Prime Minister of Georgia

The Prime Minister of Georgia (Georgian: საქართველოს პრემიერ-მინისტრი, translit.: sakartvelos p'remier-minist'ri) is the head of government and chief executive of Georgia. The Prime Minister organizes, directs, and controls the functions of the Government and signs the legal acts of the government. They appoint and dismiss ministers in the government. The Prime Minister represents Georgia in foreign relations and concludes international treaties on behalf of Georgia. They are accountable for the activities of the Government before the Parliament of Georgia.[1]

The Prime Minister is nominated by a political party that has secured the best results in the parliamentary election. The nominee must win the confidence vote of the Parliament and then be appointed by the President of Georgia.[2]

Prime Minister of Georgia
Greater coat of arms of Georgia
Mamuka Bakhtadze
Incumbent
Mamuka Bakhtadze

since 20 June 2018
AppointerPresident of Georgia
Term length4 years
Inaugural holderBessarion Gugushvili
Formation23 August 1991
Salary4,250 ₾
Websitehttp://gov.ge/index.php?lang_id=ENG

History

The office of Prime Minister under the name of the Chairman of Government was introduced in Georgia upon its declaration of independence in May 1918. It was abolished with the Soviet takeover of the country in February 1921. The newly independent Georgia established the position of Prime Minister in August 1991, only to be abolished de facto in the aftermath of the January 1992 military coup and legally in the 1995 Constitution. The office was reintroduced in the February 2004 constitutional amendment and further modified as a result of series of amendments passed between 2011 and 2018.

Qualifications

The office of Prime Minister may not be held by a citizen of Georgia who is simultaneously the citizen of a foreign country.[3]

Appointment

The Prime Minister is nominated by a political party that has secured the best results in the parliamentary election. The nominee for premiership and ministerial candidates selected by them must win the confidence vote of the Parliament and then, within 2 days of a vote of confidence, be appointed by the President of Georgia. If the President does not appoint the Prime Minister within the established time frame, the Prime Minister is considered appointed. If the parliamentary vote of confidence is not passed within the established time frame, the President dissolves the Parliament no earlier than two weeks and no later than three weeks after the respective time frame has expired, and calls extraordinary parliamentary election.[2]

Functions

The Prime Minister of Georgia is the head of the Government, responsible for government activities and appointment and dismissal of ministers. They are accountable before the parliament. Prime Minister signs the legal acts of the government[1] and countersigns some of the acts issued by the President of Georgia.[4]

The Prime Minister also has the right to make decision on the use of the Defense Forces during martial law without the Parliament's approval.[5] During the martial law, the Prime Minister becomes a member of the National Defense Council, a consultative body chaired by the President of Georgia.[6]

List of Heads of Government of Georgia (1918–present)

Democratic Republic of Georgia (1918–1921)

Prime Ministers
No. Picture Name
(Birth–Death)
Began office Left office Party Title(s)
1 Noeramishvilipic Noe Ramishvili
(1881–1930)
26 May 1918 24 June 1918 Social Democratic Party of Georgia Chairman of Government
2 Noe Schordania Noe Zhordania
(1868–1953)
24 June 1918 18 March 1921 Social Democratic Party of Georgia Chairman of Government

Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic (1921–1991)

No. Picture Name
(Birth–Death)
Began office Left office Party Title(s)
1 Polikarp Mdivani Polikarp Mdivani
(1887–1937)
7 March 1922 April 1922 Communist Party of Georgia Chairmen of the Council of People's Commissars
2 Sergey Kavtaradze
(1885–1971)
April 1922 January 1923 Communist Party of Georgia Chairmen of the Council of People's Commissars
3 Shalva Eliava - 2 Shalva Eliava
(1883–1937)
January 1923 June 1927 Communist Party of Georgia Chairmen of the Council of People's Commissars
4 No image Lavrenty Kartvelishvili
(1890–1938)
June 1927 June 1929 Communist Party of Georgia Chairmen of the Council of People's Commissars
5 Filipp Makharadze Filipp Makharadze
(1886–1941)
June 1929 January 1931 Communist Party of Georgia Chairmen of the Council of People's Commissars
6 No image Levan Sukhishvili January 1931 22 September 1931 Communist Party of Georgia Chairmen of the Council of People's Commissars
7 No image German Mgaloblishvili
(?–1937)
22 September 1931 9 July 1937 Communist Party of Georgia Chairmen of the Council of People's Commissars
8 No image Valerian Bakradze
(1901–1971)
9 July 1937 15 April 1946 Communist Party of Georgia Chairmen of the Council of People's Commissars
15 April 1946 December 1946 Chairmen of the Council of Ministers
9 No image Zakhary Chkhubianishvili
(1903–?)
December 1946 6 April 1952 Communist Party of Georgia Chairmen of the Council of Ministers
10 No image Zakhary Ketskhoveli
(1902–1970)
6 April 1952 16 April 1953 Communist Party of Georgia Chairmen of the Council of Ministers
11 No image Valerian Bakradze
(1901–1971)
16 April 1953 20 September 1953 Communist Party of Georgia Chairmen of the Council of Ministers
12 No image Givi Javakhishvili
(1912–1985)
21 September 1953 17 December 1975 Communist Party of Georgia Chairmen of the Council of Ministers
13 No image Zurab Pataridze
(1928–1982)
17 December 1975 5 June 1982 Communist Party of Georgia Chairmen of the Council of Ministers
14 No image Dmitry Kartvelishvili
(1927–)
2 July 1982 12 April 1986 Communist Party of Georgia Chairmen of the Council of Ministers
15 No image Otar Cherkezia
(1933–)
12 April 1986 29 March 1989 Communist Party of Georgia Chairmen of the Council of Ministers
16 No image Zurab Chkheidze
(1930–)
29 March 1989 14 April 1989 Communist Party of Georgia Chairmen of the Council of Ministers
17 No image Nodari Chitanava
(1935–)
14 April 1989 15 November 1990 Communist Party of Georgia Chairmen of the Council of Ministers
18 Tengiz Sigua Tengiz Sigua
(1934–)
15 November 1990 18 August 1991 Independent Chairmen of the Council of Ministers

Republic of Georgia (1991–1995)

Prime Ministers
No. Name
(Born–Died)
Picture Took Office Left Office Party
Murman Omanidze
(1938–)
(acting)
No image 18 August 1991 23 August 1991 Independent
1 Besarion Gugushvili
(1945–)
No image 23 August 1991 6 January 1992[7] Round Table — Free Georgia
2 Tengiz Sigua
(1934–)
Tengiz Sigua 6 January 1992 6 August 1993 Independent
Eduard Shevardnadze
(1928–2014)
(acting)
Eduard shevardnadze 6 August 1993 20 August 1993 Independent
3 Otar Patsatsia
(1929–)
No image 20 August 1993 5 October 1995 Independent

Georgia (1995–present)

State Ministers
No. Name
(Born–Died)
Picture Took Office Left Office Party
1 Niko Lekishvili
(1947–)
No image 8 December 1995 26 July 1998 Union of Citizens of Georgia
2 Vazha Lortkipanidze
(1949–)
No image 31 July 1998 11 May 2000 Union of Citizens of Georgia
3 Giorgi Arsenishvili
(1942–2010)
No image 11 May 2000 21 December 2001 Union of Citizens of Georgia
4 Avtandil Jorbenadze
(1951–)
No image 21 December 2001 27 November 2003 Union of Citizens of Georgia
5 Zurab Zhvania
(1963–2005)
Surab Schwania 27 November 2003 17 February 2004 United National Movement
Prime Ministers
No. Name
(Born–Died)
Picture Took Office Left Office Party
4 Zurab Zhvania
(1963–2005)
Surab Schwania 17 February 2004 3 February 2005 United National Movement
Mikheil Saakashvili
(1967–)
(acting)[8]
President of Georgia Mikheil Saakashvili in Tbilisi, March 22, 2008 3 February 2005 17 February 2005 United National Movement
5 Zurab Noghaideli
(1964–)
Zurab Nogaideli 17 February 2005 16 November 2007 United National Movement
Giorgi Baramidze
(1968–)
(acting)[9]
Giorgi baramidze 16 November 2007 22 November 2007 United National Movement
6 Lado Gurgenidze
(1970–)
Lado Gurgenidze (August 25, 2008) 22 November 2007 1 November 2008 Independent
7 Grigol Mgaloblishvili
(1973–)
Grigol Mgaloblishvili (November 20, 2008) (A) 1 November 2008 6 February 2009 Independent
8 Nika Gilauri
(1975–)
Nika Gilauri (Thailand, 21 April 2010) 6 February 2009 4 July 2012 Independent
9 Vano Merabishvili
(1968–)
Ivane Merabishvili 4 July 2012 25 October 2012 United National Movement
10 Bidzina Ivanishvili
(1956–)
Bidzina Ivanishvili 2013-07-19 25 October 2012 20 November 2013 Georgian Dream
11 Irakli Garibashvili
(1982–)
Irakli Garibashvili 2013. 2 (cropped) 20 November 2013 30 December 2015 Georgian Dream
12 Giorgi Kvirikashvili
(1967–)
Giorgi kvirikashvili 30 December 2015 13 June 2018 Georgian Dream
13 Mamuka Bakhtadze
(1982–)
Mamuka Bakhtadze 20 June 2018 Incumbent Georgian Dream

References

  1. ^ a b Article 55, Section 1–5 of the Constitution of Georgia (country) (2018)
  2. ^ a b Article 56, Section 1–5 of the Constitution of Georgia (country) (2018)
  3. ^ Article 25, Section 2 of the Constitution of Georgia (country) (2018)
  4. ^ Article 53, Section 2 of the Constitution of Georgia (country) (2018)
  5. ^ Article 72, Section 1 of the Constitution of Georgia (country) (2018)
  6. ^ Article 73, Section 1 of the Constitution of Georgia (country) (2018)
  7. ^ Prime Minister of the rebel government at Zugdidi 24 September—6 November 1993
  8. ^ Saakashvili took responsibilities as Prime minister (in Russian)
  9. ^ Acting Prime minister of Georgia criticized peacekeepers, CIS and Russia (in Russian) Archived 29 October 2013 at the Wayback Machine
Bidzina Ivanishvili

Bidzina Ivanishvili (Georgian: ბიძინა ივანიშვილი, also known as Boris Ivanishvili; born 18 February 1956) is a Georgian businessman and politician who was Prime Minister of Georgia from 25 October 2012 to 20 November 2013. He founded and led the Georgian Dream coalition, which won the 2012 parliamentary election. After the 2013 presidential election, he voluntarily resigned both his government and party positions, naming his long-time personal assistant Irakli Gharibashvili as his successor. On 26 April 2018, the incumbent chairperson of the Georgian Dream-Democratic Georgia party, PM Giorgi Kvirikashvili, announced that Ivanishvili would return as chairperson.Dual citizen of Russian Federation and Georgia, latter granted by Saakashvili, In March 2010, Ivanishvili was granted another trio French citizenship. In October 2011, he was deprived of his Georgian citizenship "according to Article 32 of the Georgian Law on Citizenship", shortly after he had announced his intention to form a political party to challenge Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili.In March 2012, Ivanishvili was ranked at number 153 in Forbes magazine's annual list of the world's billionaires with an estimated worth of $6.4 billion, making him Georgia's richest person.

Embassy of Georgia in Washington, D.C.

The Embassy of Georgia in Washington, D.C. is the diplomatic mission of the Republic of Georgia to the United States. It is located at 1824 R Street, Northwest, Washington, D.C. The Embassy was founded in 1993 after the establishment of diplomatic relations between Georgia and the United States.

The current Ambassador of Georgia to the United States is David Bakradze, appointed in November 2016.The Embassy serves as a Consulate of Georgia in Washington DC and serves the citizens of Georgia residing in the following US States: District of Columbia, Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. The Consulate General of Georgia to the United States is located in New York, NY.Bilateral Relations

Since 1993, Georgia and United States have been engaged in diplomatic relations encompassing multiple sectors.

In 2009, Georgia and United States advanced bilateral relations to a new level by signing a Strategic Partnership Agreement which deepens cooperation between the two states in multiple fields. The first meeting of the Strategic Partnership Commission, held on June 22, 2009, launched four bilateral working groups on priority areas identified in the Charter: democracy, defense and security, economic, trade and energy issues, and people-to-people and cultural exchanges.

Senior-level Georgian and American policy-makers lead yearly meetings of each working group to review commitments, update activities, and establish future objectives. Annual plenary sessions of the commission are co-chaired by Prime-Minister of Georgia and the United States Secretary of State.

Georgian Intelligence Service

The Georgian Intelligence Service (GIS) (Georgian: საქართველოს დაზვერვის სამსახური, sakartvelos dazvervis samsakhuri) is a national intelligence agency of Georgia, with its headquarters in Tbilisi. The current head of the service is Davit Sujashvili, appointed in 2013.

The GIS is directly subordinated to the Prime Minister of Georgia. It is responsible for providing national security intelligence assessment and conducting counter-intelligence duties abroad.

Giorgi Baramidze

Giorgi Baramidze (Georgian: გიორგი ბარამიძე, born January 5, 1968) is a Georgian politician who served as Vice-Prime Minister of Georgia and State Minister for Euro-Atlantic Integration from 2004 to 2012. On October 21, 2012, he was elected as a vice-speaker of the Parliament of Georgia.

Giorgi Kvirikashvili

Giorgi Kvirikashvili (Georgian: გიორგი კვირიკაშვილი; born 20 July 1967) is a Georgian politician who was Prime Minister of Georgia from 30 December 2015 to 13 June 2018. Prior to that he was Minister of Economy and Sustainable Development from 25 October 2012 until 1 September 2015, Minister of Foreign Affairs from 1 September 2015 until 30 December 2015, and Deputy Prime Minister from 26 July 2013 until 30 December 2015. Kvirikashvili has led initiatives to advance Euro-Atlantic and European integration and highlight Georgia as an attractive location for foreign investment. On 20 June 2018, Mamuka Bakhtadze, who previously served as Kvirikashvili's Minister of Finance, was approved by the Georgian Parliament to succeed Kvirikashvili in a 99-6 vote.

Givi Javakhishvili

Givi Javakhishvili (Georgian: გივი ჯავახიშვილი) (18 December 1912 – 10 November 1985) was a Georgian Politician who served as Prime Minister of Georgia from 1953 to 1975.

Government of Georgia (country)

The Government of Georgia (Georgian: საქართველოს მთავრობა, translit.: sakartvelos mtavroba) is the supreme body of executive power in Georgia that implements the domestic and foreign policies of the country. It consists of Prime Minister—the head of the government—and ministers and is accountable and responsible to the Parliament of Georgia. The current powers and responsibilities of the Government are governed by the amendments of the Constitution of Georgia passed in 2017 and 2018. From 14 May 1991 to 9 November 1996, the executive government of Georgia was referred to as the Cabinet of Ministers of the Republic of Georgia (საქართველოს რესპუბლიკის მინისტრთა კაბინეტი).The incumbent government is that led by Mamuka Bakhtadze, in office since 20 June 2018. Beyond the Prime Minister, it includes ten ministers and one state minister.

Grigol Mgaloblishvili

Grigol Mgaloblishvili (Georgian: გრიგოლ მგალობლიშვილი, pronounced [ɡriɡɔl mɡɑlɔbliʃvili]; born 7 October 1973) is a Georgian politician and diplomat who has been Georgia's Permanent Representative to NATO since 26 June 2009. He briefly served as the Prime Minister of Georgia from 1 November 2008 to 6 February 2009.

Irakli Garibashvili

Irakli Garibashvili (Georgian: ირაკლი ღარიბაშვილი, also transliterated as Gharibashvili; born June 28, 1982) was the Prime Minister of Georgia from November 20, 2013 until his resignation on December 29, 2015, and is a former business executive. Garibashvili entered politics with his long-time associate, the businessman Bidzina Ivanishvili, in October 2012. He served as Minister of Internal Affairs in the cabinet of Bidzina Ivanishvili from 2012 to 2013. Ivanishvili named Garibashvili as his successor as Prime Minister when he voluntarily stepped down in November 2013. Aged 31 at his ascension, he was the youngest person to assume the PM office. During his term, he was the second youngest state leader in the world, after Kim Jong-un.

Lado Gurgenidze

Vladimer "Lado" Gurgenidze (Georgian: ვლადიმერ [ლადო] გურგენიძე) is a Georgian career banker, business executive, and the former politician, who was the sixth Prime Minister of Georgia, from 22 November 2007 to 1 November 2008.

Mamuka Bakhtadze

Mamuka Bakhtadze (Georgian: მამუკა ბახტაძე; born 9 June 1982) is a Georgian politician who has served as the country's Prime Minister since 20 June 2018. He had previously served as Minister of Finance (2017–2018) and, prior to that, executive director of the Georgian Railway company (2013–2017).

Ministry of Defense of Georgia

The Ministry of Defense of Georgia (Georgian: საქართველოს თავდაცვის სამინისტრო, sakartvelos tavdatsvis saministro) is the Georgian government ministry in charge of the Defense Forces of Georgia and regulating activities in defence of the country from external threats, preserving territorial integrity and waging wars on behalf of Georgia. The Minister of Defence is appointed and removed from the post by the Prime Minister of Georgia. The ministry is currently headed by Levan Izoria.

Nika Gilauri

Nika Gilauri (Georgian: ნიკოლოზ [ნიკა] გილაური, pronounced [nikʼa ɡilauri]; born 14 February 1975) is a Georgian politician who was Prime Minister of Georgia from 6 February 2009 to 30 June 2012. He had served as Minister for Energy (2004–2007) and Minister for Finance (2007–2009) and First Vice Prime Minister in the Cabinet of Georgia (2008–2009).

In 2012, he was appointed as the head of the JSC Partnership Fund, a state-owned stock fund. Currently Gilauri set his advisory boutique for public sector decision makers. He is also a senior advisor at McKinsey and Co.

Niko Lekishvili

Nikoloz "Niko" Lekishvili (Georgian: ნიკოლოზ [ნიკო] ლეკიშვილი; born April 20, 1947) is a Georgian politician, former State Minister (Georgia) and Mayor of Tbilisi, member of the Parliament of Georgia.

Nikoloz

Nikoloz (Georgian: ნიკოლოზ) is a Georgian masculine given name. It is a cognate of the name Nicholas. Notable people with the name include:

Nikoloz "Tato" Baratashvili (1817–1845), Georgian poet

Nikoloz Basilashvili (born 1992), Georgian tennis player

Nikoloz Berdzenishvili (1895–1965), Georgian historian and academician

Nikoloz "Nika" Chkheidze (born 1968), Georgian footballer

Nikoloz Cholokashvili (1585–1658), Georgian Orthodox priest, politician and diplomat

Nikoloz Gelashvili (born 1985), Georgian footballer

Nikoloz "Nika" Gilauri (born 1975), Georgian politician, former Prime Minister of Georgia

Nikoloz Gruzinsky (1783-1861), Georgian prince

Nikoloz Izoria (born 1985), Georgian boxer

Nikoloz "Lasha" Janashia (1931–1982), Georgian historian and academician

Nikoloz "Nika" Janjgava (born 1970), Georgian military colonel and a military historian

Nikoloz "Niko" Lekishvili (born 1947), Georgian politician and statesman, former Prime Minister of Georgia

Nikoloz Memanishvili (born 1979), Georgian conductor, composer and cultural manager

Nikoloz Mnatobishvili (born 1992), Georgian footballer

Nikoloz "Niko" Muskhelishvili (1891–1976), Georgian-Soviet mathematician, physician and engineer

Nikoloz "Niko" Rurua (born 1968), Georgian politician

Nikoloz Shengelaia (1903-1943), Georgian film director

Nikoloz Togonidze (born 1971), Georgian footballer

Nikoloz Tskitishvili (born 1983), Georgian basketball player

Nikoloz "Nika" Vacheishvili (born 1968) Georgian art scholar and politician

Politics of Georgia (country)

Politics in Georgia involve a parliamentary representative democratic republic with a multi-party system. The President of Georgia is the ceremonial head of state and the Prime Minister of Georgia is the head of government. The President and the Government wield executive power. Legislative power is vested in both the Government and the unicameral Parliament of Georgia.After the Rose Revolution of 2003, the National Movement – Democrats dominated the party system. Georgia became a democratic republic following the first multiparty, democratic parliamentary elections of October 28, 1990. The Georgian state is highly centralized, except for the autonomous regions of Abkhazia and Adjara and the former autonomous region of South Ossetia. Abkhazia and South Ossetia, which had autonomy within the Georgian SSR during Soviet rule, unilaterally seceded from Georgia in the 1990s. While, as of 2016, the Georgian government recognizes Abkhazia as autonomous within Georgia, it does not recognize South Ossetia as having any special status.

Consideration of replacing Georgia's republic with some form of constitutional monarchy has become part of Georgian political debate since the Georgian Orthodox primate and other leading Georgians suggested the idea in 2007.

Vano Merabishvili

Ivane "Vano" Merabishvili (Georgian: ივანე "ვანო" მერაბიშვილი; born 15 April 1968) is a Georgian politician and former Prime Minister of Georgia from 4 July to 25 October 2012. A former NGO activist, he became directly involved in Georgia's politics in 1999 and emerged as one of the government's most influential members after the 2003 Rose Revolution, especially as Georgia's Minister of Internal Affairs (18 December 2004–4 July 2012).

Zurab Noghaideli

Zurab Noghaideli (Georgian: ზურაბ ნოღაიდელი) (born 22 October 1964) is a Georgian businessman and a politician who served as the Prime Minister of Georgia from February 2005 until he resigned, citing health problems, on 16 November 2007. In December 2008, Noghaideli withdrew into opposition, setting up the Movement for Fair Georgia party.

Zurab Zhvania

Zurab Zhvania (Georgian: ზურაბ ჟვანია; 9 December 1963 – 3 February 2005) was a Georgian politician, who served as Prime Minister of Georgia and Speaker of the Parliament of Georgia. Zhvania began his political career at young age, making his first political steps as a member of Green Party, in the beginning of 90s. In 1992 Zhvania was elected chairman of Eastern European Green's and was first Eastern European to serve at the post. In 1993 Zhvania made first serious steps in Georgian politics as he was elected as General Secretary of Citizen's Union. From that point Zhvania served important role in Georgian politics until his death in 2005. 1995 he became the chairman of parliament and maintained the post till his resignation in 1999, which was followed with discharge of other ministers, whom Zhvania suspected in Corruption. From 1993 till 2003 Zhvania remained in opposition fighting against Shevardandze's government. In 2003, Zhvania united with other opposition leaders, mainly Burdjanadze and Saakashvili, held non-violent protests against the government. Protests ended with resignation of Shevardnadze and election of Saakashvili as the president. Zhvania became prime minister and served the post until his death in 2005.

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