Premier of the People's Republic of China

The Premier of the State Council of the People's Republic of China, sometimes also referred to informally as the "Prime Minister", is the Leader of the State Council of China (a.k.a. the Central People's Government), who is the head of government and holds the highest rank (Level 1) in the Civil Service. This position replaces Premier of the Government Administration Council of the Central People's Government (Chinese: 中央人民政府政务院总理, exist from 1949 to 1954)

The Premier is formally approved by the National People's Congress upon the nomination of the President. In practice, the candidate is chosen within the Communist Party of China through the same process that determines the composition of the Politburo Standing Committee. Both the President and the Premier are selected once every five years. The premier is limited to two terms, but the president is not. The Premier has always been a member of the powerful Politburo Standing Committee of the Communist Party of China.

The current Premier is Li Keqiang, who took office on 15 March 2013. He succeeded Wen Jiabao.

Premier of the
State Council of the
People's Republic of China
中华人民共和国国务院总理
Zhōnghuá Rénmín Gònghéguó
Guówùyuàn Zǒnglǐ
National Emblem of the People's Republic of China (2)
Li Keqiang-19052015
Incumbent
Li Keqiang

since 15 March 2013
StyleMr. Premier (总理)
(formal)
His Excellency (阁下)
(in international correspondence)
TypeHead of the State Council
StatusHead of Government
Member ofCentral Committee
Politburo Standing Committee
National Security Commission
State Council (Cabinet)
Plenary Meeting of the State Council
Executive Meeting of the State Council
Reports toNational People's Congress and its Standing Committee
ResidenceZhongnanhai
SeatRegent Palace, Zhongnanhai, Beijing
NominatorPresident (1982–present)
the Party Central Committee
(1975–1982, president abolished)
AppointerPresident, according to the decision of the National People's Congress
Term lengthFive years
renewable once
Constituting instrumentConstitution of the People's Republic of China
PrecursorPremier of the Government Administration Council of the Central People's Government
Inaugural holderZhou Enlai[note 1]
Formation27 September 1954 (State Council of the PRC)
1 October 1949 (Government Administration Council of the Central People's Government)
Unofficial namesPrime Minister of China
DeputyVice Premier
State Councillor
WebsiteState Council
Premier of the State Council of the People's Republic of China
Simplified Chinese中华人民共和国国务院总理
Traditional Chinese中華人民共和國國務院總理
Literal meaningChinese People Republic State Affairs Court General Manager
Alternative Chinese name
Simplified Chinese国务院总理
Traditional Chinese國務院總理
Literal meaningState Affairs Court General Manager

Powers and duties

The Premier is the highest administrative position in the Government of the People's Republic of China. The Premier is responsible for organizing and administering the Chinese civil bureaucracy. For example, the Premier is tasked with planning and implementing national economic, social development and the state budget.[1] This includes overseeing the various ministries, departments, commissions and statutory agencies and announcing their candidacies to the National People's Congress for Vice-Premiers, State Councillors and ministerial offices. The Premier's powers and responsibilities are codified into the constitution unlike the Prime Minister from the Westminster system as by convention or traditions.[1]

The Premier does not have command authority over the People's Liberation Army, but the Premier is the head of the National Defense Mobilization Commission of China and deputy head of the National Security Commission which are departments of the armed forces. Since the 1980s, there has been a division of responsibilities between the Premier and the General Secretary of the Communist Party wherein the Premier is responsible for the technical details of implementing government policy while the General Secretary gathers the political support necessary for government policy.

In 1989, then Premier Li Peng, in cooperation with the then Chairman of the Central Military Commission Deng Xiaoping, was able to use the office of the Premier to declare war against Beijing and order the military crackdown of the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989.

The Premier has been supported by four Vice-Premiers since Deng Xiaoping's reform in 1983. The First-ranked Vice Premier will act in the premier's capacity in their absence.

List of premiers

Cropped ZhouAndDeng

1st — Zhou Enlai
(served: 1949–1976)

Hua Guofeng-1

2nd — Hua Guofeng
(served: 1976–1980)

Zhao Ziyang (1985)

3rd — Zhao Ziyang
(served: 1980–1987)

Lipeng

4th — Li Peng
(served: 1987–1998)

Prem. Rongji at a Press Conference (1999) (cropped)

5th — Zhu Rongji
(served: 1998–2003)

Wen Jiabao (Cropped)

6th — Wen Jiabao
(served: 2003–2013)

Li Keqiang (cropped)

7th — Li Keqiang
(served: 2013–present)

Living former premiers

As of August 2019, there are two living former premiers:

Premier Term of office Date of birth
Zhu Rongji 1998–2003 23 October 1928 (age 90)
Wen Jiabao 2003–2013 15 September 1942 (age 76)

See also

Notes

  1. ^ as the only Premier of the Government Administration Council (1949–1954) and also the first Premier (1954–1976) of the State Council.

References

  1. ^ a b http://english.people.com.cn/constitution/constitution.html, Section 3, Article 88 and Article 89.

External links

1954 in China

Events in the year 1954 in China.

1959 in China

Events in the year 1959 in China. The country had an estimated population of 665 million people.

1962 in China

Events from the year 1962 in China.

1967 in China

Events from the year 1967 in China.

1969 in China

Events from the year 1969 in China.

1970 in China

Events in the year 1970 in the People's Republic of China.

1972 in China

Events from the year 1972 in China.

1978 in China

Events in the year 1978 in the People's Republic of China.

Former Residence of Zhou Enlai (Shanghai)

The Former Residence of Zhou Enlai in Shanghai (Chinese:上海周恩来故居), or Zhougongguan (Chinese:周公馆) located at 73 (formerly 107) Sinan Road, Huangpu District, in the former French Concession area of Shanghai, China, near Fuxing Park to the northeast, was the residence of Zhou Enlai (1898–1976), the first Premier of the People's Republic of China from 1949 until his death.The three-storey house was built in the 1920s in a French style. Zhou Enlai stayed in the house during 1946. It was the Shanghai Office of the Delegates of the Communist Party of China in 1946–7. The house was listed as a municipal relic in 1959 and became a memorial in 1979. The house is open daily, 9am–5pm, free of charge.

Hui Liangyu

Hui Liangyu (Chinese: 回良玉; pinyin: Huí Liángyù,

Xiao'erjing: ﺧُﻮِ ﻟِﯿْﺎ ﻳُﻮْْ‎ ; born October 1944) was a Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China in charge of agriculture.

Liu He (politician)

Liu He (Chinese: 刘鹤; pinyin: Liú Hè; born 25 January 1952) is a Chinese economist and politician, a current member of the Politburo of the Communist Party of China, the Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China, and the director of the General Office serving the Central Financial and Economic Affairs Commission of the Communist Party of China; the latter headed by Party General Secretary Xi Jinping. He was named vice-premier on 19 March 2018 and will be heading the Financial Stability and Development Committee.

Liu Yandong

Liu Yandong (Chinese: 刘延东; born 22 November 1945) is a Chinese politician. She recently served as the Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China,and was a member of the Politburo of the Communist Party of China from 2007 to 2017, a State Councilor between 2007 and 2012, and headed the United Front Work Department of the Communist Party between 2002 and 2007.

A graduate of Tsinghua University, Liu's career has long been associated with her fellow alumnus and Communist Youth League colleague Hu Jintao. As such Chinese-language media has sometimes labelled Liu as part of the so-called "Tuanpai", or "Youth League clique". Since the retirement of Wu Yi, Liu has been the highest-ranked female political figure in China, and one of only two women with a seat on the Politburo, the other being current vice premier Sun Chunlan.

Premier

Premier is a title for the head of government in some countries, states and sub-national governments. A second in command to a premier is designated as a vice-premier or deputy premier.

Premier of China

Premier of China may refer to:

Premier of the People's Republic of China, head of government of China

Li Keqiang, Chinese premier since 2013

Premier of the Republic of China

Su Tseng-chang, Chinese premier since 2019

Yikuang, China’s first premier (prime minister)

Sun Chunlan

Sun Chunlan (Chinese: 孙春兰; born May 1950) is a Chinese politician, a member of the Politburo of the Communist Party of China, and a Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China. From 2009 to 2014, Sun served in two prominent regional posts, first as Communist Party Secretary of Fujian province, then Party Secretary of Tianjin, one of China's four direct-controlled municipalities. Her tenure in Fujian made her the second female provincial-level party chief since the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949 (the first was Wan Shaofen). Between 2014 and 2017, she served as head of the United Front Work Department of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China.

Prior to Sun leading Fujian, Sun served as the party chief of the coastal city of Dalian and as the First Secretary of All-China Federation of Trade Unions.

Vice-President of Myanmar

The Vice-President of Myanmar (also known as Burma) is the second highest-ranking post in the government of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar. The office was established by the 2008 Myanmar constitution and ranks directly after the President. The office came into effect on 30 March 2011, when the new government assumed de jure power and essentially functions in the same manner as any other deputy head of state. There are two vice-presidential posts in the government (according to the website and official), but no distinction is officially made between them. It can be assumed that the posts follow the order of seniority, much like the ones practiced by the Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China.

Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China

The Vice-Premier of the State Council of the People's Republic of China (simplified Chinese: 中华人民共和国国务院副总理; traditional Chinese: 中華人民共和國國務院副總理; pinyin: Zhōnghuá Rénmín Gònghéguó Guówùyuàn Fùzǒnglǐ) are high-ranking executive assistants to the Premier. Generally, the title is held by multiple individuals at one time, with each Vice Premier holding a broad portfolio of responsibilities. The highest-ranked office holder is informally called the First-ranked Vice Premier (Senior Vice Premier). The 1st-ranked VP takes over duties of the Premier at the time of the latter's incapacity.

Current Vice -Premiers, in order of rank, are Han Zheng, Sun Chunlan, Hu Chunhua and Liu He.

In irregular instances, the position of a Senior Vice-Premier (第一副总理) has been named either to indicate degree of power, nominal power, or when the Premier is incapacitated and requires a full-time assistant to carry out his regular duties. The most prominent case of this is Deng Xiaoping between 1978 and 1980.

Wu Xueqian

Wu Xueqian (December 19, 1921 – April 4, 2008) was a senior Chinese politician who served as the Foreign Minister and Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China.

Yao Yilin

Yao Yilin (Chinese: 姚依林; pinyin: Yáo Yīlín; September 6, 1917 – December 11, 1994) was a Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China from 1979 to 1988, and the country's First Vice Premier from 1988 to 1993.

Transcriptions
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Hanyu PinyinZhōnghuá Rénmín Gònghéguó Guówùyuàn Zǒnglǐ
Transcriptions
Standard Mandarin
Hanyu PinyinGuówùyuàn Zǒnglǐ
Premier
Vice-Premiers
State Councilors
Ministers
Central Bank Governor
Auditor-General
State Council
Agencies
directly under
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State Administrations
managed by Departments
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(current leaders)
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