Prince Kuhio Federal Building

The Prince Kūhiō Federal Building, formally the Prince Jonah Kūhiō Kalanianaʻole Federal Building and United States Courthouse, is the official seat of the United States federal government and its local branches of various agencies and departments in the state of Hawaiʻi. Its address is 300 Ala Moana Boulevard, Honolulu, Hawaii 96850.[1]

The building was completed in 1977 with a total of 929,857 square feet (86,386.5 m2) of working space.[2] It houses the United States District Court for the District of Hawaii. the United States Attorney for the District of Hawaii, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (Honolulu Division), the offices of Hawaii's U.S. Senators, the offices of Hawaii's U.S. Representatives for Hawaii's 1st congressional district and Hawaii's 2nd congressional district, and branch offices of the United States Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security, United States Department of Justice, Central Intelligence Agency, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Internal Revenue Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, among other entities.[3][4]

The building was named after Prince Jonah Kūhiō Kalanianaʻole, heir to the throne of the overthrown Kingdom of Hawaiʻi, who served as Republican territorial delegate to the United States Congress from 1903 through 1922.[5] It was built on part of the former US Army Fort Armstrong, which was named for Samuel C. Armstrong (1839–1893), son of Hawaiian missionaries.[6] Across Ala Moana Boulevard is the Aloha Tower at the Honolulu harbor. Other parts of Fort Armstrong became a container terminal for military supplies.[7]

The Prince Kūhiō Building was constructed to replace the aging Federal Court, Customs House and Post Office building fronting ʻIolani Palace and adjacent to Aliʻiōlani Hale which had been built in 1922 and expanded in 1931.[8] After being mostly vacant, the old building was renovated and put up for sale. The old building was given back to the state of Hawaiʻi and was renamed the King David Kalākaua Building in December 2003.[9]

Construction of the Prince Kūhiō Federal Building was not without controversy. The General Services Administration wanted a simple tall office tower, while local architects argued for a building more appropriate to Hawaii.[10] Statutes provided that all buildings between the shoreline and the foot of Punchbowl Crater could not be taller than the Hawaiʻi State Capitol. The federal government, not legally limited by local statutes, defied the statutes and constructed the building as the tallest structure in the path of the capitol building's view of the shoreline. The complex includes ten stories of offices (including a penthouse level), connected by an enclosed bridge to a six-story courthouse building (including basement).[11]

The Prince Kūhiō Federal Building was designed by Joseph G.F. Farrell's firm Architects Hawaii. Other government buildings designed by the firm include the capitol building of Palau, which opened in 2006.[12] The building was selected for $121 million of renovations as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The plan is to make the building more efficient by upgrading its mechanical, electrical, fire-safety, and plumbing systems.[4] It had already been cited as an efficient building by the Energy Star program.[2] Traces of asbestos were discovered during the first phase.[13] The second phase of construction was approved in March 2011.[11]

Prince Jonah Kūhiō Kalanianaʻole Federal Building and United States Courthouse
Prince Kuhio Federal Building
The building viewed near Honolulu Harbor
General information
TypeCourthouse and office building
LocationHonolulu, Hawaii
Coordinates21°18′13″N 157°51′44″W / 21.30361°N 157.86222°W
Completed1977
OwnerUnited States federal government
Technical details
Floor area929,857 square feet (86,386.5 m2)
Design and construction
ArchitectArchitects Hawaii
Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole Federal Building
The building as seen from its eastern corner

References

  1. ^ "Hawaii Buildings and Properties". US General Services Administration web site. Retrieved April 2, 2011.
  2. ^ a b "Prince Kuhio Kalanianole Federal Building/Courthouse". US Energy Star web site. Retrieved April 2, 2011.
  3. ^ "Federal Departments" (PDF). Directory of State, County and Federal Officials in Hawaii. April 1, 2005. Retrieved April 2, 2011.
  4. ^ a b "Prince Jonah Kuhio Kanaianaole Federal Building, Honolulu". US General Services Administration web site. Retrieved April 2, 2011.
  5. ^ Pat Omandam (September 20, 1999). "Kuhio's advice still relevant today". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. Retrieved April 2, 2011.
  6. ^ Mary Kawena Pukui, Samuel Hoyt Elbert and Esther T. Mookini (2004). "lookup of Armstrong ". in Place Names of Hawai'i. Ulukau, the Hawaiian Electronic Library, University of Hawaii Press. Retrieved April 2, 2011.
  7. ^ "Fort Armstrong Container Terminal Improvements" (PDF). Environmental Assessment. August 1992. Retrieved April 2, 2011.
  8. ^ "U.S. Post Office, Court House, and Custom House; Honolulu, Hawaii". History of the Federal Judiciary. US Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved April 2, 2011.
  9. ^ Gordon Y.K. Pang (December 30, 2003). "Old post office assumes new role". Honolulu Advertiser. Retrieved April 2, 2011.
  10. ^ A. Kam Napier (December 2008). "Rare Editions". Honolulu Magazine. Retrieved April 2, 2011.
  11. ^ a b "Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole Federal Building and Courthouse" (PDF). Prospectus Number: PHI-0011-H012. General Services Administration. Archived from the original (PDF) on May 22, 2011. Retrieved April 2, 2011.
  12. ^ Mike Leidemann (November 12, 2006). "Pride in Palau for new Capitol". Honolulu Advertiser. Retrieved April 2, 2011.
  13. ^ June Watanabe (September 1, 2010). "Federal Building renovations prompt asbestos concerns". Honolulu Star-Advertiser. Retrieved April 2, 2011.

Coordinates: 21°18′13″N 157°51′44″W / 21.30361°N 157.86222°W

Federal building

A federal building is a building housing local offices of various government departments and agencies in countries with a federal system, especially when the central government is referred to as the "federal government".

There are design issues specific to federal buildings, relating to their multipurpose functions and concerns related to the fact of their association with the government. For example, as symbols of the government, they may potentially be focus of protests or threats, so there are security issues. Also environmental impacts and environmentally sound design may be more important.

A committee set up by President John F. Kennedy in 1962 issued "Guiding Principles for Federal Architecture". Towards improving design of federal buildings in the United States, "the committee recommended architecture that would convey the 'dignity, enterprise, vigor, and stability of the American Government.' Designers and officials were encouraged to pay special attention to site selection and layout, including landscape development."

Some architects specialize in federal building designs.

Hawaii

Hawaii ( (listen) hə-WY-ee; Hawaiian: Hawaiʻi [həˈvɐjʔi]) is a state of the United States of America. It is the only state located in the Pacific Ocean and the only state composed entirely of islands.

The state encompasses nearly the entire Hawaiian archipelago, 137 islands spread over 1,500 miles (2,400 km). The volcanic archipelago is physiographically and ethnologically part of the Polynesian subregion of Oceania. At the southeastern end of the archipelago, the eight main islands are, in order from northwest to southeast: Niʻihau, Kauaʻi, Oʻahu, Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, Kahoʻolawe, Maui, and Hawaiʻi. The last is the largest island in the group; it is often called the "Big Island" or "Hawaiʻi Island" to avoid confusion with the state or archipelago.

Hawaii is the 8th smallest geographically and the 11th least populous, but the 13th most densely populated of the 50 states. It is the only state with an Asian American plurality. Hawaii has over 1.4 million permanent residents, along with many visitors and U.S. military personnel. The state capital and largest city is Honolulu on the island of Oʻahu. The state's ocean coastline is about 750 miles (1,210 km) long, the fourth longest in the U.S., after the coastlines of Alaska, Florida, and California. Hawaii is the most recent state to join the union, on August 21, 1959. It was an independent nation until 1898.

Hawaii's diverse natural scenery, warm tropical climate, abundance of public beaches, oceanic surroundings, and active volcanoes make it a popular destination for tourists, surfers, biologists, and volcanologists. Because of its central location in the Pacific and 19th-century labor migration, Hawaii's culture is strongly influenced by North American and East Asian cultures, in addition to its indigenous Hawaiian culture.

Hawaii's 2nd congressional district

Hawaii's 2nd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Hawaii. The district encompasses all rural and most suburban areas of Oahu/Honolulu County, as well as the entire state outside of Oahu. Besides Honolulu, the district includes the counties of Kauai, Maui, Kalawao and Hawaii ("the Big Island"). The district spans 331 miles. The most populous community entirely within the district is Hilo. Major segments of the economy include tourism, ranching and agriculture, especially pineapple and sugarcane cultivation.

The district is represented by Democrat Tulsi Gabbard.

Jonah Kūhiō Kalanianaʻole

Jonah Kūhiō Kalanianaʻole (March 26, 1871 – January 7, 1922) was a prince of the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi until it was overthrown by a coalition of American and European businessmen in 1893. He later went on to become a representative in the Territory of Hawaii as delegate to the United States Congress, and as such is the only person ever elected to that body who had been born into royalty.

King David Kalakaua Building

The King David Kalakaua Building in Honolulu, Hawaii is a government building formerly known as the U.S. Post Office, Customhouse, and Courthouse. It was the official seat of administration in the Territory of Hawaii and state of Hawaii for the United States federal government.

King Kamehameha I Day

King Kamehameha I Day on June 11 is a public holiday in the U.S. state of Hawaii. It honors Kamehameha the Great, the monarch who first established the unified Kingdom of Hawaiʻi—comprising the Hawaiian Islands of Niʻihau, Kauaʻi, Oʻahu, Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, Kahoʻolawe, Maui, and Hawaiʻi. In 1883 a statue of King Kamehameha was dedicated in Honolulu by King David Kalākaua (this was a duplicate, because the original statue was temporarily lost at sea but was recovered and is now located in North Kohala, island of Hawaiʻi). There are duplicates of this statue in Emancipation Hall at the Capitol Visitor Center in Washington, D.C. and in Hilo, island of Hawaiʻi.

List of United States federal courthouses

Following is a list of United States federal courthouses, which will comprise all courthouses currently or formerly in use for the housing of United States federal courts. Each entry indicates the name of the building along with an image, if available, its location and the jurisdiction it covers, the dates during which it was used for each such jurisdiction, and, if applicable the person for whom it was named, and the date of renaming. Dates of use will not necessarily correspond with the dates of construction or demolition of a building, as pre-existing structures may be adapted or court use, and former court buildings may later be put to other uses. Also, the official name of the building may be changed at some point after its use as a federal court building has been initiated.

The list contains approximately 687 courthouses.

List of United States federal courthouses in Hawaii

Following is a list of current and former courthouses of the United States federal court system located in Hawaii. Each entry indicates the name of the building along with an image, if available, its location and the jurisdiction it covers, the dates during which it was used for each such jurisdiction, and, if applicable the person for whom it was named, and the date of renaming. Dates of use will not necessarily correspond with the dates of construction or demolition of a building, as pre-existing structures may be adapted or court use, and former court buildings may later be put to other uses. Also, the official name of the building may be changed at some point after its use as a federal court building has been initiated.

Louis Ayres

William Louis Ayres (1874–November 30, 1947), better known by his professional name Louis Ayres, was an American architect who was one of the most prominent designers of monuments, memorials, and buildings in the nation in the early part of the 20th century. His style is characterized as Medievalist, often emphasizing elements of Romanesque Revival and Italian Renaissance, and Byzantine Revival architecture. He is best known for designing the United States Memorial Chapel at the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial and the Herbert C. Hoover U.S. Department of Commerce Building.

Samuel C. Armstrong

Samuel Chapman Armstrong (January 30, 1839 – May 11, 1893), the son of Hawaiian missionaries, rose through the Union Army during the American Civil War, to become a General leading units of African American soldiers. He became best known as an American educator, founding and becoming the first principal of the normal school for African-American and later Native American pupils in Virginia which later became Hampton University. He also founded the university's museum, the Hampton University Museum, which is the oldest African-American museum in the country, and the oldest museum in Virginia.

United States Attorney for the District of Hawaii

The United States Attorney for the District of Hawaii — also known as the United States Attorney and U.S. Attorney — is the chief law enforcement officer representing the federal government in the United States District Court for the District of Hawaii and principal authority of the United States Department of Justice in the state of Hawaii. He or she administers the duties of the office from the Prince Kuhio Federal Building in downtown Honolulu near the Aloha Tower and Honolulu Harbor.

The Judiciary Act of 1789 describes the role of the United States Attorney as, "A person learned in the law to act as attorney for the United States whose duty it shall be to prosecute in each district all delinquents for crimes and offenses cognizable under the authority of the United States and all civil actions in which the United States shall be concerned." The United States Attorney is appointed by the President of the United States and upon confirmation of the United States Senate serves a term of four years. A member of the Executive Office for U.S. Attorneys (EOUSA), he or she has been historically chosen from the same political party that the President professes membership.

The United States Attorney administers a staff consisting of twenty-eight Assistant United States Attorneys. He also has ordinary jurisdiction over all civilian and military Special Assistant United States Attorneys.

United States District Court for the District of Hawaii

The United States District Court for the District of Hawaii (in case citations, D. Haw.) is the principal trial court of the United States Federal Court System in the state of Hawaii. The court's territorial jurisdiction encompasses the state of Hawaii and the territories of Midway Atoll, Wake Island, Johnston Atoll, Kingman Reef, Palmyra Atoll, Baker Island, Howland Island, and Jarvis Island. It is located at the Prince Kuhio Federal Building in downtown Honolulu, fronting the Aloha Tower and Honolulu Harbor. The court hears both civil and criminal cases as a court of law and equity. A branch of the district court is the United States Bankruptcy Court which also has chambers in the federal building. The United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit has appellate jurisdiction over cases coming out of the District of Hawaii (except for patent claims and claims against the U.S. government under the Tucker Act, which are appealed to the Federal Circuit). The United States Attorney for the District of Hawaii represents the United States in all civil and criminal cases within her district. The current United States Attorney is Kenji M. Price since January 5, 2018.

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