Private (rank)

A private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to NATO Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in).

In modern military writing, "private" is shortened to "Pte" in the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth of Nations countries and to "Pvt." in the United States.

Etymology

The term derives from the medieval term "private soldiers" (a term still used in the British Army), denoting individuals who were either hired, conscripted, or mustered into service by a feudal nobleman commanding a battle group of an army. The usage of "private" dates from the 18th century.

Asia

Israel

For information, you may refer to Israel Defense Forces ranks.

In the Israel Defense Forces, טוראי Turai ("private") refers to the lowest enlisted rank. After 7–10 months of service (7 for combatants, 8 for combat support and 10 for non-combatants) soldiers are promoted from private to corporal (rav-turai or rabat), if they performed their duties appropriately during this time. Soldiers who take a commander's course, are prisoner instructors or practical engineers become corporals earlier. An IDF private wears no uniform insignia and is sometimes described as having a "slick sleeve" for this reason.

Israel Defense Forces ranks : נגדים חוגרים hogrim - enlisted
IDF NCO
Rank
טוראי
Turai
רב טוראי
Rav turai
סמל
Samal
סמל ראשון
Samal rishon
NATO  OR–2 OR–3 OR–4
Abbreviation טוראי
Turai
רב"ט
Rabat
סמל
Samal
סמ"ר
Samar
Corresponding
Rank
Private Corporal Sergeant Staff sergeant
Insignia IDF Ranks Private First Class IDF Ranks Rav turai IDF Ranks Samal IDF Ranks Samar
More details at Israel Defense Forces ranks & IDF 2012 - Ranks (idf.il, English)

Korea

The equivalent ranks to privates within the North and South Korean armies are il-byong (private first class) and e-byong (private second class). The symbol for this rank is 1 line ( | ) or 2 lines ( || ). Private second class is known by 1 line, while private first class is 2 lines.

Singapore

Once recruits complete their Basic Military Training (BMT) or Basic Rescue Training (BRT), they attain the rank of private (PTE). Privates (列兵) do not wear ranks on their rank holder. PTEs who performed well are promoted to the rank of Private First Class (PFC). The PFC rank insignia is a single chevron pointing downward.[1]

Indonesia

Pangdam Jaya pelantikan bintara 2015
Indonesian Army privates pose with two Generals

In Indonesia, this rank is referred to as Tamtama (specifically Prajurit), which is the lowest rank in the Indonesian Armed Forces and special Police Force. In the Indonesian Army, "Private" has three levels, which are: Private (Prajurit Dua), Private First Class (Prajurit Satu), and Master Private (Prajurit Kepala). After this rank, it is promoted the rank: Corporal.

Prada pdh ad

Private (Prajurit Dua)

Pratu pdh ad

Private First Class (Prajurit Satu)

Praka pdh ad

Master Private (Prajurit Kepala)

Commonwealth

Australia

In the Australian Army, a soldier of private rank wears no insignia.[2] Like its British Army counterpart, the Australian Army rank of private (PTE) has other titles, depending on the corps and specification of that service member.

The following alternative ranks are available for privates in the Australian Army:

Canada

In the Canadian Armed Forces, private is the lowest rank for members who wear army uniform. There are three levels of private: private (recruit), private (basic), and private (trained). All persons holding the rank of private are referred to as such and the qualifier shown in brackets is used on employment records only. The air force rank of aviator was formerly private, but this changed when traditional air force rank insignia were restored. The French-language equivalent of private is soldat.

  • Private (recruit) (Pte(R)) – an untrained new recruit holds this rank through recruit training, known as the Basic Military Qualification Course (BMQ).
  • Private (basic) (Pte(B)) – after BMQ, a soldier becomes a private (basic). This rank is held through occupational training (Qualification Level 3) until Qualfication Level 4 is attained. Private (recruit) and private (basic) are Development Period 1 within the Canadian Forces Professional Development System.
  • Private (trained) (Pte(T)) – A private (basic) becomes a private (trained) upon attaining Qualification Level 4. A private (trained) is the only private to wear rank insignia, a single chevron. Private (trained) and the next rank of corporal are Development Period 2 within the Canadian Forces Professional Development System.[3]

Canadian Army privates may be known by other titles, depending on their military trade and their unit’s tradition:

India and Pakistan

In the Indian Army and Pakistan Army the lowest enlisted rank is sepoy (/ˈsiːpɔɪ/), literally meaning "soldier" derived from Persian. A sepoy does not wear any rank insignia on his uniform.

South Africa

In the South African Army the lowest enlisted rank is Private. Privates don't wear insignia on their uniforms. In the different corps it is known with different titles.

United Kingdom

In the British Army, a private (Pte) equates to both OR-1 and OR-2 on the NATO scale, although there is no difference in rank. Privates wear no insignia. Many regiments and corps use other distinctive and descriptive names instead of private, some of these ranks have been used for centuries, others are less than 100 years old.[4] In the contemporary British Armed Forces, the army rank of private is broadly equivalent to able seaman in the Royal Navy, aircraftman, leading aircraftman and senior aircraftman in the Royal Air Force, and marine (Mne) or bandsman, as appropriate equivalent rank in the Royal Marines. In the Boys' Brigade the rank of private is used when a boy moves from the junior section to the company section.

Notably, both Sir Fitzroy Maclean and Enoch Powell are examples of rare, rapid career progression with the British Army, both rising from the rank of private to at least brigadier during World War II.

Distinctive equivalents for private include:

Royal Marines

In the Corps of Royal Marines the rank structure follows that of British infantry regiments, the only real exception being that the Royal Marines equivalent of private is Marine (Mne).

Europe and Latin America

Austria

The lowest rank in the Austrian Armed Forces is the Rekrut (literally Recruit). For recruits in training to become non-commissioned or commissioned officers the rank bears an additional silver crossbar.

Up until 1998 the rank was called Wehrmann. In 2017 the silver crossbar was removed, as the system of the 'officers career' changed.

Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Mexico and Spain

The equivalent rank to private in the Spanish, Mexican, Colombian, Dominican and Argentinian army is the soldado raso meaning "rankless soldier" or simply soldado.

Belgium

On enlistment in the Belgian army one is given the rank of soldaat (Dutch) or soldat (French), whether one wishes to be a volunteer, non-commissioned officer or officer. Subsequent rank depends on the branch of the service: for example, at the Royal Military Academy (for officer training) one is soon promoted to the rank of korporaal (Dutch) or caporal (French) i.e. "corporal". The insignia is a simple black mark or the simplified version of the Royal Military Academy's coat of arms for candidate officers.

Brazil and Portugal

Soldado is the rank equivalent to private in the Brazilian and Portuguese Armed Forces. Soldado means "soldier" in Portuguese.

Finland

Sotamies kauluslaatta
Military rank insignia of sotamies (private) of the Finnish Army and Air Force.

The Finnish equivalent rank is sotamies (literally "war man"), although since 1973 this has been purely a paper term as all infantry troopers were renamed as jääkäri troops, previously reserved only to mobile light infantry. As in the British army, the various branches use different names:

In the Finnish Air Force, the basic rank is lentosotamies ("flight war man"). In the Finnish Navy, the basic rank is matruusi ("seaman").

Special corps troopers may be referred by their function or unit, such as kaartinjääkäri (Guards jaeger), panssarijääkäri (panzerjäger), laskuvarjojääkäri (paratroop jaeger), rajajääkäri (border jaeger) or rannikkojääkäri (coastal jaeger).

France

In the French army soldat de seconde classe is the lowest military rank. This rank is also referred to as recrue ("recruit").

Germany

The German Bundeswehr modern-day equivalent of the private rank (NATO-standard code OR-2) is Gefreiter.

The equivalent of the lowest rank (NATO-standard code OR-1) is either Schütze (rifleman), Kanonier (gunner) or Jäger (light-infantryman otherwise ranger), and sometimes in general simply Soldat (soldier), as well as other unit-specific distinctions.[5] Up until 1918 it was Gemeine[6] (Ordinary [soldier]) as well as unit-specific distinctions such as Musketier (musketeer), Infanterist (infantryman), Kürassier (cuirassier), Jäger (light-infantryman otherwise ranger), Füsilier (fusilier) etc., until 1945 Soldat (soldier) and unit-specific distinctions such as Schütze (rifleman), Grenadier (grenadier) etc. The navy equivalent of the OR-1 rank is known as Matrose[5] (sailor or seaman), and the German Air Force equivalent is Flieger[5] (aviator or airman) which is also used by army aviators.

DH001-Soldat

Schütze, Kanonier, Jäger rank
shoulder epaulette
Army (Heer) uniform jacket

001-Soldat

Schütze, Kanonier, Jäger rank
Army (Heer) combat uniform

Luftwaffe-001-Flieger

Flieger rank
Air Force (Luftwaffe) combat uniform

002-Soldat-UA

Schütze, Kanonier, Jäger Unteroffizieranwärter (UA) NCO-candidate rank
Army (Heer) combat uniform

1 - matr

Matrose rank
Navy service uniform

Hungary

The name of the lowest rank in the Hungarian army (Magyar Honvédség) is the honvéd which means "homeland defender". The word is also used informally for a soldier in general of any rank (i.e. "our honvéds" or an officer referred as a honvédtiszt, honvéd officer). This is because Hungarian military traditions are strictly defensive, despite the Hungarian army participating in offensives on foreign soil in both world wars. The word honvéd has been in use since the Hungarian Revolution of 1848.

Ireland

IE-Army-OR2
2* private
IE-Army-OR3
3* private

Private (Pte) (saighdiúr singil in Irish), is the lowest enlisted rank in the Irish Army. Soldiers enlist as recruits then undergo a basic course of instruction. There are three grades of private in the army. After basic training the soldier is upgraded (rather than promoted) from recruit to private 2 star (Pte 2*) (saighdiúr singil, 2 réalta). After more corps-specific training (usually lasting eight weeks) the soldier is upgraded to private 3 star (Pte 3*) (saighdiúr singil, 3 réalta). All are usually just addressed as "private", although before being upgraded, recruits may be addressed as "recruit".

In corps units, the rank designation changes. In the artillery, the rank is known as gunner (Gnr), but usually only after the completion of a gunners' course, and in the cavalry it is known as trooper (Tpr). Communications and Information Services privates are known as signalman or signalwoman. Medical orderlies are sometimes referred to as medic, although this can apply to privates and corporals.

Italy

In the Italian Army soldato is the lowest military rank. This rank is also referred to as recluta (meaning recruit). Soldato is the generic term for private. But in many specialized corps this term is never used, as a more specific, corp related, term is preferred. For instance the lowest rank in Alpine troops is alpino, and the lowest rank in the artillery is artigliere. In the air force this is ranked as aviere and in the navy as marinaio.

Netherlands

In the Royal Netherlands Army, the Landmacht, the equivalent ranks are soldaat (soldier), similar to the original French, with different classes:

  • Soldaat der derde klasse (soldier/private 3rd class), for soldiers in Algemene Militaire Opleiding or AMO (General Military Training), with insignia.
  • Soldaat der tweede klasse (soldier/privat 2nd class), the basic infantry rank, an insignia single striped red band, obtained after AMO but before completion of Initiële Functie Opleiding or IFO (initial job training).
  • Soldaat der eerste klasse (soldier/privat 1st class), comparable to private first class, with an insignia with two neighbouring striped red bands, obtained automatically a year after completion of IFO.

Depending on where the soldaat serves, he may be deemed a kanonnier (gunner in the artillery), huzaar (hussar in the cavalry) or fuselier (rifleman in the rifles) as well as commando, jager or rijder. There is less differentiation than in other countries between different armed forces. A soldaat can be promoted to korporaal (corporal).

Sweden

In the Swedish Armed Forces a recruit is given the rank of ’’menig’’ in the army and ’’sjöman’’ in the navy.

After basic training which is roughly 3 months other terms can be used such as ’’soldat’’ (soldier), ’’jägare’’, etc.

Switzerland

In the Swiss Armed Forces a recruit is given the rank of Soldat when he finishes basic training, mostly after 13 weeks.

Turkey

In the Turkish Land Forces, Turkish Air Force and Turkish Naval Forces; Er (Private) is the lowest rank possible. This rank does not have any insignia.

United States

Army-USA-OR-02
U.S. Army Private E-2's insignia

United States Army

In the U.S. Army, private is used for the two lowest enlisted ranks, just below private first class (E-3) or PFC. The lowest rank is "Private (E-1)" or PV1, and sometimes referred to as recruit, but also held by some soldiers after punishment through the Uniform Code of Military Justice or prisoners after conviction until they are discharged. A PV1 wears no uniform rank insignia; since the advent of the Army Combat Uniform (ACU), the term "fuzzy" has come into vogue, referring to the blank velcro patch on the ACU where the rank would normally be placed. The second rank, "Private (E-2)" or PV2, wears a single chevron, known colloquially as "mosquito wings". Advancement to PV2 is automatic after six months' time in service, but may get shortened to four months if given a waiver. A person who earned the Eagle Scout award, the Gold Award, or completed at least two years of JROTC may enlist at any time at the rank of PV2.[7] The term of address, "Private," may be properly applied to any Army soldier E-1 (PV1) to E-3 (PFC). The abbreviation "PVT" may be used whenever the specific grade of private is immaterial (such as in Tables of Organization and Equipment). While a soldier is currently in Initial Enlistment Training, he or she will often be referred to as "Private" by the training cadre, regardless of actual rank, even if the soldier enlisted as a Specialist (E-4).

United States Marine Corps

In the U.S. Marine Corps, private (Pvt) refers only to the lowest enlisted rank, just below private first class. A Marine Corps private wears no uniform insignia and is sometimes described as having a "slick sleeve" for this reason. Most new, non-officer Marines begin their military career as a private. In the Marine Corps, privates first class are not referred to as "private"; it is more appropriate to use either "private first class" or "PFC".

See also

References

  1. ^ Singapore Air Force. "SAF Military Ranks - Enlistees". Archived from the original on 27 February 2015. Retrieved 26 February 2015.
  2. ^ "Australian Army Insignia". Users.chariot.net.au. Archived from the original on 1 January 2009. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  3. ^ "DAOD 5031-8, Canadian Forces Professional Development". Retrieved 2018-09-30.
  4. ^ "About The Royal Green Jackets – Did you know that?". Rgjmuseum.co.uk. Archived from the original on 2012-03-02. Retrieved 2012-10-02.
  5. ^ a b c "Official Website (Bundeswehr): Uniformen der Bundeswehr (Uniforms of the German Federal Defence Forces); shows service ranks of the Luftwaffe (page 15-17), Heer (page 09-13) and Navy (page 19-21), in German" (PDF). Bundeswehr.de. Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 January 2014. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  6. ^ "Duden : Gemeine : Rechtschreibung, Bedeutung, Definition". Duden.de (in German). Retrieved 2016-07-07.
  7. ^ "Army Regulation 601-210, Chapter 2–18" (PDF). Armypubs.army.mil. Archived from the original (PDF) on 17 June 2012. Retrieved 26 January 2014.

External links

61st Infantry Division (Russian Empire)

The 61st Infantry Division (Russian: 61-я пехотная дивизия, 61-ya Pekhotnaya Diviziya) was an infantry formation of the Russian Imperial Army.

8th Infantry Division (Russian Empire)

The 8th Infantry Division (Russian: 8-я пехотная дивизия, 8-ya Pekhotnaya Diviziya) was an infantry formation of the Russian Imperial Army that existed in various formations from the early 19th century until the end of World War I and the Russian Revolution. The division was based in Warsaw in the years leading up to 1914. It fought in World War I and was demobilized in 1918.

Airtrooper

The rank of airtrooper (abbreviated AirTpr) is a private rank, the first rank awarded to a soldier of the British Army Air Corps.

Charles Henry Morgan

Charles Henry Morgan (July 5, 1842 – January 4, 1912) was a United States Representative for Missouri, 1875–1879, 1883–1885, 1893–1895, and 1909–1911.

Constable

A constable is a person holding a particular office, most commonly in criminal law enforcement. The office of constable can vary significantly in different jurisdictions. A constable is commonly the rank of an officer within the police. Other people may be granted powers of a constable without holding this title.

Corporal

Corporal is a military rank in use in some form by many militaries and by some police forces or other uniformed organizations. Within NATO, each member nation's corresponding military rank of corporal is combined under the NATO-standard rank scale code OR-3 or OR-4. However, there are often differences in how each nation (or service in each nation) employs corporals. Some militaries don't have corporals, but may instead have a Junior Sergeant.

In some militaries, the rank of corporal nominally corresponds to commanding a section or squad of soldiers. However, in the United States Army, the rank of corporal is considered a "lateral promotion" from E-4 Specialist and usually only occurs when the soldier has been selected by a promotion board to become an E-5 Sergeant and is serving in an E-5 billet such as a fireteam leader in a rifle squad. The lateral promotion is used to make the soldier a non-commissioned officer without changing the soldier's pay. As the Table of Organization & Equipment (TO&E) rank of a fire team leader is sergeant and that of squad leader is staff sergeant. In the United States Marine Corps, corporal is the Table of Organization (TO) rank for a rifle fire team leader, machine gun team leader, light mortar squad leader, and assault weapon squad leader, as well as gunner on most larger crew served weapons (i.e. medium mortars, heavy machine guns, and anti-tank missiles), armored vehicles (e.g. tanks, light armored vehicles, and armored assault vehicles), and the two assistant gunners on a howitzer (the gunner is a sergeant).

In most countries that derive their military structure from the British military system, corporal is a more senior rank than that of private. However, in several other countries, such as Canada, Italy and Norway, corporal is a junior rank, indicating a more experienced soldier than a private, and also on a higher pay scale, but having no particular command appointment corresponding to the rank, similar to specialist in the U.S. Army.

Infanterist

Infanterist (en: infantryman) – was the designation to the lowest private rank of infantry, the biggest armed forces branch of the common Austro-Hungarian Army (k.u.k. Army) from 1867 to 1918.

However, until 1918 Infanterist was also the common or generic designation to soldiers, rank independent, of the Infantry branch in the Austro-Hungarian Army as well as in the Army of the German Empire.

In line to the appropriate branch of service it did belong to the so-called Gemeine rank group, comparable to private, soldier or G.I. in Anglophone armed forces. Other Gemeine ranks were as follows:

Dragoner (en: dragoon),

Füsilier (fusilier | Am. also fusileer),

Grenadier,

Husar (hussar),

Infanterist (infantryman)

Kanonier (gunner, cannoneer),

Musketier (musketeer), etc.

Pionier (engineer)

Sanitätssoldat (medicalman)

Trainsoldat (trainman)

Ulan (uhlan)Waffenrock k.u.k Infantrists until 1918

Jäger (infantry)

Jäger (singular [der] Jäger, plural [die] Jäger, German pronunciation: [ˈjɛːɡɐ]) is a German military term that originally referred to light infantry, but has come to have wider usage.

While it may be literally translated as "hunter", in German-speaking states during the early modern era, the term Jäger was used to describe skirmishers, scouts, sharpshooters and runners. Jäger came to denote light infantrymen whose civilian occupations made them well-suited to patrolling and skirmishing, on an individual and independent basis, rather than as part of military unit.

While Jäger often continued to carry its original connotations, the word's usage and derivatives broadened over time. For instance, Feldjäger was the name given by the Prussian Army to scouts and runners. During the 20th century, Jäger became the German word for fighter aircraft, while Panzerjäger was the name adopted for tank destroyers. Conversely, in the modern German army (Bundeswehr), Feldjäger is the name given to military police.

Jäger, in its original sense of light infantry, is usually translated into English as:

"rifleman" (in an infantry role) or "Rifles" (in regimental names) and;

"ranger" (especially in North American English; see below).In English Jäger is often written as jaeger (both pl. and sgl.) or anglicised as jager (pl. jagers) to avoid the umlaut.

No Time for Sergeants (1958 film)

No Time for Sergeants is a 1958 American comedy film directed by Mervyn LeRoy starring Andy Griffith and featuring Myron McCormick, Don Knotts and most of the original Broadway cast. Warner Bros. contract player Nick Adams joined the cast as Stockdale's fellow military draftee Benjamin B. Whitledge, as did Murray Hamilton as Irving S. Blanchard. The film is based on a play inspired by the original novel.

Ranks of the Austrian Bundesheer

The Austrian Bundesheer of the Second Republic has 21 military ranks. Gorget patches generally show corps colors (Waffenfarbe), as is presented below.

Rekrut

Rekrut (en: recruit) is the designation of a military appointment, position or status in German-speaking countries that characterizes newly recruited or sought personnel during the initial period of the basic military training. However, in some countries, e.g. Austria and Switzerland, Rekrut might be the lowest rank of enlisted men, comparable to NATO OR-1.

Royal Ranger Regiment

The Royal Ranger Regiment (Malay: 'Rejimen Renjer DiRaja'; RRD) is an infantry regiment of the Malaysian Army. Although it is second in seniority to the Royal Malay Regiment (Rejimen Askar Melayu DiRaja; RAMD), the RRD can trace its origins back to the mid 19th century and the establishment of The Sarawak Rangers, the peacekeeping force in the Sarawak region. This force was absorbed by the Sarawak Constabulary in 1932, but the name was revived in 1941 as a British Colonial unit; this unit commanded by British Lieutenant Colonel C.M. Lane was captured by the Japanese in 1942.

Schütze

Schütze in German means "rifleman" or "shooter", or in older terms originally connoted "archer" before the advent of the rifle. It also occasionally occurs as a surname, or as Schütz, as in the opera Der Freischütz. The word itself is derived from the German word schützen, meaning to protect, or to guard. It was originally used for archers as they protected castle walls, and is the German equivalent to Sagittarius, the mythical form which held bow and arrow.

Sergeant

Sergeant (abbreviated to Sgt and capitalized when used as a named person's title) is a rank in many uniformed organizations, principally military and policing forces. The alternate spelling, "serjeant", is used in The Rifles and other units that draw their heritage from the British Light Infantry. Its origin is the Latin "serviens", "one who serves", through the French term "sergent".

The term "sergeant" refers to a non-commissioned officer placed above the rank of a corporal and a police officer immediately below a lieutenant or, in the UK, below an inspector.

In most armies the rank of sergeant corresponds to command of a squad (or section). In Commonwealth armies, it is a more senior rank, corresponding roughly to a platoon second-in-command. In the United States Army, sergeant is a more junior rank corresponding to a four-soldier fireteam leader.

More senior non-commissioned ranks are often variations on sergeant, for example staff sergeant, first sergeant and sergeant major.

Many countries use sergeant rank, whether in English or using a cognate with the same origin in another language. The equivalent rank in Arab armies is "raqeeb", meaning "overseer" or "watcher".

Troop

A troop is a military sub-subunit, originally a small formation of cavalry, subordinate to a squadron. In many armies a troop is the equivalent element to the infantry section or platoon. Exceptions are the Royal Horse Artillery and the US Cavalry, where a troop is a subunit comparable to an infantry company or artillery battery.

A cavalry soldier of private rank is called a trooper in many Commonwealth armies (abbreviated "Tpr", not to be confused with "trouper").

A related sense of the term "troops" refers to members of the military collectively, as in "the troops"; see Troop (disambiguation).

In some countries, like Italy, the company-level cavalry unit is called "Squadron".

Navies Armies Air forces
Commissioned officers
Admiral of
the fleet
Field marshal or
General of the Army
Marshal of
the air force
Admiral General Air chief marshal
Vice admiral Lieutenant general Air marshal
Rear admiral Major general Air vice-marshal
Commodore Brigadier or
brigadier general
Air commodore
Captain Colonel Group captain
Commander Lieutenant colonel Wing commander
Lieutenant
commander
Major or
Commandant
Squadron leader
Lieutenant Captain Flight lieutenant
Lieutenant
junior grade
or
sub-lieutenant
Lieutenant or
first lieutenant
Flying officer
Ensign or
midshipman
Second lieutenant Pilot officer
Officer cadet Officer cadet Flight cadet
Enlisted grades
Warrant officer or
chief petty officer
Warrant officer or
sergeant major
Warrant officer
Petty officer Sergeant Sergeant
Leading seaman Corporal or
bombardier
Corporal
Seaman Private or
gunner or
trooper
Aircraftman or
airman
Talk·View
United States enlisted ranks
Pay grade
Branch of service
E-1 E-2 E-3 E-4 E-5 E-6 E-7 E-8 E-9
Private
PVT
Private 2
PV2
Private First Class
PFC
Specialist Corporal
SPCCPL
Sergeant
SGT
Staff Sergeant
SSG
Sergeant First Class
SFC
Master Sergeant First Sergeant
MSG1SG
Sergeant Major Command Sergeant Major Sergeant Major of the Army
SGMCSMSMA
Private
Pvt
Private First Class
PFC
Lance Corporal
LCpl
Corporal
Cpl
Sergeant
Sgt
Staff Sergeant
SSgt
Gunnery Sergeant
GySgt
Master Sergeant First sergeant
MSgt1stSgt
Master Gunnery Sergeant Sergeant Major Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps
MGySgtSgtMajSMMC
Seaman recruit
SR
Seaman apprentice
SA
Seaman
SN
Petty Officer Third Class
PO3
Petty Officer Second Class
PO2
Petty Officer First Class
PO1
Chief Petty Officer
CPO
Senior Chief Petty Officer Command Senior Chief Petty Officer
SCPOCMDCS
Master Chief Petty Officer Command Master Chief Petty Officer Fleet Master Chief Petty Officer / Force Master Chief Petty Officer Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy
MCPOCMDCMFORCM, FLTCMMCPON
Airman basic
AB
Airman
Amn
Airman First Class
A1C
Senior Airman
SrA
Staff Sergeant
SSgt
Technical sergeant
TSgt
Master Sergeant Master Sergeant
MSgt1st Sgt
Senior Master Sergeant Senior Master Sergeant
SMSgt1st Sgt
Chief Master Sergeant Chief Master Sergeant Command Chief Master Sergeant Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force
CMSgt1st SgtCCMCMSAF
Seaman Recruit
SR
Seaman Apprentice
SA
Seaman
SN
Petty Officer Third Class
PO3
Petty Officer Second Class
PO2
Petty Officer First Class
PO1
Chief Petty Officer
CPO
Senior Chief Petty Officer
SCPO
Master Chief Petty Officer Command Master Chief Petty Officer Area Command Master Chief Petty Officer, CMC Reserve Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard
MCPOCMC – Area CMC, CGRF-CMC – MCPOCG

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