Proceedings of the Royal Society

Proceedings of the Royal Society is the parent title of two scientific journals published by the Royal Society. Originally a single journal, it was split into two separate journals in 1905:

The two journals are the Royal Society's main research journals. Many celebrated names in science have published their research in the Proceedings of the Royal Society, including Paul Dirac,[1] Werner Heisenberg,[2] Ernest Rutherford,[3] and Erwin Schrödinger.[4]

All articles are available free at the journals' websites after one year for Proceedings B and two years for Proceedings A. Authors may have their articles made immediately open access (under Creative Commons license) on payment of an article processing charge.

Proceedings of the Royal Society of London
LanguageEnglish
Publication details
Publication history
1800–1904
Publisher
Royal Society (United Kingdom)
Standard abbreviations
Proc. Royal Soc. Lond.
Proc R Soc Lond
Indexing
ISSN0370-1662
Links

History

The journal started out in 1800 as the Abstracts of the Papers Printed in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. The Royal Society published four volumes, from 1800 to 1843. Volumes 5 and 6, which appeared from 1843 to 1854, were called Abstracts of the Papers Communicated to the Royal Society of London. Starting with volume 7, in 1854, the Proceedings first appeared under the name Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Publication of the proceedings in this form continued to volume 75 in 1905.[5]

Starting with volume 76, the Proceedings were split into

  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Containing Papers of a Mathematical and Physical Character
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Containing Papers of a Biological Character.

The Proceedings have since undergone further name changes. As of 2017, the two series are called

  • Proceedings of the Royal Society A — Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society B — Biological Sciences.

Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences

Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
Proceedings A November 2015 cover
DisciplineNatural sciences
LanguageEnglish
Edited byMark Welland[6]
Publication details
Publication history
1905-present
Publisher
Royal Society (United Kingdom)
FrequencyMonthly
Hybrid
2.410
Standard abbreviations
Proc. Royal Soc. A
Indexing
ISSN1364-5021 (print)
1471-2946 (web)
LCCN96660116
OCLC no.610206090
Links

Proceedings of the Royal Society A publishes peer-reviewed research articles in the mathematical, physical, and engineering sciences. As of 2017 editor-in-chief is Professor Sir Mark Welland[6][7] FRS. According to Journal Citation Reports, as of 2018 the journal has a impact factor of 2.410[8]

The journal is abstracted and indexed by Applied Mechanics Reviews, GeoRef, British and Irish Archaeological Bibliography, Chemical Abstracts, Chemistry Citation Index, Composites Alert, Compumath Citation Index, Current Contents, Engineered Materials Abstracts, Engineering Index Monthly, Excerpta Medica, Fluidex, Forest Products Abstracts, Geographical Abstracts, Human Geography, Geological Abstracts, Geomechanics Abstracts, Index to Scientific Reviews, Inspec, Mass Spectrometry Bulletin, Mathematical Reviews, Metals Abstracts, Metals Abstracts Index, Mineralogical Abstracts, Nonferrous Metals Alert, Oceanographic Literature Review, Petroleum Abstracts, Polymers, Ceramics, Research Alert (Philadelphia), Science Citation Index, Steels Alert, and World Aluminum Abstracts.

Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
1822 cover-source
DisciplineBiology
LanguageEnglish
Edited bySpencer Barrett[9]
Publication details
Publication history
1905-present
Publisher
Royal Society (United Kingdom)
FrequencyBiweekly
Hybrid
4.847
Standard abbreviations
Proc. Royal Soc. B
Indexing
ISSN0962-8452 (print)
1471-2954 (web)
LCCN92656221
OCLC no.1764614
Links

Proceedings of the Royal Society B publishes research related to biological sciences. As of 2017 the editor-in-chief is Professor Spencer Barrett.[9][10] Topics covered in particular include ecology, behavioural ecology and evolutionary biology, as well as epidemiology, human biology, neuroscience, palaeontology, psychology, and biomechanics. The journal publishes predominately research articles and reviews, as well as comments, replies, and commentaries. In 2005, Biology Letters (originally a supplement to Proceedings B), was launched as an independent journal publishing short articles from across biology. According to Journal Citation Reports, As of 2018 the journal has an impact factor of 4.847.[11]

References

  1. ^ Dirac, P. a. M. (1931). "Quantised Singularities in the Electromagnetic Field". Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences. 133 (821): 60–72. Bibcode:1931RSPSA.133...60D. doi:10.1098/rspa.1931.0130.
  2. ^ Heisenberg, W. (1948). "On the Theory of Statistical and Isotropic Turbulence". Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences. 195 (1042): 402–406. Bibcode:1948RSPSA.195..402H. doi:10.1098/rspa.1948.0127.
  3. ^ Oliphant, M. L. E.; Kempton, A. E.; Rutherford, Lord (1935). "Some Nuclear Transformations of Beryllium and Boron, and the Masses of the Light Elements". Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences. 150 (869): 241–258. Bibcode:1935RSPSA.150..241O. doi:10.1098/rspa.1935.0099.
  4. ^ Schrodinger, E. (1955). "The Wave Equation for Spin 1 in Hamiltonian Form. II". Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences. 232 (1191): 435–447. Bibcode:1955RSPSA.232..435S. doi:10.1098/rspa.1955.0229.
  5. ^ "About Proceedings A | Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences". rspa.royalsocietypublishing.org. Retrieved 2015-10-07.
  6. ^ a b Welland, Mark (2017). "Editorial January 2017". Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences. 473 (2197): 20160897. Bibcode:2017RSPSA.47360897W. doi:10.1098/rspa.2016.0897. PMC 5312137. PMID 28265201.
  7. ^ "Editorial Board | Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences". Rspa.royalsocietypublishing.org. Retrieved 2017-03-23.
  8. ^ "Proceedings of the Royal Society A". 2017 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Science ed.). Clarivate Analytics. 2018.
  9. ^ a b Barrett, Spencer C. H. (2017). "Proceedings B 2016: the year in review". Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 284 (1846): 20162633. doi:10.1098/rspb.2016.2633. PMC 5247507. PMID 28053056.
  10. ^ "Editorial board | Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences". Rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org. Retrieved 2017-03-23.
  11. ^ "Proceedings of the Royal Society B". 2018 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Science ed.). Clarivate Analytics. 2017.
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Edward Sang

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Joseph Larmor

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Proceedings of the Royal Society of Queensland is a multidisciplinary scientific journal published by the Royal Society of Queensland. It was established in 1884.Volumes of the journal are typically published annually, although this schedule has varied over time as the resources of The Royal Society of Queensland have allowed. There are currently 121 published volumes of the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Queensland. Volume 122 is currently in preparation and is scheduled for publication in late 2017.

While the scope of The Royal Society of Queensland encompasses all of science, including the social sciences that follow scientific method, the scope of the journal is more limited, being restricted to the natural sciences. However, 'natural sciences' is itself interpreted broadly and also, the journal publishes papers on science policy, science education and science opinion.

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In 2014, The Royal Society of Queensland undertook a major project to digitise all past issues of the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Queensland, The Transactions of the Philosophical Society of Queensland, special editions, and a range of assorted historical records. This digitisation effort aims to make this scientifically and historically valuable collection more accessible to scientists, historians and the public generally.

Qiaowanlong

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Royal Society of Tasmania

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Promoting Tasmanian historical, scientific and technological knowledge for the benefit of Tasmanians,

Fostering Tasmanian public engagement and participation in the quest for objective knowledge,

Recognising excellence in academia and supporting Tasmanian academic excellence, and

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Fellows of the Royal Society of Victoria are entitled to the use of the professional postnominal FRSV; subscribed members of the RSV are entitled to use of the professional postnominal MRSV.

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