Prentice Hall

Prentice Hall is a major educational publisher owned by Pearson plc. Prentice Hall publishes print and digital content for the 6–12 and higher-education market. Prentice Hall distributes its technical titles through the Safari Books Online e-reference service.

Prentice Hall
Prentice Hall (logo)
Parent companyPearson Education
Founded1913
FounderCharles Gerstenberg and Richard Ettinger
Country of originUnited States
Headquarters locationUpper Saddle River, New Jersey
Publication typesBooks
Official websiteprenticehall.com

History

On October 13, 1913, law professor Charles Gerstenberg and his student Richard Ettinger founded Prentice Hall. Gerstenberg and Ettinger took their mothers' maiden names—Prentice and Hall—to name their new company.[1]

Prentice Hall was acquired by Gulf+Western in 1984, and became part of that company's publishing division Simon & Schuster. Publication of trade books ended in 1991[2]. Simon & Schuster's educational division, including Prentice Hall, was sold to Pearson by G+W successor Viacom in 1998.

There were two or more authors that had contracts with Prentice Hall in the 1991 to 1995 period. Their books turned up missing when Pearson purchased the company. One book 'The Roof Builder's Handbook' is still being sold in 2018 for as much as $230 per new copy, but the author William C. McElroy was told by Pearson that all new books were either destroyed or went missing in 1995. Some 2,385 copies are missing. [3]

Notable titles

Prentice Hall is the publisher of Magruder's American Government as well as Biology by Ken Miller and Joe Levine. Their artificial intelligence series includes Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach by Stuart J. Russell and Peter Norvig and ANSI Common Lisp by Paul Graham. They also published the well-known computer programming book The C Programming Language by Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie and Operating Systems: Design and Implementation by Andrew S. Tanenbaum. Other titles include Dennis Nolan's Big Pig (1976), Monster Bubbles: A Counting Book (1976), Alphabrutes (1977), Wizard McBean and his Flying Machine (1977), Witch Bazooza (1979), Llama Beans (1979, with author Charles Keller), and The Joy of Chickens (1981).

In "personal computer" history

A Prentice Hall subsidiary, Reston Publishing, was in the foreground of technical-book publishing when microcomputers were first becoming available. It was still unclear who would be buying and using "personal computers," and the scarcity of useful software and instruction created a publishing market niche whose target audience yet had to be defined. In the spirit of the pioneers who made PCs possible, Reston Publishing's editors addressed non-technical users with the reassuring, and mildly experimental, Computer Anatomy for Beginners by Marlin Ouverson of People's Computer Company. They followed with a collection of books that was generally by and for programmers, building a stalwart list of titles relied on by many in the first generation of microcomputers users.

See also

References

  1. ^ "About Pearson Prentice Hall". Archived from the original on May 3, 2007. Retrieved 2007-05-23.
  2. ^ Cohen, Roger (1991-07-10). "THE MEDIA BUSINESS; Simon & Schuster to Absorb Prentice Hall Press Division". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  3. ^ William (Bill) C. McElroy author of the Roof Builder's Handbook, ISBN 0-13-781816-5

External links

Anguish Languish

The Anguish Languish is an ersatz language constructed from similar-sounding English language words. It was created by Howard L. Chace circa 1940, and he later collected his stories and poems in the book Anguish Languish (Prentice-Hall, 1956). It is not really a language but rather humorous homophonic transformation. Example: "Ladle Rat Rotten Hut" means "Little Red Riding Hood" and "Mural: Yonder nor sorghum stenches shut ladle gulls stopper torque wet strainers" means: Moral: Under no circumstances should little girls stop to talk with strangers.Chace offered this description: "The Anguish Languish consists only of the purest of English words, and its chief raison d'être is to demonstrate the marvelous versatility of a language in which almost anything can, if necessary, be made to mean something else." His story "Ladle Rat Rotten Hut" is "Little Red Riding Hood" re-written with similar-sounding words substituting for the original folk tale. A professor of French, Chace wrote "Ladle Rat Rotten Hut" in 1940 to demonstrate that the intonation of spoken English is almost as important to the meaning as the words themselves. It was first published in Gene Sherman's "Cityside" column in the Los Angeles Times in 1953, reprinted in the San Francisco Chronicle and in the first issue of Sports Illustrated in 1954.

Appleton-Century-Crofts

Appleton-Century-Crofts, Inc. was a division of the Meredith Publishing Company. It is a result of the merger of Appleton-Century Company with F.S. Crofts Co. in 1948. Prior to that The Century Company had merged with D. Appleton & Company in 1933.

The Century Company and its subsequent incarnations published the New Century Dictionary.

Eventually Meredith sold the majority of the company and the Appleton name to Prentice-Hall in 1973. Part of the company became part of Hawthorn Books and New Win Publishing.

Chemical compound

A chemical compound is a chemical substance composed of many identical molecules (or molecular entities) composed of atoms from more than one element held together by chemical bonds. A chemical element bonded to an identical chemical element is not a chemical compound since only one element, not two different elements, is involved.

There are four types of compounds, depending on how the constituent atoms are held together:

molecules held together by covalent bonds

ionic compounds held together by ionic bonds

intermetallic compounds held together by metallic bonds

certain complexes held together by coordinate covalent bonds.A chemical formula is a way of expressing information about the proportions of atoms that constitute a particular chemical compound, using the standard abbreviations for the chemical elements, and subscripts to indicate the number of atoms involved. For example, water is composed of two hydrogen atoms bonded to one oxygen atom: the chemical formula is H2O. Many chemical compounds have a unique numerical identifier assigned by the Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS): its CAS number.

A compound can be converted to a different chemical composition by interaction with a second chemical compound via a chemical reaction. In this process, bonds between atoms are broken in both of the interacting compounds, and then bonds are reformed so that new associations are made between atoms.

Digital signal processing

Digital signal processing (DSP) is the use of digital processing, such as by computers or more specialized digital signal processors, to perform a wide variety of signal processing operations. The signals processed in this manner are a sequence of numbers that represent samples of a continuous variable in a domain such as time, space, or frequency.

Digital signal processing and analog signal processing are subfields of signal processing. DSP applications include audio and speech processing, sonar, radar and other sensor array processing, spectral density estimation, statistical signal processing, digital image processing, signal processing for telecommunications, control systems, biomedical engineering, seismology, among others.

DSP can involve linear or nonlinear operations. Nonlinear signal processing is closely related to nonlinear system identification and can be implemented in the time, frequency, and spatio-temporal domains.

The application of digital computation to signal processing allows for many advantages over analog processing in many applications, such as error detection and correction in transmission as well as data compression. DSP is applicable to both streaming data and static (stored) data.

Edward Yourdon

Edward Nash Yourdon (April 30, 1944 – January 20, 2016) was an American software engineer, computer consultant, author and lecturer, and software engineering methodology pioneer. He was one of the lead developers of the structured analysis techniques of the 1970s and a co-developer of both the Yourdon/Whitehead method for object-oriented analysis/design in the late 1980s and the Coad/Yourdon methodology for object-oriented analysis/design in the 1990s.

Equivalence class

In mathematics, when the elements of some set S have a notion of equivalence (formalized as an equivalence relation) defined on them, then one may naturally split the set S into equivalence classes. These equivalence classes are constructed so that elements a and b belong to the same equivalence class if and only if a and b are equivalent.

Formally, given a set S and an equivalence relation ~ on S, the equivalence class of an element a in S is the set

of elements which are equivalent to a. It may be proven from the defining properties of "equivalence relations" that the equivalence classes form a partition of S. This partition – the set of equivalence classes – is sometimes called the quotient set or the quotient space of S by ~ and is denoted by S / ~.

When the set S has some structure (such as a group operation or a topology) and the equivalence relation ~ is defined in a manner suitably compatible with this structure, then the quotient set often inherits a similar structure from its parent set. Examples include quotient spaces in linear algebra, quotient spaces in topology, quotient groups, homogeneous spaces, quotient rings, quotient monoids, and quotient categories.

Exoticism

Exoticism (from 'exotic') is a trend in European art and design, whereby artists became fascinated with ideas and styles from distant regions, and drew inspiration from them. This often involved surrounding foreign cultures with mystique and fantasy which owed more to European culture than to the exotic cultures themselves: this process of glamorisation and stereotyping is called 'exoticization'.

FT Press

Financial Times Press in the United States and Financial Times Publishing in the United Kingdom are the book publishing imprints related to the Financial Times newspaper. The book imprints and the newspaper are owned by Pearson plc, a global publishing company. FT Press/Publishing creates books in the areas of General Business, Finance and Investing, Sales and Marketing, Leadership, Management and Strategy, Human Resources, and Global Business. FT Press is also the publishing partner for Wharton School Publishing.

FTPress.com is one of three websites of the InformIT Network. This site features free articles, blogs, and podcasts on business topics, as well as a bookstore carrying all FT Press and Wharton School Publishing titles in print and electronic formats. FT Press and Wharton School Publishing books are also available in searchable online format from Safari Books Online.

Fremont culture

The Fremont culture or Fremont people is a pre-Columbian archaeological culture which received its name from the Fremont River in the U.S. state of Utah, where the culture's sites were discovered by local indigenous peoples like the Navajo and Ute. In Navajo culture, the pictographs are credited to people who lived before the flood. The Fremont River itself is named for John Charles Frémont, an American explorer. It inhabited sites in what is now Utah and parts of Nevada, Idaho and Colorado from AD 1 to 1301 (2,000-700 years ago). It was adjacent to, roughly contemporaneous with, but distinctly different from the Ancestral Pueblo peoples located to their south.

LabVIEW

Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW) is a system-design platform and development environment for a visual programming language from National Instruments.

The graphical language is named "G"; not to be confused with G-code. Originally released for the Apple Macintosh in 1986, LabVIEW is commonly used for data acquisition, instrument control, and industrial automation on a variety of operating systems (OSs), including Microsoft Windows, various versions of Unix, Linux, and macOS.

The latest versions of LabVIEW are LabVIEW 2018 and LabVIEW NXG 3.0, released in November 2018.

Open Systems Interconnection

The Open Systems Interconnection model (OSI model) is a conceptual model that characterizes and standardizes the communication functions of a telecommunication or computing system without regard to its underlying internal structure and technology. Its goal is the interoperability of diverse communication systems with standard protocols. The model partitions a communication system into abstraction layers. The original version of the model defined seven layers.

Peachpit

Peachpit is a publisher of books focused on graphic design, web design, and development. Peachpit's parent company is Pearson Education, which owns additional educational media brands including Addison-Wesley, Prentice Hall, and New Riders.Founded in 1986, Peachpit publishes the Visual QuickStart Guide, Visual QuickPro Guide, and Classroom in a Book series, in addition to the design imprint New Riders and its Voices That Matter series. Peachpit is the official publishing partner for Adobe Systems, Lynda.com, Apple Certified at Apple Inc, and other tech corporations.

Pearson Education

Pearson Education is a British-owned education publishing and assessment service to schools and corporations, as well as directly to students. Pearson owns educational media brands including Addison–Wesley, Peachpit, Prentice Hall, eCollege, Longman, Scott Foresman, and others.

Pearson is part of Pearson plc, which formerly owned the Financial Times. It was created in July 1998 when Pearson plc purchased the education division of Simon & Schuster from Viacom and merged it with its own education division, Addison-Wesley Longman, to form Pearson Education. Pearson Education was rebranded to Pearson in 2011 and split into an International and a North American division.

Although Pearson generates approximately 60 percent of its sales in North America, it operates in more than 70 countries.

Pearson International is headquartered in London, and maintains offices across Europe, Asia and South America. Its online chat support is based in the Philippines.

Pearson North America is headquartered at 330 Hudson in New York City, New York. It previously was located in Upper Saddle River, New Jersey.Pearson Italia SpA, also known as Pearson Paravia Bruno Mondadori, was created through the purchase of PBM Editori, which was in turn a merge of Paravia (based in Turin) and Bruno Mondadori (based in Milan).

Seth Material

The Seth Material is a collection of writing dictated by Jane Roberts to her husband from late 1963 until her death in 1984. Roberts claimed the words were spoken by a discarnate entity named Seth. The material is regarded as one of the cornerstones of New Age philosophy, and the most influential channelled text of the post-World War II "New Age" movement, other than the Edgar Cayce books and A Course in Miracles. Jon Klimo writes that the Seth books were instrumental in bringing the idea of channeling to a broad public audience.Catherine L. Albanese said in the 1970s that the Seth Material launched an era of nationwide awareness of the channeling trend and contributed to the self-identity of an emergent New Age movement. Study groups formed in the United States to work with the Seth Material. and now are found around the world, as well as numerous websites and online groups, including in other languages as various titles have been translated into Chinese, Spanish, German, French, Dutch and Arabic.

John P. Newport, in his study of the influence of New Age beliefs, described the central focus of the Seth Material as the idea that each individual creates his or her own reality, a foundational concept of the New Age movement first articulated in the Seth Material.

Signal processing

Signal processing is a subfield of mathematics, information and electrical engineering that concerns the analysis, synthesis, and modification of signals, which are broadly defined as functions conveying "information about the behavior or attributes of some phenomenon", such as sound, images, and biological measurements. For example, signal processing techniques are used to improve signal transmission fidelity, storage efficiency, and subjective quality, and to emphasize or detect components of interest in a measured signal.

Simon Haykin

Simon Haykin is an electrical engineer, noted for his pioneering work in Adaptive Signal Processing with emphasis on applications in radar and communications. He is currently a Distinguished University Professor at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

He received his B.Sc. (First-class Honours), Ph.D., and D.Sc., all in Electrical Engineering from the University of Birmingham, England. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He is the recipient of the Henry Booker Gold Medal from URSI, 2002, the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Technical Sciences from ETH Zurich, Switzerland, 1999, and many other medals and prizes.

In the mid-1980s, he shifted the thrust of his research effort in the direction of Neural Computation, which was re-emerging at that time. All along, he had the vision of revisiting the fields of radar and communications from a brand new perspective. That vision became a reality in the early years of this century with the publication of two seminal journal papers:

“Cognitive Radio: Brain-empowered Wireless communications”, which appeared in IEEE J. Selected Areas in Communications, Feb. 2005.

“Cognitive Radar: A Way of the Future”, which appeared in the IEEE J. Signal Processing, Feb. 2006.

Cognitive Radio and Cognitive Radar are two important parts of a much wider and integrative field: Cognitive Dynamic Systems, research into which has become his passion.

Thomas Erl

Thomas Erl (born 1967) is a Canadian author, and public speaker known for major contributions to the field of service-oriented architecture. Author of eight books on Service Orientation, Erl defined eight widely accepted principles of service orientation.

Vic Roschkov Sr.

Vic Roschkov Sr. is a Canadian editorial cartoonist and illustrator, now living in London, Ontario, Canada.

Born in Kiev in the Soviet Ukraine, he moved with his family to London, Ontario, at an early age and later began his career in journalism at the Windsor Star in the early 1970s. Roschkov subsequently moved to the Toronto Star where he won the prestigious National Newspaper Award for cartooning in 1980—the first time that he'd submitted an editorial cartoon for consideration.

Roschkov later worked for the Edmonton Sun.

Roschkov has had a selection of his cartoons published by Prentice-Hall and for many years was staff cartoonist at the Edmonton Sun. Numerous Roschkov editorial cartoons have been acquired by the National Archives of Canada and are now part of its permanent collection in Ottawa, Ontario.

Vic Roschkov Sr. has two sons: Vic, is also a notable artist living in London, Ontario and Tom, a musician who lives in Edmonton

Wolt Fabrycky

Wolter Joseph Fabrycky (born 1932) is an American systems engineer, Lawrence Professor Emeritus of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Virginia Tech, and Principal of Academic Applications International.

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