secondary list

False prophets

Unnamed prophets and men of God

See also

References

  1. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg G. H. Joyce (1913). "Revelation" . In Herbermann, Charles (ed.). Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.
Bible prophecy

Bible prophecy or biblical prophecy comprises the passages of the Bible that supposedly reflect communications from God to humans through prophets. Jews, Christians and Muslims usually consider the biblical prophets to have received revelations from God.

Prophetic passages—inspirations, interpretations, admonitions or predictions—appear widely distributed throughout Biblical narratives. Some future-looking prophecies in the Bible are conditional, with the conditions either implicitly assumed or explicitly stated.

In general, believers in biblical prophecy engage in exegesis and hermeneutics of scriptures which they believe contain descriptions of global politics, natural disasters, the future of the nation of Israel, the coming of a Messiah and of a Messianic Kingdom—as well as the ultimate destiny of humankind.

Lyngsjö Church

Lyngsjö Church (Swedish: Lyngsjö kyrka) is a medieval church in Lyngsjö, in the province of Skåne, Sweden. The well-preserved medieval church contains an unusual, Romanesque antependium of gilt copper of unknown origin.

Prophecy

A prophecy is a message that is claimed by a prophet to have been communicated to them by a god. Such messages typically involve inspiration, interpretation, or revelation of divine will concerning the prophet's social world and events to come (compare divine knowledge). All known ancient cultures had prophets who delivered prophecies.

Prophets and messengers in Islam

Prophets in Islam (Arabic: ٱلْأَنۢبِيَاء فِي ٱلْإِسْلَام‎‎, romanized: nabī, lit. 'prophet' pl. الأنبياء,نب‎ anbiyāʼ) are individuals who Muslims believe were sent by God to various communities in order to serve as examples of ideal human behavior and to spread God's message on Earth. Some prophets are categorized as messengers (Arabic: رسل‎, romanized: rasūl pl. رسول‎ rasl), those who transmit divine revelation through the intercession of an angel. Muslims believe that many prophets existed, including many not mentioned in the Qur'an. The Qur'an states: "There is a Messenger for every community". Belief in the Islamic prophets is one of the six articles of the Islamic faith.Muslims believe that the first prophet was also the first human being, Adam (آدَم), created by Allah. Many of the revelations delivered by the 48 prophets in Judaism and many prophets of Christianity are mentioned as such in the Qur'an but usually in slightly different forms. For example, the Jewish Elisha is called Eliyas, Job is Ayyub, Jesus is Isa, etc. The Torah given to Moses (Musa) is called Tawrat, the Psalms given to David (Dawud) is the Zabur, the Gospel given to Jesus is Injil.The final and most important prophet in Islam is Muhammad (Muhammad ibn ʿAbdullāh), who Muslims believe to be the "Seal of the Prophets" (Khatam an-Nabiyyin, i.e. the last prophet), to whom the Qur'an was revealed in a series of revelations (and written down by his companions). Muslims believe the Qur'an is the sole divine and literal word of God, thus immutable and protected from distortion and corruption, destined to remain in its true form until the Last Day.Although Muhammad is considered the last prophet, some Muslim traditions also recognize and venerate saints (though some modern schools, such as Salafism and Wahhabism, reject the theory of sainthood).In Islam, every prophet preached the same core beliefs, the Oneness of God, worshipping of that one God, avoidance of idolatry and sin, and the belief in the Day of Resurrection or the Day of Judgement and life after death. Prophets and messengers are believed to have been sent by God to different communities during different periods in history.

In Islam there is a tradition of prophetic lineage, particularly with regard to the prophet Abraham (Ibrahim) who had many prophets in his lineage - Jesus (Isa), Zakariyyah, Muhammad, David (Dawud)), etc. - through his sons Ismael and Isaac.

Prophets in Judaism

The 48 prophets and seven prophetesses of Judaism, according to Rashi. The last Jewish prophet is believed to have been Malachi. In Jewish tradition it is believed that the period of prophecy, called Nevuah, ended with Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi at which time the "Holy Spirit departed from Israel".

Table of prophets of Abrahamic religions

This is a table containing prophets of the modern Abrahamic religions.

Prophets in the New Testament
Canonical gospels
Acts of the Apostles
Epistles and Revelation

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