Primary school

A primary school (or elementary school in American English and often in Canadian English) is a school for children from about five to eleven years old, in which they receive primary or elementary education. It can refer to both the physical structure (buildings) and the organisation. Typically it comes after preschool, and before secondary school.

The International Standard Classification of Education considers primary education as a single phase where programmes are typically designed to provide fundamental skills in reading, writing and mathematics and to establish a solid foundation for learning. This is ISCED Level 1: Primary education or first stage of basic education. [1]

Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes
A primary school class in Japan
ZŠ Višňové
Elementary school in Višňové (Slovakia).
Empty classroom
Classroom with chairs on desks in the Netherlands

History of elementary education

During Greek and Roman times, boys were educated by their mothers until the age of seven, then according to the culture of their location and times, would start a formal education. In Sparta until twelve, it would be at a military academy building up physical fitness and combat skills, but also reading, writing and arithmetic [2] :25 while in Athens the emphasis would be on understand the laws of the polis, reading, writing, arithmetic and music with gymnastics and athletics,[2] :29,30 and learning the moral stories of Homer. Girls received all their education at home. In Rome the primary school was called the ludus; the curriculum developed over the centuries featuring the learning of both Latin and Greek. In AD 94, Quintilian published the systematic educational work, Institutio oratoria.[2] :68 He distinguished between teaching and learning, and that a child aged between 7 and 14 learned by sense experience, learns to form ideas, develops language and memory. He recommended that teachers should motivate their pupils by making the teaching interesting, rather than by corporal punishment.[2] :70 The trivium (grammar, rhetoric and logic) and quadrivium (arithmetic, geometry, astronomy and music) were legacies of the Roman curriculum. [2] :88

The medieval church and education

Jules-Alexis Muenier - La Leçon de catéchisme
The Catechism Lesson by Jules-Alexis Meunier

As the Roman influence waned the great cathedral schools were established to provide a source of choristers and clergy. Kings School, Canterbury dates from 597. The Council of Rome in 853 specified that each parish should provide elementary education: religious ritual but also reading and writing Latin.[2] :81 The purpose of education was pass on salvation not social change. The church had a monopoly on education and the feudal lords concurred and allowed their sons to be educated at the few church schools. The economy was agrarian and the children of serfs started work as soon as they were able. It was a truth that man was created by God in the image of Adam with his share of original sin and a boy was born sinful. Only the teaching of the church and the sacraments could redeem him.[2] :77,85 The parishes provide elementary education- but had no requirement to provide it to every child. The need was to produce priests, and in a stable kingdom such as that of Charlemagne, administrators with elementary writing skills in Latin and the arithmetic needed to collect taxes and administer them. Alcuin (735-804) developed teaching material that were based on the catechetical method- repeating and memorizing questions and answers, though often not understanding. These skills were also needed in the great abbeys such as Cluny. There was a divergence between the needs of town and monasteries and we see the development of parish, chantry, monastic and cathedral schools. With the entry of women into church life, convents were established and with them convent schools. Girls entered here at the age of eight and were taught Latin grammar, religious doctrine and music, and the womens arts of spinning, weaving, tapestry, painting and embroidery.[2] :84 Bede entered the monastic school at Jarrow at the age of seven and became a writer and historian. Chantry schools were the result of a charitable donations and educated the poor. Parishes had to have a school from 804, and cathedrals had to establish schools after the Lateran Council of 1179. Elementary education was mainly to teach the Latin needed for the trivium and the quadrivium that formed the basis of the secondary curriculum.[3]

Renaissance

Priscianus della Robbia OPA Florence
Priscian

While Humanism had a great change on the secondary curriculum, the primary curriculum was unaffected. [3] It was believed that by studying the works of the greats, ancients who had governed empires, one became fit to succeed in any field. Renaissance boys from the age of five learned Latin grammar using the same books as the Roman child. There were the grammars of Donatus and Priscian followed by Caesar's Commentaries and then St Jeromes Latin Vulgate[4].

Wealthy boys were educated by tutors. Others were educated in schools attached to the parishes, cathedrals or abbeys. From the 13th century, wealthy merchants endowed money for priests to 'establish as school to teach grammar'. These early grammar schools were to teach basic, or elementary grammar, to boys. No age limit was specified. Early examples in England included Lancaster Royal Grammar School, Royal Latin School, Buckingham, and Stockport Grammar School. The Reformation and the Dissolution of the Monasteries (1548) disrupted the funding of many schools. The schools petitioned the King, Edward VI, for an endowment. Examples of schools receiving endowments are King Edward VI Grammar School, Louth, King Edward VI Grammar School, Norwich and King Edward VI School, Stratford-upon-Avon, where William Shakespeare was thought to be pupil from the age of 7 to 14.

Paupers and the poor

Though the Grammar schools were set up to deliver elementary education, they did require their entrants to have certain skills. They expected their entrants to already be able to read and write in the vernacular. There was a need[5]

Educational philosophies

Het Hoogeland openluchtmuseum in Warffum, oud klaslokaal
Classroom from 1910 in a late 19 century elementary school, Hoogeland openluchtmuseum.

Certain movements in education had a relevance in all of Europe and its diverging colonies. The Americans were interested in the thoughts of Pestalozzi, Joseph Lancaster, Owen[2] :208 and the Prussian schools.[2] :4

Levels of education

First 'Early levels' of the ISCED 2011 levels of education and comparison with ISCED 1997[6]
Level ISCED 2011 Description Corresponding ISCED 1997 level
0 Early childhood Education (01 Early childhood educational development) Education designed to support early development in preparation for participation in school and society. Programmes designed for children below the age of 3. None
0 Early childhood Education (02 Pre-primary education) Education designed to support early development in preparation for participation in school and society. Programmes designed for children from age 3 to the start of primary education. Level 0: Pre-primary education.
1 Primary education Programmes typically designed to provide students with fundamental skills in reading, writing and mathematics and to establish a solid foundation for learning. Level 1: Primary education or first stage of basic education.
2 Lower secondary education First stage of secondary education building on primary education, typically with a more subject-oriented curriculum. Level 2: Lower secondary education or second stage of basic education
3 Upper secondary education Second/final stage of secondary education preparing for tertiary education or providing skills relevant to employment. Usually with an increased range of subject options and streams. Level 3: Upper secondary education
4 Post-secondary non-tertiary education Programmes providing learning experiences that build on secondary education and prepare for labour market entry or tertiary education. The content is broader than secondary but not as complex as tertiary education. Level 4: Post-secondary non-tertiary education
5 Short-cycle tertiary education Short first tertiary programmes that are typically practically based, occupationally specific and prepare for labour market entry. These programmes may also provide a pathway to other tertiary programmes. Level 5B: First stage of tertiary education: typically shorter, more practical/technical/occupationally specific programmes leading to professional qualifications.

Terminology: descriptions of cohorts

Within the English speaking world, there are three widely used systems to describe the age of the child. The first is the 'equivalent ages', then countries that base their education systems on the 'English model' use one of two methods to identify the year group, while countries that base their systems on the 'American K-12 model' refer to their year groups as 'grades'. This terminology extends into research literature. Below is a convenient comparison [7]

Equivalent ages 4-5 5-6 6-7 7-8 8-9 9-10 10-11
U.S. (grades) Pre-K K 1 2 3 4 5
England (forms) Reception Infants Top infants Junior 1 Junior 2 Junior 3 Junior 4
England (year) R 1 2 3 4 5 6
England (keystage) KS1 KS1 KS1 KS2 KS2 KS2 KS2
ISCED level 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 [7]
Equivalent ages 11-12 12-13 13-14 14-15 15-16 16-17 17-18
U.S. (grades) 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
U.S. (nicknames) Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior
England (forms) First Second Third Fourth Fifth Lower Sixth Upper Sixth
England (year) 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
England (keystage) KS3 KS3 KS3 KS4 KS4 KS5 KS5
ISCED level 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 [7]

Primary schools

Orbe - Chantemerle - salle de classe 1
A current classroom for 6-7 year olds in Switzerland

In most parts of the world, primary education is the first stage of compulsory education, and is normally available without charge, but may also be offered by fee-paying independent schools. The term grade school is sometimes used in the USA, although this term may refer to both primary education and secondary education.

The term primary school is derived from the French école primaire, which was first used in an English text in 1802.[8] In the United Kingdom, "elementary education" was taught in "elementary schools" until 1944, when free elementary education was proposed for students over 11: there were to be primary elementary schools and secondary elementary schools;[a] these became known as primary schools and secondary schools.

  • Primary school is the preferred term in the United Kingdom, Ireland and many Commonwealth nations, and in most publications of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).[10]
  • Elementary school is still preferred in some countries, especially in the United States and Canada.

In some parts of the United States, "primary school" refers to a school covering Kindergarten through to second grade or third grade (K-2 or 3); the "elementary school" includes grade three through five or grades four to six.

Elementary schools

Though often used as a synonym, "elementary school" has specific meanings in different locations.

Theoretical framework of primary school design

School building design does not happen in isolation. The building (or school campus) needs to accommodate:

  • Curriculum content
  • Teaching methods
  • Costs
  • Education within the political framework
  • Use of school building (also in the community setting)
  • Constraints imposed by the site
  • Design philosophy

Each country will have a different education system and priorities. [17] Schools need to accommodate students, staff, storage, mechanical and electrical systems, storage, support staff, ancillary staff and administration. The number of rooms required can be determined from the predicted roll of the school and the area needed.

According to standards used in the United Kingdom, a general classroom for 30 reception class or infant (Keystage 1) students needs to be 62 m², or 55 m² for juniors. (Keystage 2). [18] Examples are given on how this can be configured for a 210 place primary with attached 26 place nursery.[19] and two storey 420 place (2 form entry) primary school with attached 26 place nursery.[20]

Building design specifications

First school
The first taxpayer-funded public school in the United States was in Dedham
Orbe - Chantemerle - salle des maîtres
Teachers facilities in Switzerland
ClassroomLibrary
A classroom library in the US

The building providing the education has to fulfil the needs of: The students, the teachers, the non-teaching support staff, the administrators and the community. It has to meet general government building guidelines, health requirements, minimal functional requirements for classrooms, toilets and showers, electricity and services, preparation and storage of textbooks and basic teaching aids. [21] An optimum school will meet the minimum conditions and will have:

  • adequately sized classrooms- where 60 m² in considered optimum but 80m² for the reception class;
  • specialised teaching spaces;
  • a staff preparation room;
  • staff welfare facilities
  • an administration block;
  • multipurpose classrooms;
  • student toilet facilities;
  • a general purpose school hall;
  • adequate equipment;
  • storage;
  • a library or library stocks that are regularly renewed; and
  • computer rooms or media centres.
  • counselling, sick and medical examination rooms,[21]

Government accountants having read the advice then publish minimum guidelines on schools. These enable environmental modelling and establishing building costs. Future design plans are audited to ensure that these standards are met but not exceeded. Government ministries continue to press for the 'minimum' space and cost standards to be reduced.

The UK government published this downwardly revised space formula for primary schools in 2014. It said the floor area should be 350m² + 4.1m²/pupil place. The external finishes were to be downgraded to meet a build cost of £1113/m². [22]

Governance and funding

There are three main ways of funding a school: it can funded by the state through general taxation, it can be funded by a pressure group such as the mosque or the church, it can be funded by a charity or it can be funded by contributions from the parents or a combination of these methods. Day to day oversight of the school can through a board of governors,the pressure group or by the owner.

The United Kingdom allowed most elementary education to be delivered in church schools whereas in France this was illegal as there is strict separation of church and state.

Accountability

This can be through informal assessment by the staff and governors such as in Finnland, or by a state run testing regime such as Ofsted in the United Kingdom.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ secondary elementary school: A term already used by London County Council from 1921 to describe some 11-14 schools,[9] and term still in use in Florida, Ohio and Brazil.

References

  1. ^ Annex III in the ISCED 2011 English.pdf Navigate to International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED)
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Gerald L. Gutek (14 December 1994). A History of the Western Educational Experience: Second Edition. Waveland Press. p. 203. ISBN 978-1-4786-3010-4. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  3. ^ a b Black, Robert (2001). "Humanism and Education in Medieval and Renaissance Italy: Tradition and Innovation in Latin Schools from the Twelfth to the Fifteenth Century": 489. ISSN 1530-9169.
  4. ^ Bertlett, Kenneth (15 December 2016). "The Italian Renaissance - The Education and Learning During the Renaissance". The Great Courses Daily. University of Toronto. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  5. ^ The Education of the Working Classes to 1870 | British History Online. London. 1969. p. 240. Retrieved 22 April 2019.
  6. ^ "International Standard Classification of Education 2011" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 15 December 2017. Retrieved 25 December 2017.
  7. ^ a b c Ward, Ken. "British and American Systems (Grades)". trans4mind.com. Archived from the original on 31 March 2017. Retrieved 30 March 2017.
  8. ^ "Online Etymology Dictionary".
  9. ^ "Hadow Report (1926)". www.educationengland.org.uk.
  10. ^ Primary school. In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved on 12 June 2007, from Encyclopædia Britannica Online: http://search.eb.com/eb/article-9061377
  11. ^ "Historical Timeline of Public Education in the US". Race Forward. 13 April 2006. Retrieved 8 February 2018.
  12. ^ "Digest of Education Statistics, 2001" (PDF). National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  13. ^ Snyder, Thomas D.; Hoffman, Charlene M. (2001). Digest of Education Statistics 2001 (pdf). Institute of Education Sciences, Washington: National Center for Education Statistics. p. 7, fig. 1. Retrieved 19 August 2017.
  14. ^ "Secretary Riley Reignites the Math Wars". hoover.org. Retrieved 28 March 2018.
  15. ^ ESEA. "No Child Left Behind Act". www.k12.wa.us. Retrieved 28 March 2018.
  16. ^ "The Establishment of Elementary Schools and Attendance". JAPAN'S MODERN EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM. Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  17. ^ Liew Kok-Pun, Michael (1981). "Design of secondary schools:Singapore a case study" (PDF). Educational Building reports. Voume 17: UNESCO. p. 37. Archived (PDF) from the original on 4 April 2017. Retrieved 3 April 2017.
  18. ^ "Mainstream schools: area guidelines". GOV.UK. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  19. ^ "Baseline design: 210 place primary school with a 26 place nursery". GOV.UK. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  20. ^ "Baseline design: 420 place primary school with 26 place nursery". GOV.UK. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  21. ^ a b "Guidelines relating to planning for public school infrastructure". Department of Basic Education, Republic of South Africa. 2012. Archived from the original on 7 September 2015. Retrieved 3 April 2017.
  22. ^ "Baseline designs for schools: guidance - GOV.UK". www.gov.uk. Education Funding Agency. 11 March 2014. Archived from the original on 4 April 2017. Retrieved 3 April 2017.

External links

Barnsley

Barnsley () is a town in South Yorkshire, England, located halfway between Leeds and Sheffield. Historically in the West Riding of Yorkshire, the town centre lies on the west bank of the Dearne Valley. Barnsley is surrounded by several smaller settlements which together form the Metropolitan Borough of Barnsley, of which Barnsley is the largest and its administrative centre. At the 2011 Census, Barnsley had a population of 91,297.Barnsley is a former industrial town centred on linen in its former years and coal mining, glassmaking and textiles. The industries declined in the 20th century. Barnsley's culture is rooted in its industrial heritage and it has a tradition of brass bands, originally created as social clubs by its mining communities. It is also home of the Barnsley chop.

The town is accessed from junctions 36, 37 and 38 of the M1 motorway and has a railway station on the Hallam and Penistone Lines. Barnsley F.C. is the local football club, which has competed in the second tier of British football for most of its history. Barnsley F.C. also won the FA Cup in 1912.

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Belfast suffered greatly in the Troubles: in the 1970s and 1980s it was one of the world's most dangerous cities. However, a survey conducted by a finance company and published in 2016 rated the city as one of the safest within the United Kingdom. Throughout the 21st century, the city has seen a sustained period of calm, free from the intense political violence of former years, and has benefitted from substantial economic and commercial growth. Belfast remains a centre for industry, as well as for the arts, higher education, business, and law, and is the economic engine of Northern Ireland. Belfast is still a major port, with commercial and industrial docks, including the Harland and Wolff shipyard, dominating the Belfast Lough shoreline. It is served by two airports: George Best Belfast City Airport and Belfast International Airport 15 miles (24 km) west of the city. The Globalization and World Cities Research Network (GaWC) listed Belfast as a Gamma global city in 2018.

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Bulawayo is, at least historically, the principal industrial centre of Zimbabwe; its factories produce cars and car products, building materials, electronic products, textiles, furniture, and food products. Bulawayo is also the hub of Zimbabwe's rail network and the headquarters of the National Railways of Zimbabwe.In recent years, the city's economy has struggled as many factories either closed or moved operations to Harare. Still, Bulawayo has the highest Human Development Index in the country, at .649 as of 2017.

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County Down

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In the east of the county is Strangford Lough and the Ards Peninsula. The largest town is Bangor, on the northeast coast. Three other large towns and cities are on its border: Newry lies on the western border with County Armagh, while Lisburn and Belfast lie on the northern border with County Antrim. Down contains both the southernmost point of Northern Ireland (Cranfield Point) and the easternmost point of Ireland (Burr Point).

It was one of two counties of Northern Ireland to have a Protestant majority at the 2001 census. The other Protestant majority County is County Antrim to the North.

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Primary education

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Swansea (; Welsh: Abertawe [abɛrˈtawɛ]), is a coastal city and county, officially known as the City and County of Swansea (Welsh: Dinas a Sir Abertawe) in Wales. Swansea lies within the historic county boundaries of Glamorgan and the ancient Welsh commote of Gŵyr on the southwest coast. The county area includes Swansea Bay (Welsh: Bae Abertawe) and the Gower Peninsula. Swansea is the second largest city in Wales and the twenty-fifth largest city in the United Kingdom. According to its local council, the City and County of Swansea had a population of 241,300 in 2014. The last official census stated that the city, metropolitan and urban areas combined concluded to be a total of 462,000 in 2011; the second most populous local authority area in Wales after Cardiff.During the 19th-century industrial heyday, Swansea was the key centre of the copper-smelting industry, earning the nickname Copperopolis.

Trafford

Trafford is a metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester, England, with an estimated population of 235,493 in 2017. It covers 41 square miles (106 km2) and includes the areas of Old Trafford, Stretford, Urmston, Altrincham, Partington and Sale. The borough was formed in 1974 as a merger of the metropolitan boroughs of Altrincham, Sale, and Stretford, the urban districts of Bowdon, Hale and Urmston and part of Bucklow Rural District. The River Mersey flows through the borough, separating North Trafford from South Trafford, and the historic counties of Lancashire and Cheshire.

There is evidence of Neolithic, Bronze Age, and Roman activity in the area, two castles – one of them a Scheduled Ancient Monument – and over 200 listed buildings. In the late 19th century, the population rapidly expanded with the arrival of the railway. Trafford is the home of Altrincham Football Club, Trafford Football Club, Manchester United F.C., The Trafford Centre and Lancashire County Cricket Club and since 2002 the Imperial War Museum North.

Trafford has a strong economy with low levels of unemployment and contains both Trafford Park industrial estate and the Trafford Centre, a large out-of-town shopping centre. Apart from the City of Manchester, Trafford is the only borough in Greater Manchester to be above the national average for weekly income. Socially, the area includes both working class and middle class areas like Bowdon and Hale. In Parliament, Trafford is represented by three constituencies: Stretford and Urmston; Altrincham and Sale West; and Wythenshawe and Sale East, which mainly covers neighbouring Manchester.

Westminster

Westminster is an area in central London within the City of Westminster, part of the West End, on the north bank of the River Thames. Westminster's concentration of visitor attractions and historic landmarks, one of the highest in London, includes the Palace of Westminster, Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey and Westminster Cathedral.

Historically the area lay within St Margaret's parish, City & Liberty of Westminster, Middlesex.

The name Westminster (Old English: Westmynstre) originated from the informal description of the abbey church and royal peculiar of St Peter's (Westminster Abbey), literally West of the City of London (indeed, until the Reformation there was a reference to the 'East Minster' at Minories (Holy Trinity Priory, Aldgate) east of the City). The abbey was part of the royal palace that had been created here by Edward the Confessor. It has been the home of the permanent institutions of England's government continuously since about 1200 (High Middle Ages' Plantagenet times), and from 1707 the British Government — formally titled Her Majesty's Government.

In a government context, Westminster often refers to the Parliament of the United Kingdom, located in the UNESCO World Heritage Palace of Westminster — also known as the Houses of Parliament. The closest tube stations are Westminster and St James's Park, on the Jubilee, Circle, and District lines.

The area is the centre of Her Majesty's Government, with Parliament in the Palace of Westminster and most of the major Government ministries known as Whitehall, itself the site of the royal palace that replaced that at Westminster.

Within the area is Westminster School, a major public school which grew out of the Abbey, and the University of Westminster, attended by over 20,000 students. Bounding Westminster to the north is Green Park, a Royal Park of London.

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