Prime Minister of Sweden

The Prime Minister (Swedish: statsminister, literally "Minister of the State") is the head of government in Sweden. Before the creation of the office of a Prime Minister in 1876, Sweden did not have a head of government separate from its head of state, namely the King, in whom the executive authority was vested. Louis Gerhard De Geer, the architect behind the new bicameral Riksdag of 1866 that replaced the centuries-old Riksdag of the Estates, became the first officeholder in 1876.

The current Prime Minister of Sweden is Stefan Löfven, leader of the Swedish Social Democratic Party[3] who was chosen for a second term on 18 January 2019[4], even after having been ousted following the general elections on 9 September 2018.[5]

Prime Minister of Sweden
Sveriges statsminister
Lilla riksvapnet - Riksarkivet Sverige
Flag of Sweden
State flag
Stefan Löfven efter slutdebatten i SVT 2014 (cropped)
Incumbent
Stefan Löfven

since 3 October 2014
StyleHis/Her excellency
was used up to the 1970s in Sweden; but is still used in diplomatic writing[1]
Member ofThe Government
European Council
Reports toThe Riksdag
ResidenceSager House
SeatRosenbad, Stockholm, Sweden
NominatorThe Speaker of the Riksdag
following consultations with the party leaders in the Riksdag
AppointerThe Speaker of the Riksdag
following a vote in the Riksdag
Term lengthNo term limit
serves as long as the incumbent has majority support in the Riksdag
Constituting instrument1974 Instrument of Government
Inaugural holderLouis Gerhard De Geer
Formation20 March 1876
DeputyDeputy to the Prime Minister
Salaryannual: 2,064,000 SEK[2]
197,532 / $230,926 / £174,868
(1 July 2018 – 30 June 2019)
Websitehttp://www.sweden.gov.se/sb/d/2058

History

Before 1876, when the office of a single prime minister was created, Sweden did not have a head of government separate from the King. Historically though, the most senior member of the Privy Council (during the absolute rule this was the Lord High Chancellor) had certain similarities to the office of a head of government. This was most evident during the so-called Age of Liberty from 1718 to 1772, when powers of the Monarch were greatly reduced and the President of the Privy Council became the most powerful political figure in Sweden.

At the adoption of the new Instrument of Government of 1809, the two offices of Prime Minister for Justice (Swedish: Justitiestatsminister) and Prime Minister for Foreign Affairs (Swedish: Utrikesstatsminister) were created, though their roles were no more than just the heads of their respective ministries. When the office of the Prime Minister was created in 1876, the Prime Ministers for Justice and Foreign Affairs were thus subsequently demoted to Minister for Justice and Minister for Foreign Affairs. Unlike the Minister for Justice, the Minister for Foreign Affairs did however continue to be styled as "Excellency", an honour shared only with the Prime Minister.[6][7] From 1917, parliamentarian principles were definitively established in Sweden and the Monarch ceased to exercise their constitutional authority to appoint the Prime Minister and the Councillors of State (cabinet ministers) at their own discretion. From that time onward, the Prime Minister depended on the support of a majority in the Riksdag. Over time, the Prime Minister came to de facto exercise the Royal prerogatives. However, the Swedish term used for the Government during this period, still was Kungl. Maj:t, an abbreviation of Kunglig Majestät (English: Royal Majesty).

Until 1974, the executive authority in Sweden had been exercised through the King in Council. Constitutional reform provided a new Instrument of Government which de jure established the parliamentary system and created a cabinet government with constitutional powers not derived from the Crown.

List of Prime Ministers

Living former Prime Ministers

Ingvar Carlsson på Idrottsgalan 2013

Ingvar Carlsson
born 9 November 1934 (age 84)
served 1986–1991 and 1994–1996

Carl Bildt under nationaldagsfirande vid Skansen 2009

Carl Bildt
born 15 July 1949 (age 69)
served 1991–1994

Goran Persson, Sveriges statsminister, under nordiskt statsministermotet i Reykjavik 2005

Göran Persson
born 20 January 1949 (age 70)
served 1996–2006

Fredrik Reinfeldt 2014-07-16

Fredrik Reinfeldt
born 4 August 1965 (age 53)
served 2006–2014

Duties

Whenever a Prime Minister resigns, dies, or is forced from office by the Riksdag, the Speaker of the Riksdag asks the Prime Minister (or their deputy) to keep the government as a caretaker government until a successor has been elected. The Speaker then holds consultations with the party leaders and appoints a Prime Minister-designate, who is submitted for approval to the Riksdag. If the Prime Minister-designate is approved, the Prime Minister chooses which and how many ministers are to be included in the government.[8]

With the exception of the Prime Minister, cabinet ministers (Swedish: statsråd) do not need the approval of the Riksdag, but they can be forced to resign by a vote of no confidence. If the Prime Minister is forced by a vote of no confidence to resign, the entire cabinet falls, and the process of electing a new Prime minister starts. The Prime Minister can dissolve the Riksdag, even after receiving a vote of no confidence, except during the first three months after an election.

The Instrument of Government requires that the Prime Minister appoint a member of the cabinet as Deputy Prime Minister, to perform the duties of the Prime Minister if the Prime Minister cannot. However, if a Deputy Prime Minister is absent or has not been appointed, the senior minister in the cabinet becomes acting head of government. If more than one minister has equal tenure, the eldest assumes the position (see Swedish governmental line of succession for the present governmental line of succession).

Constitutionally, the Prime Minister's position is stronger than that of his counterparts in Denmark and Norway. Since 1975, the Prime Minister has been both de jure and de facto chief executive, with powers and duties specifically enumerated in the Instrument of Government. In the two neighboring Scandinavian monarchies, the monarch is the nominal chief executive, but is bound by convention to act on the advice of the ministers. However, the so-called Torekov Compromise reached in 1971 by the major political parties, codified with the Instrument of Government that went into effect in 1975, stripped the Swedish monarch of even a nominal role in governmental affairs, thus codifying actual practices that had been in place since the definitive establishment of parliamentary government in 1917.

Amenities

Office and residences

The government offices, including the Prime Minister's office, are located at Rosenbad in central Stockholm, straight across the water from the Riksdag building on Helgeandsholmen.

In 1991 Sager House (or the "Sager Palace" as it was previously called) was acquired, and since 1995 it has served as the private residence of the Prime Minister.

Harpsund, a manor house in Flen Municipality, Södermanland County, has served as a country residence for the Prime Minister since 1953. The manor is also frequently used for governmental conferences and informal summits between the government, industry and organisations in Sweden.

Salary

The salaries of the cabinet ministers, including the Prime Minister, is decided by and is the subject of annual review by the Statsrådsarvodesnämnden ("Cabinet Ministers' Salary Committee") of the Riksdag. Since 1 July 2018 the Prime Minister's monthly salary is 172,000 SEK (16,461 / $19,244 / £14,572) or 2,064,000 SEK (€197,532 / $230,926 / £174,868) per year.[2]

Gallery

Rosenbad 2006

The Rosenbad building has functioned as the Prime Minister's Office (Statsrådsberedningen) since 1981.

Sagerska palatset Stockholm Sweden

The Sager Palace is the Prime Minister's official residence.

Harpsund2

Harpsund Manor has been used as the Prime Minister's country residence since 1953.

Kanslihuset 2010

Kanslihuset was where the Prime Minister's Office was located prior to 1981. Nowadays it houses offices of the Riksdag.

See also

References

  1. ^ UN Protocol and Liaison Service Archived 16 November 2012 at WebCite
  2. ^ a b "Statsrådsarvoden och ersättningar (Swedish)". Regeringen.se.
  3. ^ Swedish parliament confirms Social Democrats' Lofven as new PM. Reuters, 2 October 2014
  4. ^ [1]. Sweden.se official Twitter account, 18 January 2019
  5. ^ Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Löfven ousted in no-confidence vote. The Local, September 25, 2018
  6. ^ Sveriges statskalender 1915, runeberg.org. Retrieved on 12 June 2013.(in Swedish)
  7. ^ Sveriges statskalender 1964, runeberg.org. Retrieved on 12 June 2013.(in Swedish)
  8. ^ "Forming a government". Sveriges Riksdag. 2016-12-06. Retrieved 2018-03-24.
Bibliography

External links

1905 in Sweden

Events from the year 1905 in Sweden

Assassination of Olof Palme

On Friday, 28 February 1986, at 23:21 CET (22:21 UTC), Olof Palme, Prime Minister of Sweden, was fatally wounded by a single gunshot while walking home from a cinema with his wife Lisbet Palme on the central Stockholm street Sveavägen. Lisbet Palme was slightly wounded by a second shot. The couple did not have bodyguards at the time.

Christer Pettersson, who had previously been convicted of manslaughter, was convicted of the murder in 1988 after having been identified as the killer by Palme's wife. However, on appeal to Svea Court of Appeal, he was acquitted. A petition for a new trial, filed by the prosecutor, was denied by the Supreme Court of Sweden. Pettersson died in late September 2004, legally declared not guilty of the Palme assassination. The case remains unsolved and has given rise to conspiracy theories.

Christian Lundeberg

Christian Lundeberg (14 July 1842 – 10 November 1911) was a Swedish politician who served as Prime Minister of Sweden from 2 August to 7 November 1905.

Deputy Prime Minister of Sweden

The Swedish constitution allows the Prime Minister to appoint one of the Ministers in the cabinet as Deputy Prime Minister (statsministers ställföreträdare, sometimes unofficially known as vice statsminister), in case the Prime Minister for some reason is prevented from performing his or her duties. If a Deputy Prime Minister has not been appointed, the Minister in the cabinet who has served the longest time (and if there are several with equal experience the one who is oldest) takes over as head of government (these are marked in italic in the table below).

A Deputy Prime Minister can only serve as Prime Minister in a temporary function, as the resignation of a Prime Minister automatically includes the entire cabinet, and the Instrument of Government of Sweden requires the Speaker of the Riksdag to dismiss the cabinet in the case of the death of the Prime Minister.

Felix Hamrin

Felix Teodor Hamrin (14 January 1875 – 27 November 1937) was a Swedish politician. He was the leader of the liberal Freeminded People's Party and served as Prime Minister of Sweden from 6 August to 24 September 1932.Hamrin was born in Mönsterås in Kalmar County. His father was a dealer in leather. He married Elizabeth "Lizzie" Pennycock in 1900. They had seven children.

After studying at a business school in Gothenburg, he ran a wholesaling business in Jönköping from 1903 to 1930. He entered the Riksdag at the young age of 37, and under Carl Gustaf Ekman he served as Minister of Trade from 1926 to 1928 and as Minister of Finance from 1930 to 1932. When Ekman was forced to resign shortly before the elections in 1932 due to the Kreuger crash, Hamrin became prime minister. He resigned after the election because the Freeminded People's Party had suffered serious losses in the election. His term of office was only 50 days, giving him the record for serving the shortest amount of time as prime minister of Sweden.

He served briefly as party leader for the Freeminded People's Party after Ekman, and in the newly formed People's Party until a new party leader was chosen in January 1935. He also served as the governor of Jönköping County from 1930 to 1937. His most important political tasks were to fight the economic effects of the early years of the Depression in Sweden through severe economy measures, and to mitigate the effects of the Kreuger crash.

He died in Jönköping on 27 November 1937.

Hjalmar Branting

Karl Hjalmar Branting (23 November 1860 – 24 February 1925) was a Swedish politician. He was the leader of the Swedish Social Democratic Party (1907–1925), and Prime Minister during three separate periods (1920, 1921–1923, and 1924–1925). When Branting came to power in 1920, he was the first Social Democratic Prime Minister of Sweden. When he took office for a second term after the general election of 1921, he became the first socialist politician in Europe to do so following elections with universal suffrage. In 1921, Sweden's Prime Minister Hjalmar Branting shared the Nobel Peace Prize with the Norwegian secretary-general of the Inter-Parliamentary Union Christian Lous Lange.

Ingvar Carlsson

Gösta Ingvar Carlsson (born 9 November 1934) is a Swedish politician who twice served as Prime Minister of Sweden, first from 1986 to 1991 and again from 1994 to 1996. He was leader of the Swedish Social Democratic Party from 1986 to 1996. He is best known for leading Sweden into the European Union.

Carlsson was a member of the Riksdag from 1965 to 1996 representing the constituency of Stockholm County (until 1970 in the lower house). He served as Minister of Education from 1969 to 1973, as Minister of Housing in 1973 and again from 1974 to 1976, and as Minister of Environmental affairs from 1985 to 1986. He served as Deputy Prime Minister from 1982 to 1986, and assumed office as Prime Minister of Sweden upon the assassination of Prime Minister Olof Palme in 1986.

List of spouses of Swedish prime ministers

This is a list of spouses of the Prime Minister of Sweden.

The spouse of the Prime Minister of Sweden is not an official office, although she or he plays a spouse role during official visits.

The current Prime Minister of Sweden, Stefan Löfven, is married to Ulla Löfvén since 2003.

Minister for Democracy (Sweden)

The Minister for Democracy (Swedish: Demokratiministern) is a cabinet minister within the Swedish Government and appointed by the Prime Minister of Sweden.

The minister is responsible for issues regarding democracy. The current Minister for Democracy is Alice Bah Kuhnke, appointed on 3 October 2014. She concurrently serves as Minister for Culture and Democracy

Minister for Enterprise (Sweden)

The Minister for Enterprise (Swedish: Sveriges näringsminister) is a cabinet minister within the Swedish Government and appointed by the Prime Minister of Sweden. The cabinet minister is head of the Ministry of Enterprise, Energy and Communications.

Until 1991, the office was named Minister for Industry. However, the official name since then is Minister for Enterprise.

The cabinet minister is responsible for issues regarding businesses and industry. The current Minister for Enterprise is also responsible for regional development. Ibrahim Baylan holds the office since 21 January 2019.

Minister for Financial Markets (Sweden)

The Minister for Financial Markets (Swedish: finansmarknadsminister) is a cabinet minister within the Swedish Government and appointed by the Prime Minister of Sweden.

The minister is responsible for issues regarding financial markets, municipalities and counties, gambling and state-owned companies. The Minister for Financial Markets is also deputy Minister for Finance. The current Minister for Financial Markets is Per Bolund, appointed on 3 October 2014.

Minister for Gender Equality (Sweden)

The Minister for Gender Equality (Swedish: Jämställdhetsministern) is a cabinet minister within the Swedish Government and appointed by the Prime Minister of Sweden.

The minister is responsible for issues regarding gender equality, popular education and policies for the civil society. The current Minister for Gender Equality is Åsa Lindhagen, appointed on 21 January 2019.

Minister for Home Affairs (Sweden)

The Minister for Home Affairs (Swedish: Inrikesministern) is a cabinet minister within the Swedish Government and appointed by the Prime Minister of Sweden.

The minister is responsible for issues regarding the Swedish Police Authority and combating terrorism. The current Minister for Home Affairs is Mikael Damberg, appointed on 21 January 2019.

Minister for Integration (Sweden)

The Minister for Integration (Swedish: Integrationsminister) was a cabinet minister within the Swedish Government between 1996 and 2014. The cabinet minister was appointed by the Prime Minister of Sweden.

The minister was responsible for issues regarding integration, discrimination, human rights at the national level, Swedish citizenship and minorities. The last Minister for Integration was Erik Ullenhag, who served from 2010 to 2014.

Minister for International Development Cooperation (Sweden)

The Minister for International Development Cooperation is the cabinet minister in the Swedish Government responsible for foreign aid and global development. The cabinet minister is, like the rest of the Swedish Government, nominated and appointed by the Prime Minister of Sweden who in turn is appointed by the Swedish Riksdag. The cabinet minister belongs to the Ministry for Foreign Affairs.

The position was established in 1954 and the first officeholder was Ulla Lindström. Lindström is also the person who has served in this capacity during the longest time, 12 years. The current cabinet minister to hold the office is Peter Eriksson, appointed on 21 January 2019.

Minister for the Climate (Sweden)

The Minister for the Climate (Swedish: Klimatministern) is a cabinet minister within the Swedish Government and appointed by the Prime Minister of Sweden.

The minister is responsible for issues regarding the Climate. The current Minister for the Climate is Isabella Lövin, appointed on 25 May 2016. She concurrently serves as Minister for International Development Cooperation and Deputy Prime Minister (titular)

Norra begravningsplatsen

Norra begravningsplatsen, literally "The Northern Cemetery" in Swedish, is a major cemetery of the Stockholm urban area, located in Solna Municipality. Inaugurated on 9 June 1827, it is the burial site for a number of Swedish notables.

Ola Ullsten

Stig Kjell Olof (Ola) Ullsten (23 June 1931 – 28 May 2018) was a Swedish politician and diplomat who was Prime Minister of Sweden from 1978 to 1979 and leader of the Liberal People's Party from 1978 to 1983. He also served as Deputy Prime Minister briefly in 1978 and then again from 1980 to 1982 and served as Minister for Foreign Affairs from 1979 to 1982.

Oscar von Sydow

Oscar Fredrik von Sydow (12 July 1873 – 19 August 1936) was a Swedish politician who served as Prime Minister of Sweden from 23 February to 13 October 1921.

Prime Ministers of Sweden
1809 Instrument of Government (1876–1974)
1974 Instrument of Government (1975–present)
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