Principal Galaxies Catalogue

The Catalogue of Principal Galaxies (PGC) is an astronomical catalog published in 1989 that lists B1950 and J2000 equatorial coordinates and cross-identifications for 73,197 galaxies. It is based on the Lyon-Meudon Extragalactic Database (LEDA), which was originally started in 1983.[2] 40,932 coordinates (56%) have standard deviations smaller than 10″. A total of 131,601 names from the 38 most common sources are listed. Available mean data for each object are given:[3]

The Lyon-Meudon Extragalactic Database was eventually expanded into HyperLEDA, a database of a few million galaxies. Galaxies in the original PGC catalogue are numbered with their original PGC number in HyperLEDA. Numbers have also been assigned for the other galaxies, although for those galaxies not in the original PGC catalogue, it is not recommended to use that number as a name.[2]

Principal Galaxies Catalogue
PGC 39058
The obscured dwarf galaxy PGC 39058

Examples

PGC 6240

PGC 6240 (also known as White Rose Galaxy) is a large lenticular galaxy in the constellation Hydrus. It is located about 106 million parsecs away from Earth.

PGC 39058

PGC 39058 is a dwarf galaxy which is located approximately 14 million light years away in the constellation of Draco. It is relatively nearby, however it is obscured by a bright star which is in front of the galaxy.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Soft shells and strange star clusters". ESA/Hubble Press Release. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  2. ^ a b "HYPERLEDA Help: Internal number: pgc". HyperLeda. Retrieved 19 January 2017.
  3. ^ Paturel, G.; Fouque, P.; Bottinelli, L.; Gouguenheim, L. (November 1989). "An extragalactic database. I - The Catalogue of Principal Galaxies". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series. 80 (3): 299–315. Bibcode:1989A&AS...80..299P. ISSN 0365-0138.

External links

NGC 112

NGC 112 is a spiral galaxy located in the constellation Andromeda.

It was discovered by American astronomer, Lewis Swift, on September 17, 1885. The galaxy lies approximately 295 Million light-years from earth, and is about 75,000 light-years in diameter.

NGC 113

NGC 113 is a lenticular galaxy located in the constellation Cetus.

It was discovered by German astronomer, Ernst Wilhelm Leberecht Tempel, on August 27, 1876. The galaxy lies approximately 210 Million light-years from earth, and is about 80,000 light-years in diameter.

NGC 132

NGC 132 is a spiral galaxy in the constellation Cetus. It was discovered by William Herschel.

NGC 139

NGC 139 is a barred spiral galaxy in the constellation Pisces. It was discovered on August 29, 1864 by the German astronomer Albert Marth.

NGC 143

NGC 143 is a spiral galaxy in the constellation Cetus. It was discovered by Frank Muller in 1886.

NGC 149

NGC 149 is a lenticular galaxy in the Andromeda constellation. It was discovered by Édouard Stephan on October 4, 1883.

NGC 160

NGC 160 is a spiral galaxy in the Andromeda constellation. It was discovered on December 5, 1785, by William Herschel.

NGC 177

NGC 177 is an unbarred spiral galaxy with a distinct ring structure, located around 200 million light-years away in the constellation Cetus. It was discovered in 1886 by Frank Muller.

NGC 21

NGC 21 (also known as NGC 29) is a spiral galaxy in the Andromeda constellation. It was discovered by William Herschel in 1790. Lewis Swift observed it again in 1885, leading to its double listing in the New General Catalogue

NGC 255

NGC 255 is a barred spiral galaxy in the constellation Cetus. It was discovered on November 27, 1785, by Frederick William Herschel.

NGC 39

NGC 39 (also known as UGC 114, MCG 5-1-52, ZWG 499.76 or PGC 852) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation Andromeda. It was discovered in 1790.

NGC 451

NGC 451 is a spiral galaxy located in the constellation Pisces. It was discovered in 1881 by Édouard Stephan.

NGC 452

NGC 452 is a spiral galaxy located in the constellation Pisces. It was discovered in 1827 by Sir John Herschel. It is about 5 arcminutes west of NGC 444.

NGC 62

NGC 62 is a spiral galaxy in the constellation Cetus. It is located at RA 00h 17m 05.4s, dec −13° 29′ 15″, and has an apparent magnitude of 13.5.

NGC 69

NGC 69 is a lenticular galaxy located in the constellation Andromeda. It is a member of the NGC 68 group. It was discovered in 1855 by R. J. Mitchell, who described it as "extremely faint, very small, round."

NGC 73

NGC 73 is a spiral galaxy estimated to be about 350 million light-years away in the constellation of Cetus. It was discovered by Lewis A. Swift from the USA in 1886 and its magnitude is 13.7.

NGC 74

NGC 74 is a lenticular galaxy located in the Andromeda constellation. It was discovered on 7 October 1855 by Irish astronomer William Parsons.

NGC 76

NGC 76 is a lenticular galaxy estimated to be about 325 million light-years away in the constellation of Andromeda. It was discovered by Guillaume Bigourdan from France in 1884 and its magnitude is 13.1.

NGC 81

NGC 81 is a lenticular galaxy estimated to be about 270 million light-years away in the constellation of Andromeda.

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