Prison film

A prison film is a film genre concerned with prison life and often prison escape. These films range from acclaimed dramas examining the nature of prisons, such as Cool Hand Luke, Midnight Express, Brubaker, Escape from Alcatraz, The Shawshank Redemption, and Kiss of the Spider Woman to actioners like Lock Up and Undisputed, and even comedies satirizing the genre like Stir Crazy, Life, and Let's Go to Prison. Prison films have been asserted to be "guilty of oversimplifying complex issues, the end result of which is the proliferation of stereotypes".[1] For example, they are said to perpetuate "a common misperception that most correctional officers are abusive", and that prisoners are "violent and beyond redemption".[1]

Themes repeatedly visited in the action films include escape attempts, gang activities inside the prison, efforts of wrongly convicted persons to prove their innocence, and guard and management cruelty. An entire subgenre of films exists where the toughest prisoners are permitted (or forced) to engage in boxing matches or martial arts bouts, replete with high-stakes wagering on the outcomes. Another subgenre exists of sexploitation films featuring women in prison engaging in sexual activities. These various theme elements may be meshed together, where for example a prisoner forced to fight uses the occasion to plan an escape.

POW films

Prison films set during war have become a popular subgenre known as prisoner of war film.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Cecil, Dawn K. (Mar 2017). "Prisons in Popular Culture". Oxford Research Encyclopedias. doi:10.1093/acrefore/9780190264079.013.194.
99 Women

99 Women (German: Der heiße Tod, lit. "The Hot Death") is a 1969 women in prison film. One of the earliest and most financially successful examples of the genre, it was directed by Jesús Franco, produced by Harry Alan Towers as an international co-production, and features an international cast including Maria Schell, Mercedes McCambridge, Maria Rohm, Rosalba Neri, Luciana Paluzzi and Herbert Lom.

The script was purchased from Robert L. Lippert.

Abashiri Prison (film)

Abashiri Prison (網走番外地, Abashiri Bangaichi) aka A Man from Abashiri Prison is a 1965 Japanese film directed by Teruo Ishii and starring Ken Takakura. It is the first entry in the Abashiri Bangaichi / Abashiri Prison series. Highly successful, it was the first hit in the yakuza film genre. It made a star of Takakura and Ishii directed ten more films in the series.

Bob Gunton

Robert Patrick Gunton Jr. (born November 15, 1945) is an American actor. Gunton is known for playing strict, authoritarian characters, including Warden Samuel Norton in the 1994 prison film The Shawshank Redemption, Chief George Earle in 1993's Demolition Man, Dr. Walcott, the domineering dean of Virginia Medical School in Patch Adams, and President Juan Peron in the original Broadway production of Evita, for which he received a Tony Award nomination. He also appears in the Daredevil TV series as Leland Owlsley.

Caged Heat

Caged Heat, also known as Renegade Girls, is a 1974 women in prison film. It was written and directed by Jonathan Demme for New World Pictures, headed by Roger Corman. The film stars Juanita Brown, Roberta Collins, Erica Gavin, Ella Reid, Rainbeaux Smith, and Barbara Steele.

John Cale wrote and performed its soundtrack music, which features the guitar playing of Mike Bloomfield.

Two later features, Caged Heat II: Stripped of Freedom (1994) and Caged Heat 3000 (1995), made use of the Caged Heat name and the women-in-prison situation, but are unrelated films.

Diana Penty

Diana Penty (pronounced [ɖaːjnaː peːnʈiː] is an Indian model and actress who appears in Hindi films. She began her modelling career in 2005 when she was signed up by Elite Models India. Penty made her acting debut in 2012 with the romantic comedy film Cocktail. Her performance in the film garnered praise, and earned her a nomination for Filmfare Award for Best Female Debut.Post Cocktail, Penty played a free-spirited runaway bride in the comedy film Happy Bhag Jayegi; she garnered praise for her performance and the film went on to become a hit grossing over ₹391 million. She went on to feature in the prison film Lucknow Central (2017) and the action film Parmanu: The Story of Pokhran (2018).

Penty is also an active celebrity endorser for such brands as TRESemmé and Nokia.

Felon (film)

Felon is a 2008 American prison film written and directed by Ric Roman Waugh. The film stars Stephen Dorff, Val Kilmer and Harold Perrineau. The film tells the story of the family man who ends up in state prison after he kills an intruder. The story is based on events that took place in the 1990s at the notorious California State Prison, Corcoran. The film was released in the United States on July 18, 2008.

Girls in Prison

Girls in Prison is a 1956 drama/sexploitation women in prison film about a young woman who is convicted of being an accomplice to a bank robbery and is sent to an all-female prison. The film was directed by Edward L. Cahn, and stars Richard Denning, Joan Taylor, and Mae Marsh. American International Pictures released the film as a double feature with Hot Rod Girl.

King of the Damned

King of the Damned is a 1935 British prison film directed by Walter Forde and starring Conrad Veidt, Helen Vinson, Noah Beery and Cecil Ramage.

Papillon (1973 film)

Papillon is a 1973 historical period drama prison film directed by Franklin J. Schaffner. The screenplay by Dalton Trumbo and Lorenzo Semple Jr. was based on the 1969 autobiography by the French convict Henri Charrière. The film stars Steve McQueen as Henri Charrière ("Papillon") and Dustin Hoffman as Louis Dega. Because it was filmed at remote locations, the film was quite expensive for the time ($12 million), but it earned more than twice that in its first year of release. The film's title is French for "Butterfly," referring to Charrière's tattoo and nickname.

Prison (1949 film)

Prison (Swedish: Fängelse), also known as The Devil's Wanton in the United States, is a 1949 Swedish drama film directed by Ingmar Bergman. It is the earliest film directed by Bergman to be based on his own original screenplay.

Prison Song

Prison Song is a 2001 American film directed by Darnell Martin. A prison film, its plot concerns a boy brought up in group homes who has a gift and passion for art. It also marked the film debut of future Oscar-nominated Mary J. Blige as an actress.

Sadomania

Sadomania – Hölle der Lust is a 1981 German-Spanish women in prison film directed by Jesús Franco, starring Ajita Wilson. It was also released as Hellhole Women, Prisoners of the Flesh and Sadomania: The Hell of Passion.

So Evil, So Young

So Evil, So Young is a 1961 British Technicolor reform school prison film produced by the Danzigers, directed by Godfrey Grayson, and starring Jill Ireland and Ellen Pollock.

The Concrete Jungle (film)

The Concrete Jungle is a 1982 American women in prison film directed by Tom DeSimone and featuring Jill St. John and Tracey E. Bregman.

The Muthers

The Muthers is a 1976 women in prison film. It starred Jeannie Bell, Rosanne Katon, Trina Parks, Jayne Kennedy, Tony Carreon and John Montgomery.

Unchained (film)

Unchained is a 1955 prison film directed by Hall Bartlett and starring Elroy Hirsch, Barbara Hale, Chester Morris, Todd Duncan, and Johnny Johnston. Based on the non-fiction book Prisoners are People by Kenyon J. Scudder, it is most remembered for its theme song, "Unchained Melody".

Women in Cell Block 7

Diario segreto da un carcere femminile (International title: Women in Cell Block 7, UK title: Love in a Woman's Prison) is a 1973 Italian women in prison film written and directed by Rino Di Silvestro. It represents the directorial debut of Di Silvestro and the first Italian women in prison film.

Women in prison film

The women in prison film (or WiP film) is a subgenre of exploitation film that began in the early 1900s and continues to the present day.

Their stories feature imprisoned women who are subjected to sexual and physical abuse, typically by sadistic male or female prison wardens, guards and other inmates. The genre also features many films in which imprisoned women engage in lesbian sex.

WiP films are works of fiction intended as pornography. The films of this genre include a mixture of erotic adventures of the women in prison. The flexible format, and the loosening of film censorship laws in the 1960s, allowed filmmakers to depict more extreme fetishes, such as voyeurism (strip searches, group shower scenes, catfights), sexual fantasies (lesbianism, rape, sexual slavery), fetishism (bondage, whipping, degradation), and sadism (beatings, torture, cruelty).

Prior to these films, another expression of pornographic women in prison was found in "true adventure" men's magazines such as Argosy in the 1950s and 1960s, although it is possible that Denis Diderot's novel The Nun anticipated the genre. Nazis tormenting damsels in distress were particularly common in these magazines.

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