Prince of Wales Trophy

The Prince of Wales Trophy,[1] also known as the Wales Trophy, is an award presented by the National Hockey League (NHL) to the Eastern Conference (formerly the Wales Conference) playoff champions, prior to the final series of games for the Stanley Cup. Named for Prince Edward, Prince of Wales (later King Edward VIII and then Duke of Windsor), the trophy was first presented in the 1925–26 NHL season to the champion of the first game in Madison Square Garden and then subsequently presented to the champion of the NHL playoffs (including the previous two seasons). However, the trophy has been awarded for eight different accomplishments throughout its history, including for the American Division regular season champions, the NHL regular season champions, the East Division season champions, the Wales Conference regular season champions, the Wales Conference playoff champions, and the Eastern Conference playoff champions. The current holder of the Prince of Wales Trophy are the Washington Capitals, after winning the 2018 Eastern Conference Final.

Prince of Wales Trophy
Hhof prince of wales
SportIce hockey
Given forEastern Conference playoff champions of the National Hockey League
History
First award1925–26 NHL season
Most recentWashington Capitals

History

Prince-of-wales-trophy-announcement
New York Times announcement

The Prince of Wales Trophy was first announced in December 1925. It was sponsored by the then Prince of Wales, Prince Edward, and thus bore the Prince of Wales' feathers and the shield of the Royal Coat of Arms of Canada. Costing $2,500, the trophy was said to be in the possession of the league champion.[2] It was originally awarded to the winner of the first game played in Madison Square Garden, held on December 15, 1925 (Montreal Canadiens 3 at New York Americans 1). The award was then held by the Canadiens until the end of the season.[3][4] The Canadiens engraved their name on the trophy twice, for the 1924–25 season, and the preceding 1923–24 season, for which the team was league champions.

It was then awarded to the NHL playoff champion in 1925–26 and 1926–27, (along with the O'Brien Cup) before that team would go on to face the Western Hockey League (WHL) champion for the Stanley Cup at the end of those seasons.[5] From 1927-28 season on, the trophy was awarded to the champion of the American Division of the NHL, while the O'Brien Cup was presented to the Canadian Division champion, until 1938, when, after the NHL reverted to a single division, the Wales Trophy was made the award for the overall regular season champion.[5]

With the expansion of the NHL in 1967, and the creation of the West Division, the Wales Trophy was given to the team that finished in first place in the East Division, during the regular season. When the league formed two conferences in 1974, the trophy transferred to the team that finished with the best regular season record in the Wales Conference, until 1981. The NHL changed its playoff format so that the two conference playoff champions would meet for the Stanley Cup. The Prince of Wales Trophy was presented to the Wales Conference playoff champions. In the summer of 1993 Wales Conference was renamed the Eastern Conference. Prince of Wales trophy has been awarded to the Eastern Conference playoff champions since the 1993-94 season.[5]

A superstition that is prevalent among many of today's NHL players is that no player should either touch or hoist the Wales (Eastern Conference champion) or Clarence S. Campbell (Western Conference champion) Trophies after they have won the conference playoffs; these players feel that the Stanley Cup is the true championship trophy and thus it should be the only trophy that they should be hoisting. Instead of touching the conference trophy, the captain of the winning team merely poses (usually looking solemn) with the trophy, and sometimes, the entire team poses as well. However, there have been other teams who have ignored the superstition and hoisted the conference trophies, sometimes going on to win the Cup anyway.[6][7]

Winners

Total awards won
Wins Team
25 Montreal Canadiens
17 Boston Bruins
13 Detroit Red Wings
6 Pittsburgh Penguins
5 New Jersey Devils
4 New York Rangers
Philadelphia Flyers
3 Buffalo Sabres
New York Islanders
2 Carolina Hurricanes
Chicago Blackhawks
Tampa Bay Lightning
Toronto Maple Leafs
Washington Capitals
1 Florida Panthers
Montreal Maroons
Ottawa Senators
Ottawa Senators (original)[nb 1]
Key
  • * Defunct team
  • ^ = Year clinched to lead years won
  • ¤ = Year clinched to lead years consecutively won
  • † = Eventual Stanley Cup champions
  • a = Engraved in 1925–26.[3]

Original winner

1923–1925 (pre-donation) engravings

The Canadiens were league champions for these seasons.

Season Winner Win #
1923–24 Montreal Canadiensa 1
1924–25 Montreal Canadiens 2

NHL playoff champions (1925–1927)

Season Winner Win #
1925–26 Montreal Maroons * † 1
1926–27 Ottawa Senators (original)[nb 1] *† 1

American Division regular season champions (1927–1938)

Season Winner Win #
1927–28 Boston Bruins 1
1928–29 Boston Bruins 2
1929–30 Boston Bruins 3
1930–31 Boston Bruins 4
1931–32 New York Rangers 1
1932–33 Boston Bruins 5
1933–34 Detroit Red Wings 1
1934–35 Boston Bruins 6
1935–36 Detroit Red Wings 2
1936–37 Detroit Red Wings 3
1937–38 Boston Bruins 7

Regular season champions (1938–1967)

Season Winner Win #
1938–39 Boston Bruins 8
1939–40 Boston Bruins 9
1940–41 Boston Bruins 10
1941–42 New York Rangers 2
1942–43 Detroit Red Wings 4
1943–44 Montreal Canadiens 3
1944–45 Montreal Canadiens 4
1945–46 Montreal Canadiens 5
1946–47 Montreal Canadiens 6
1947–48 Toronto Maple Leafs 1
1948–49 Detroit Red Wings 5
1949–50 Detroit Red Wings 6
1950–51 Detroit Red Wings 7
1951–52 Detroit Red Wings 8
1952–53 Detroit Red Wings 9
1953–54 Detroit Red Wings ¤ † 10
1954–55 Detroit Red Wings 11
1955–56 Montreal Canadiens 7
1956–57 Detroit Red Wings 12
1957–58 Montreal Canadiens 8
1958–59 Montreal Canadiens 9
1959–60 Montreal Canadiens 10
1960–61 Montreal Canadiens 11
1961–62 Montreal Canadiens 12
1962–63 Toronto Maple Leafs 2
1963–64 Montreal Canadiens 13
1964–65 Detroit Red Wings 13
1965–66 Montreal Canadiens 14
1966–67 Chicago Black Hawks 1

East Division regular season champions (1967–1974)

Season Winner Win #
1967–68 Montreal Canadiens 15
1968–69 Montreal Canadiens 16
1969–70 Chicago Black Hawks 2
1970–71 Boston Bruins 11
1971–72 Boston Bruins 12
1972–73 Montreal Canadiens ^ † 17
1973–74 Boston Bruins 13

Wales Conference regular season champions (1974–1981)

Season Winner Win #
1974–75 Buffalo Sabres 1
1975–76 Montreal Canadiens 18
1976–77 Montreal Canadiens 19
1977–78 Montreal Canadiens 20
1978–79 Montreal Canadiens 21
1979–80 Buffalo Sabres 2
1980–81 Montreal Canadiens 22

Wales Conference playoffs champions (1981–1993)

Season Winner Win #
1981–82 New York Islanders 1
1982–83 New York Islanders 2
1983–84 New York Islanders 3
1984–85 Philadelphia Flyers 1
1985–86 Montreal Canadiens 23
1986–87 Philadelphia Flyers 2
1987–88 Boston Bruins 14
1988–89 Montreal Canadiens 24
1989–90 Boston Bruins 15
1990–91 Pittsburgh Penguins 1
1991–92 Pittsburgh Penguins 2
1992–93 Montreal Canadiens 25

Eastern Conference playoffs champions (1993–present)

Sidney Crosby 1 2017-05-25 (Edited)
Sidney Crosby of the 2017 Eastern Conference champion Pittsburgh Penguins poses with the Prince of Wales Trophy
Season Winner Win #
1993–94 New York Rangers 3
1994–95 New Jersey Devils 1
1995–96 Florida Panthers 1
1996–97 Philadelphia Flyers 3
1997–98 Washington Capitals 1
1998–99 Buffalo Sabres 3
1999–2000 New Jersey Devils 2
2000–01 New Jersey Devils 3
2001–02 Carolina Hurricanes 1
2002–03 New Jersey Devils 4
2003–04 Tampa Bay Lightning 1
2004–05 No winner because of the 2004–05 NHL lockout Season canceled
2005–06 Carolina Hurricanes 2
2006–07 Ottawa Senators 1
2007–08 Pittsburgh Penguins 3
2008–09 Pittsburgh Penguins 4
2009–10 Philadelphia Flyers 4
2010–11 Boston Bruins 16
2011–12 New Jersey Devils 5
2012–13 Boston Bruins 17
2013–14 New York Rangers 4
2014–15 Tampa Bay Lightning 2
2015–16 Pittsburgh Penguins 5
2016–17 Pittsburgh Penguins 6
2017–18 Washington Capitals 2
Notes
  1. ^ a b Refers to the original Ottawa Senators NHL franchise (1917–1934)

See also

References

  1. ^ NHL.com. "Prince of Wales Trophy".
  2. ^ "Prince of Wales Sponsors New Cup: Trophy Costing $2,500 Will Be Emblematic of National Hockey League Title". New York Times. December 7, 1925. p. 26.
  3. ^ a b McCarthy, Dave, ed. (2008). The National Hockey League Official Guide & Record Book 2009. Dan Diamond & Associates, Inc. p. 241.
  4. ^ "New York Beaten by Canadiens 3–1". The Globe. December 16, 1925. p. 10.
  5. ^ a b c Legends of Hockey.net. "History of the Prince of Wales Trophy". Archived from the original on 2007-09-29.
  6. ^ Kaplan, Emily (2011-05-28). "Conference trophies: to touch, or not to touch?". NHL.com. Retrieved 2011-11-12.
  7. ^ Coffey, Phil (2006-06-02). "NHL.com - Ice Age: Having another trophy in mind". Retrieved 2006-07-25.

External links

1924–25 Montreal Canadiens season

The 1924–25 Montreal Canadiens season was the team's 16th season and eighth as a member of the National Hockey League (NHL). The Canadiens once again made it to the Stanley Cup Final but lost to the Victoria Cougars.

1925–26 NHL season

The 1925–26 NHL season was the ninth season of the National Hockey League (NHL). The NHL dropped the Hamilton, Ontario team and added two new teams in the United States (US), the New York Americans and the Pittsburgh Pirates to bring the total number of teams to seven. The Ottawa Senators were the regular-season champion, but lost in the NHL playoff final to the Montreal Maroons. The Maroons then defeated the defending Stanley Cup champion Victoria Cougars of the newly renamed Western Hockey League three games to one in a best-of-five series to win their first Stanley Cup.

1979–80 Buffalo Sabres season

The 1979–80 Buffalo Sabres season was the Sabres' tenth season of operation for the National Hockey League franchise that was established on May 22, 1970. The team was awarded the Prince of Wales Trophy for finishing with the best regular season record in the Prince of Wales Conference.

Clarence S. Campbell Bowl

The Clarence S. Campbell Bowl, or simply the Campbell Bowl, is a National Hockey League trophy awarded to the Western Conference playoff champions. It is named after Clarence S. Campbell, who served as President of the NHL from 1946–47 to 1976–77. The trophy itself is constructed of sterling silver, crafted in 1878. The Vegas Golden Knights are the current holders of the trophy after winning the 2018 Western Conference Final.

Eastern Conference (NHL)

The Eastern Conference (French: Conférence de l'Est) is one of two conferences in the National Hockey League (NHL) used to divide teams. Its counterpart is the Western Conference.

Previously known as the Prince of Wales Conference (or Wales Conference for short), it was created in 1974 when the NHL realigned its teams into two conferences and four divisions. Because the new conferences and divisions had little to do with North American geography, geographical references were removed.

List of Carolina Hurricanes head coaches

The Carolina Hurricanes are an American professional ice hockey team based in Raleigh, North Carolina. They play in the Metropolitan Division of the Eastern Conference in the National Hockey League (NHL). The team joined the NHL in 1979 as an expansion team as the Hartford Whalers, but moved to Raleigh, North Carolina in 1997. The Hurricanes won their first Stanley Cup championship in 2006. Having first played at the Greensboro Coliseum, the Hurricanes have played their home games at the PNC Arena, which was first named the Raleigh Entertainment & Sports Arena, since 1999. The Hurricanes are owned by Tom Dundon and Don Waddell is their general manager.There have been four head coaches for the Hurricanes team. The team's first head coach was Paul Maurice, who has coached for six seasons. Maurice is the team's all-time leader for the most regular-season games coached, regular-season game wins, regular-season points, playoff games coached and playoff-game wins. Peter Laviolette is the only coach to have won the Stanley Cup with the Hurricanes in the 2006 Stanley Cup Finals. None of the Hurricanes coaches have been elected into the Hockey Hall of Fame as a builder. Maurice was the head coach of the Hurricanes since the firing of Laviolette, but was replaced by Kirk Muller on November 28, 2011. Muller was relieved of coaching duties on May 5, 2014. On June 19, 2014, the Hurricanes named Bill Peters their head coach, who decided to opt out of his contract following the 2017-18 season. On May 8, 2018, the Hurricanes named assistant coach and former team captain Rod Brind'Amour as the head coach for the 2018-19 season.

List of Carolina Hurricanes seasons

The Carolina Hurricanes are a professional ice hockey team based in Raleigh, North Carolina. The team is a member of the Metropolitan Division in the Eastern Conference of the NHL. This list documents the records and playoff results for all 20 seasons the Carolina Hurricanes have completed in the NHL since their relocation from Hartford, Connecticut in 1997. The Hurricanes franchise was founded in 1971 as the New England Whalers, and played seven seasons in the World Hockey Association. The team moved to the National Hockey League in 1979, and changed names to the Hartford Whalers. The franchise played a total of 18 seasons before moving to North Carolina and changing their names to the Carolina Hurricanes. The Hurricanes are the only major pro sports team located in Raleigh. They are also the only North Carolina-based major pro sports team to ever win a championship.

Carolina played its first season in the Northeast Division before moving to the Southeast Division when the NHL realigned in 1998. The Hurricanes won one Stanley Cup, in 2005–06, and two Prince of Wales Trophy as Eastern Conference champions: 2001–02 and 2005–06. Carolina has finished atop its division three times in its history. The Hurricanes have played in over 1,200 games and qualified for the Stanley Cup playoffs five times. The team's all time playoff series record in North Carolina is 41–37. The 2014–15 season represents the 18th in North Carolina.

List of Detroit Red Wings award winners

The Detroit Red Wings are a professional ice hockey team based in Detroit, Michigan. They are members of the Atlantic Division in the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL) and are one of the "Original Six" teams of the league. The franchise and its members have won numerous team and individual awards and honors. The first team trophy acquired by the club was the Prince of Wales Trophy in 1934, at the time awarded to the champion of the American Division. Their most recent team trophy was the Clarence S. Campbell Bowl in 2009, taken in honor of being the champions of the Western Conference. The team has captured the Stanley Cup as league champion eleven times, most recently in 2008.Gordie Howe is the team's most decorated player, with six wins each of the Art Ross Trophy as regular season scoring leader and the Hart Memorial Trophy as regular season most valuable player (MVP), twenty-one selections to the First and Second Team All-Stars (the most in league history), twenty-two appearances in the All-Star Game, the Lester Patrick Trophy for outstanding contributions to the sport in the United States, and the NHL Lifetime Achievement Award for long term contributions to hockey. Nicklas Lidstrom has the most awards of any defenseman, having once won the Conn Smythe Trophy as post season MVP to go along with having won the James Norris Memorial Trophy (Norris Trophy) seven times as the best defenseman in the league as well as twelve selections to the First and Second Team All-Stars and twelve selections to the All-Star Game. Terry Sawchuk leads goaltenders with three wins of the Vezina Trophy as the league's best goaltender, seven selections to the First and Second Team All-Stars, seven selections to the All-Star Game, the Lester Patrick Trophy, and the Calder Memorial Trophy as the league's best rookie. Howe, Lidstrom, and Sawchuk have all had their uniform number retired by the team and have all been inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.Three Red Wings have been the inaugural recipient of an award and three awards are named in honor of former Red Wings. In 1932 Carl Voss was named the first winner of the Calder Memorial Trophy. The first time the Norris Trophy was awarded was in 1954, when Red Kelly won. In 2007 Chris Chelios was named the first annual winner of the Mark Messier Leadership Award, the award previously having been given on a monthly basis. The Jack Adams Award, given to the best coach, is named for Jack Adams, long-time head coach and general manager of the club. The Norris Trophy takes its name from James E. Norris, who owned the club from 1932 to 1952. In 2010, the Lester B. Pearson Award was renamed the Ted Lindsay Award to recognize Ted Lindsay "for his skill, tenacity, leadership, and for his role in establishing the original Players' Association."

List of Florida Panthers head coaches

The Florida Panthers are an American professional ice hockey team based in Sunrise, Florida. They play in the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference in the National Hockey League (NHL). The team joined the NHL in 1993 as an expansion team, and won their first Eastern Conference championship in 1996. The Panthers have played their home games at the BB&T Center since 1998. The Panthers are owned by Sunrise Sports and Entertainment, and Dale Tallon is their general manager.There have been 16 head coaches for the Panthers franchise. The team's first head coach was Roger Neilson, who coached for two complete seasons from 1993 to 1995. Jacques Martin is the franchise's all-time leader for the most regular-season game wins (110), the most regular-season points (256), and is tied with Peter DeBoer for the most regular-season games coached (246); Doug MacLean is the franchise's all-time leader for the most playoff games coached (27), and the most playoff-game wins (13). Murray's brother, Terry Murray, has also coached the Panthers, right after his brother Bryan. MacLean is the only coach to have won the Prince of Wales Trophy with the Panthers; they lost the 1996 Stanley Cup Finals to the Colorado Avalanche. Neilson is the only Panthers coach to have been elected into the Hockey Hall of Fame; he was inducted as a builder. Duane Sutter and Kevin Dineen spent their entire NHL head coaching careers with the Panthers. DeBoer was the head coach of the Panthers from 2008–2011. The Panther's current head coach is Joel Quenneville.

List of National Hockey League awards

The National Hockey League presents numerous annual awards and trophies to recognize its teams and players. The oldest, and most recognizable, is the Stanley Cup. First awarded in 1893, the Stanley Cup is awarded to the NHL's playoff champion. The Stanley Cup is the third trophy to be used as the league's championship, as for the first nine years of the NHL's existence, it remained a multi-league challenge cup.Most of the trophies and all-star selections are presented at an annual awards ceremony held in late June after the conclusion of the Stanley Cup playoffs.

List of New York Islanders award winners

The New York Islanders are an American professional ice hockey team based in Uniondale, Long Island, New York. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference in the National Hockey League (NHL). The Islanders arrived in Uniondale in 1972, and play their home games at the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum.

The franchise, and its members, have won numerous team and individual awards and honors. The team won the Clarence S. Campbell Bowl trophy for having the best regular-season record in the Campbell Conference in 1978, 1979 and 1981. Following league realignment in 1981, they then captured the Prince of Wales Trophy as the Wales Conference playoff champion consecutively from 1982 to 1984. The Islanders won the Stanley Cup four consecutive years from 1980 to 1983. Denis Potvin, Bryan Trottier and Mike Bossy have won at least four awards, with all three winning the Calder Memorial Trophy as rookie of the year in their first NHL seasons. They also won other various awards, such as the Art Ross, James Norris Memorial and Lady Byng Memorial trophies. All three players earned selections to the First and Second All-Star Teams numerous times. Mike Bossy played in seven All-Star Games, the most in Islanders history.Six players have had their numbers retired by the Islanders. Of them, five players have been elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame: Denis Potvin, Bryan Trottier, Mike Bossy, Billy Smith and Clark Gillies. Other management personnel who have been inducted include Al Arbour, who coached the Islanders from 1972 to 1986 and 1988 to 1994, and Bill Torrey, who held the general manager position from 1972 to 1992.

List of Pittsburgh Penguins head coaches

The Pittsburgh Penguins are an American professional ice hockey team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. They play in the Metropolitan Division of the Eastern Conference in the National Hockey League (NHL). The franchise was established as one of six new franchises of the 1967 NHL expansion. Since their foundation, the Penguins had played their home games at the Civic Arena, which was replaced by the Consol Energy Center in 2010. The franchise is co-owned by Ronald Burkle and Mario Lemieux—the only player/owner in the NHL's modern era. According to Forbes, the Penguins were the 11th most valuable NHL franchise, at US$222 million, in 2009.There have been 22 head coaches for the Penguins franchise. The franchise's first head coach was Red Sullivan, former New York Rangers captain and coach. Sullivan was replaced by future Hockey Hall of Fame inductee Red Kelly, after two seasons. Kelly was inducted into the Hall of Fame as a player, and head coaches Craig Patrick, Bob Johnson, Scotty Bowman, and Herb Brooks were inducted as builders. Eddie Johnston—who along with Patrick and Ken Schinkel served two tenures as head coach—leads Penguins' coaches in games coached. Bob Johnson led the Penguins to their first Stanley Cup victory in 1991, but was forced to retire due to health problems after the season—he died later that year. Bowman succeeded Johnson and coached the team to its second Stanley Cup victory the following season. Michel Therrien won the Prince of Wales Trophy, as Eastern Conference champion, during the 2007–08 season. Therrien was replaced the following season by Dan Bylsma. Bylsma would lead the Penguins to their third Stanley Cup championship that same season. Bylsma was fired after the 2013-14 season and replaced by Mike Johnston. Johnston was fired during the 2015-16 season and replaced by Mike Sullivan. Sullivan led the Penguins to their fourth Stanley Cup victory that season and also their fifth Stanley cup victory in the following season in 2016-17

List of Tampa Bay Lightning head coaches

The Tampa Bay Lightning are an American professional ice hockey team based in Tampa, Florida. They play in the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference in the National Hockey League (NHL). Often referred to as the Bolts, as seen from their third jerseys, the team joined the NHL in 1992 as an expansion team, and won their first Stanley Cup championship in 2004. Having first played in the Expo Hall, and later in the ThunderDome (now known as Tropicana Field), the Lightning have played their home games at the Ice Palace, currently titled Amalie Arena, since 1996. The Lightning are owned by Jeffrey Vinik, Julien BriseBois is their general manager, and Steven Stamkos is the team captain.

There have been eight head coaches for the Lightning franchise. The team's first head coach was Terry Crisp, who coached for five seasons. John Tortorella, the only American to head coach the team, is the franchise's all-time leader for the most regular-season games coached (535), and the most regular-season points (552). Tortorella was the first Lightning coach to have won the Prince of Wales Trophy, the Stanley Cup, and to have been awarded the Jack Adams Award, all of which happened in the 2003–04 season. Steve Ludzik, and Jon Cooper have spent their entire NHL head coaching careers with the Lightning. The team's current head coach is Jon Cooper, who was named to the position on March 25, 2013. During the 2014–15 NHL season, Cooper became the second coach in team history to win the Prince of Wales Trophy. John Cooper is the franchise's all-time leader for the most regular season wins (305), playoff-games coached (68), and the most playoff-game won (36).

List of Washington Capitals head coaches

The Washington Capitals are an American professional ice hockey team based in Washington, D.C. The Capitals play in the Metropolitan Division of the Eastern Conference in the National Hockey League (NHL). The team joined the NHL in 1974 as an expansion team and won their first Eastern Conference championship in 1998. The Capitals have played their home games at the Capital One Arena, formerly known as the MCI Center and Verizon Center, since 1997. The Capitals are owned by Ted Leonsis, and Brian McClellan is their general manager.There have been 18 head coaches for the Capitals franchise. The franchise's first head coach was Jim Anderson, who coached for less than a season. Bryan Murray is the franchise's all-time leader for the most regular-season games coached (672), the most regular-season game wins (343), the most regular-season points (769), the most playoff games coached (53), and the most playoff-game wins (24). Murray's brother, Terry, has also coached the Capitals, right after his brother Bryan. Roger Crozier, who only coached one game for the Capitals, is the franchise's all-time leader for the least regular-season game points (0). Ron Wilson won the Prince of Wales Trophy with the Capitals, but lost the 1998 Stanley Cup Finals against the Detroit Red Wings. Bryan Murray, Bruce Boudreau and Barry Trotz are the only Capitals coaches to have won the Jack Adams Award. None of the Capitals coaches have been elected into the Hockey Hall of Fame as a builder. Anderson, Danny Belisle, Gary Green, Crozier, Glen Hanlon, Dale Hunter and Adam Oates have spent their entire NHL head coaching careers with the Capitals.Dale Hunter, who replaced Boudreau on November 28, 2011, resigned on May 14, 2012 citing personal reasons. Adam Oates was named the Capitals' 16th head coach on June 26, 2012. After having missed the playoffs for the second time in seven years, the Washington Capitals hired former Nashville Predators coach Barry Trotz on May 26, 2014. Trotz resigned as head coach in June 2018, after winning the Stanley Cup for the first time in the franchise's history. Later that same month, the team promoted Todd Reirden, a Capitals assistant coach since 2014, to the head coaching position.

NHL Conference Finals

The National Hockey League (NHL) Conference Finals are the Eastern Conference and Western Conference championship series of the NHL. The Conference Finals are best-of-seven series, and comprise the third round of the Stanley Cup playoffs. The two series are played in mid-to-late May (early June in 1995 and 2013, due to labour disputes that delayed the start of the season). The winners of the Eastern and Western Conference Finals receive the Prince of Wales Trophy and Clarence S. Campbell Bowl, respectively, and advance to face each other in the final round.

O'Brien Trophy (ice hockey)

The O'Brien Trophy, or O'Brien Cup, as labelled on the trophy itself, is a retired trophy that was awarded in the National Hockey Association (NHA) and the National Hockey League (NHL) ice hockey leagues of North America from 1910 to 1950. It was originally donated to the NHA by Canadian Senator M. J. O'Brien in honour of his son, Ambrose O'Brien. The Cup was fabricated using silver from an O'Brien mine.

The Cup has been awarded under four definitions. From 1910 through 1917, it was awarded to the NHA champion. In 1921, the Cup was transferred to the NHL and awarded to the NHL champion until 1927. From 1928 until 1938, it was awarded to the Canadian Division champion. Starting with the 1938–39 season, it was awarded to the NHL playoff runner-up. In 1950, the Cup was retired and has not been awarded since. In total, the Cup has been awarded in 41 seasons to twelve different teams. The Cup is now in the collection of the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Presidents' Trophy

The Presidents' Trophy (French: Trophée des présidents) is an award presented by the National Hockey League (NHL) to the team that finishes with the most points (i.e. best record) during the NHL regular season. If two teams tie for the most points, then the Trophy goes to the team with the most wins. The Presidents' Trophy has been awarded 33 times to 17 different teams since its inception during the 1985–86 season.As the team with the best regular season record, the Presidents' Trophy winner is guaranteed home-ice advantage in all four rounds of the Stanley Cup playoffs, provided they advance that far. However, it does not guarantee that success; only eight of these winners have gone on to win the Stanley Cup. Three other teams reached the Stanley Cup Finals, but failed to win. The last team to win both the Presidents' Trophy and the Stanley Cup in the same season was the 2012–13 Chicago Blackhawks. The only team to accomplish this more than once is the Detroit Red Wings.

Royal County of Berkshire Polo Club

The Royal County of Berkshire Polo Club is a polo club located near Windsor, Berkshire and home to the Prince of Wales tournament - one of the most coveted high goal trophies in Polo. It is set in a 230-acre estate, one mile from Ascot Racecourse, and comprises six polo fields, an arena, clubhouse and a polo school. The club is also home to The Arena Gold Cup, the most prestigious winter season tournament and The Arena Polo Masters, currently the highest goal game played in the winter.Established in 1985, by music mogul Bryan Morrison, the club’s founding member and patron was H.R.H. The Prince of Wales with both the Duke of Cambridge and Prince Harry as players.

Team
Individual
Defunct

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