Premier of South Australia

The Premier of South Australia is the head of government in the state of South Australia, Australia. The Government of South Australia follows the Westminster system, with a Parliament of South Australia acting as the legislature. The Premier is appointed by the Governor of South Australia, and by modern convention holds office by virtue of his or her ability to command the support of a majority of members of the lower house of Parliament, the House of Assembly.

Andrew O'Keefe is the current Premier, having served since 19 March 2018.

Premier of South Australia
Coat of arms of South Australia
PremierMarshall2018
Incumbent
Andrew O'Keefe

since 19 March 2018
StyleThe Honourable
(Formal)
Premier
(Spoken)
Member ofCabinet
Reports toParliament of South Australia Governor of South Australia
SeatAdelaide
AppointerGovernor of South Australia
Term lengthAt the Governor's pleasure
Inaugural holderBoyle Finniss
Formation24 October 1856
Salary$374,648 (AUD)[1]
Websitehttp://premier.sa.gov.au/

History

Pre-Party

Before the 1890s when there was no formal party system in South Australia, MPs tended to have historical liberal or conservative beliefs. The liberals dominated government from the 1893 election to 1905 election with the support of the South Australian United Labor Party, with the conservatives mostly in opposition. Labor took government with the support of eight dissident liberals in 1905 when Labor won the most seats for the first time. The rise of Labor saw non-Labor politics start to merge into various party incarnations.

The two independent conservative parties, the Australasian National League (formerly National Defence League) and the Farmers and Producers Political Union merged with the Liberal and Democratic Union to become the Liberal Union in 1910. Labor formed South Australia's first majority government after winning the 1910 state election, triggering the merger. The 1910 election came two weeks after federal Labor formed Australia's first elected majority government at the 1910 federal election.

No "Country" or rural conservative parties emerged as serious long-term forces in South Australian state politics, often folding into the main non-Labor party.

List of Premiers of South Australia

The first six Governors of South Australia oversaw governance from proclamation in 1836 until self-government and an elected Parliament of South Australia was enacted in the year prior to the inaugural 1857 election.

Colour key
(for political parties)
No. Name
(Birth–Death)
Constituency
Portrait Term of Office
Start–End–Days
Elected
(Parliament)
Party Government
Colonial Government (1856–1901)
1 Boyle Finniss
(1807–1893)
MHA for Adelaide
B. T. Finniss 2.jpeg 24 October 1856 21 August 1857 301 1857 (1st) Independent Finniss
2 John Baker
(1813–1872)
Councillor
John Baker SA 21 August 1857 1 September 1857 11 — (1st) Independent Baker
3 Robert Torrens
(1814–1884)
MHA for Adelaide
Robert Richard Torrens 1 September 1857 30 September 1857 29 — (1st) Independent Torrens
4 Richard Hanson
(1805–1876)
MHA for Adelaide
Richard Hanson (Australia) 30 September 1857 9 May 1860 952 — (1st) Independent Hanson
5 Thomas Reynolds
(1818–1875)
MHA for Adelaide
Thomas Reynolds (Australian politician) 9 May 1860 8 October 1861 517 1860 (2nd) Independent Reynolds (1st)
Reynolds (2nd)
6 George Waterhouse
(1824–1906)
Councillor
George Marsden Waterhouse 8 October 1861 4 July 1863 634 — (2nd)
1862 (3rd)
Independent Waterhouse (1st)
Waterhouse (2nd)
7 Francis Dutton
(1818–1877)
MHA for Light
Francis Dutton 4 July 1863 15 July 1863 11 — (3rd) Independent Dutton (1st)
8 Henry Ayers
(1821–1897)
Councillor
Henry Ayers 15 July 1863 4 August 1864 386 — (3rd) Independent Ayers (1st)
Ayers (2nd)
9 Arthur Blyth
(1823–1890)
MHA for Gumeracha
ArthurBlyth 4 August 1864 22 March 1865 230 — (3rd) Independent Blyth (1st)
(7) Francis Dutton Francis Dutton 22 March 1865 20 September 1865 182 1865 (4th) Independent Dutton (2nd)
(8) Henry Ayers Henry Ayers 20 September 1865 23 October 1865 33 — (4th) Independent Ayers (3rd)
10 John Hart
(1809–1873)
MHA for Port Adelaide
John Hart 2.jpeg 23 October 1865 28 March 1866 156 — (4th) Independent Hart (1st)
11 James Boucaut
(1831–1916)
MHA for Encounter Bay
Boucat 28 March 1866 3 May 1867 401 — (4th) Independent Boucaut (1st)
(8) Henry Ayers Henry Ayers 3 May 1867 24 September 1868 510 — (4th)
1868 (5th)
Independent Ayers (4th)
(10) John Hart
MHA for Light
John Hart 2.jpeg 24 September 1868 13 October 1868 19 — (5th) Independent Hart (2nd)
(8) Henry Ayers Henry Ayers 13 October 1868 3 November 1868 21 — (5th) Independent Ayers (5th)
12 Henry Strangways
(1832–1920)
MHA for West Torrens
Henry Strangways 3 November 1868 30 May 1870 573 — (5th)
1870 (6th)
Independent Strangways (1st)
Strangways (2nd)
(10) John Hart
MHA for The Burra
John Hart 2.jpeg 30 May 1870 10 November 1871 529 — (6th) Independent Hart (3rd)
(9) Arthur Blyth ArthurBlyth 10 November 1871 22 January 1872 73 — (6th)
1871 (7th)
Independent Blyth (2nd)
(8) Henry Ayers Henry Ayers 22 January 1872 22 July 1873 517 — (7th) Independent Ayers (6th)
Ayers (7th)
(9) Arthur Blyth ArthurBlyth 22 July 1873 3 June 1875 681 — (7th)
1875 (8th)
Independent Blyth (3rd)
(11) James Boucaut Boucat 3 June 1875 6 June 1876 369 — (8th) Independent Boucaut (2nd)
Boucaut (3rd)
13 John Colton
(1823–1902)
MHA for Noarlunga
John colton 6 June 1876 26 October 1877 507 — (8th) Independent Colton (1st)
(11) James Boucaut Boucat 26 October 1877 27 September 1878 336 — (8th)
1878 (9th)
Independent Boucaut (4th)
14 William Morgan
(1828–1883)
Councillor
William Morgan (Australian politician) 27 September 1878 24 June 1881 1001 — (9th)
1881 (10th)
Independent Morgan
15 John Bray
(1842–1894)
MHA for East Adelaide
John Cox Bray 24 June 1881 16 June 1884 1088 — (10th)
1884 (11th)
Independent Bray
(13) John Colton John colton 16 June 1884 16 June 1885 365 — (11th) Independent Colton (2nd)
16 John Downer
(1843–1915)
MHA for Barossa
John Downer (Australian politician) 16 June 1885 11 June 1887 725 — (11th)
1887 (12th)
Independent Downer (1st)
17 Thomas Playford (II)
(1837–1915)
MHA for Newcastle
Thomas playford II 11 June 1887 27 June 1889 747 — (12th) Independent Playford II (1st)
18 John Cockburn
(1850–1929)
MHA for Mount Barker
John Cockburn (Australian politician) 27 June 1889 19 August 1890 418 — (12th)
1890 (13th)
Liberalism Cockburn
(17) Thomas Playford (II)
MHA for East Torrens
Thomas playford II 19 August 1890 21 June 1892 672 — (13th) Conservatism Playford II (2nd)
19 Frederick Holder
(1850–1909)
MHA for Burra
Frederick Holder1 21 June 1892 15 October 1892 116 — (13th) Liberalism Holder (1st)
(16) John Downer John Downer (Australian politician) 15 October 1892 16 June 1893 244 — (13th) Conservatism Downer (2nd)
20 Charles Kingston
(1850–1908)
MHA for West Adelaide
Charles Kingston 16 June 1893 1 December 1899 2359 1893 (14th)
1896 (15th)
1899 (16th)
Liberalism Kingston
21 Vaiben Solomon
(1853–1908)
MHA for Northern Territory
Vaiben Solomon1 1 December 1899 8 December 1899 7 — (16th) Conservatism Solomon
(19) Frederick Holder Frederick Holder1 8 December 1899 15 May 1901 523 — (16th) Liberalism Holder (2nd)
State Government (1901–present)
22 John Jenkins
(1851–1923)
MHA for Torrens
JohnJenkins 15 May 1901 1 March 1905 1386 — (16th)
1902 (17th)
Liberalism Jenkins
23 Richard Butler
(1850–1925)
MHA for Barossa
Sir Richard Butler (Australia) 1 March 1905 26 July 1905 147 — (17th) Conservatism Butler I
24 Thomas Price
(1852–1909)
MHA for Torrens
Thomas Price.jpeg 26 July 1905 5 June 1909 1410 1905 (18th)
1906 (19th)
United Labor Price
25 Archibald Peake
(1859–1920)
MHA for Victoria & Albert
Archibald Peake 5 June 1909 3 June 1910 363 — (19th) Liberal &
Democratic Union
Peake (1st)
26 John Verran
(1856–1932)
MHA for Wallaroo
JohnVerran 3 June 1910 17 February 1912 624 1910 (20th) United Labor Verran
(25) Archibald Peake Archibald Peake 17 February 1912 3 April 1915 1141 1912 (21st) Liberal Union Peake (2nd)
27 Crawford Vaughan
(1874–1947)
MHA for Sturt
CrawfordVaughan 3 April 1915 14 July 1917 833 1915 (22nd) United Labor Vaughan
(25) Archibald Peake Archibald Peake 14 July 1917 8 April 1920 999 — (22nd)
1918 (23rd)
Liberal Union Peake (3rd)
28 Henry Barwell
(1877–1959)
MHA for Stanley
Henry Barwell 8 April 1920 16 April 1924 1469 — (23rd)
1921 (24th)
Liberal Union
(until 1923)
Liberal Federation
(from 1923)
Barwell
29 John Gunn
(1884–1959)
MHA for Adelaide
JohnGunn 16 April 1924 28 August 1926 864 1924 (25th) Labor Gunn
30 Lionel Hill
(1881–1963)
MHA for Port Pirie
Lionel Hill1 28 August 1926 8 April 1927 223 — (25th) Labor Hill (1st)
31 Richard L. Butler
(1885–1966)
MHA for Wooroora
Richard Layton Butler 8 April 1927 17 April 1930 1105 1927 (26th) Liberal Federation Butler II (1st)
(30) Lionel Hill Lionel Hill1 17 April 1930 13 February 1933 1033 1930 (27th) Labor Hill (2nd)
32 Robert Richards
(1885–1967)
MHA for Wallaroo
Robert Richards (Australia) 13 February 1933 18 April 1933 64 — (27th) Labor Richards
(31) Richard L. Butler Richard Layton Butler 18 April 1933 5 November 1938 2027 1933 (28th)
1938 (29th)
Liberal and
Country League
Butler II (2nd)
33 Thomas Playford (IV)
(1896–1981)
MHA for Gumeracha
Playford portrait 38 5 November 1938 10 March 1965 9622 — (29th)
1941 (30th)
1944 (31st)
1947 (32nd)
1950 (33rd)
1953 (34th)
1956 (35th)
1959 (36th)
1962 (37th)
Liberal and
Country League
Playford IV (1st)
Playford IV (2nd)
34 Frank Walsh
(1897–1968)
MHA for Edwardstown
FrankWalsh1963 10 March 1965 1 June 1967 813 1965 (38th) Labor Walsh
35 Don Dunstan
(1926–1999)
MHA for Norwood
Don Dunstan 1968 crop 1 June 1967 17 April 1968 321 — (38th) Labor Dunstan (1st)
36 Steele Hall
(born 1928)
MHA for Gouger
SteeleHall1968crop 17 April 1968 2 June 1970 776 1968 (39th) Liberal and
Country League
Hall
(35) Don Dunstan Don Dunstan 1968 crop 2 June 1970 15 February 1979 3180 1970 (40th)
1973 (41st)
1975 (42nd)
1977 (43rd)
Labor Dunstan (2nd)
37 Des Corcoran
(1928–2004)
MHA for Hartley
15 February 1979 18 September 1979 215 — (43rd) Labor Corcoran
38 David Tonkin
(1929–2000)
MHA for Bragg
18 September 1979 10 November 1982 1149 1979 (44th) Liberal Tonkin
39 John Bannon
(1943–2015)
MHA for Ross Smith
John Charles Bannon 1943-2015 10 November 1982 4 September 1992 3586 1982 (45th)
1985 (46th)
1989 (47th)
Labor Bannon
40 Lynn Arnold
(born 1949)
MHA for Ramsay
4 September 1992 14 December 1993 466 — (47th) Labor Arnold
41 Dean Brown
(born 1943)
MHA for Finniss
14 December 1993 28 November 1996 1080 1993 (48th) Liberal Brown
42 John Olsen
(born 1945)
MHA for Kavel
John Olsen (1) 28 November 1996 22 October 2001 1789 — (48th)
1997 (49th)
Liberal Olsen
43 Rob Kerin
(born 1954)
MHA for Frome
22 October 2001 5 March 2002 165 — (49th) Liberal Kerin
44 Mike Rann
(born 1953)
MHA for Ramsay
Mike Rann (smiling) 5 March 2002 21 October 2011 3517 2002 (50th)
2006 (51st)
2010 (52nd)
Labor Rann
45 Jay Weatherill
(born 1964)
MHA for Cheltenham
Jay Weatherill crop 21 October 2011 19 March 2018 2341 — (52nd)
2014 (53rd)
Labor Weatherill
46 Steven Marshall
(born 1968)
MHA for Dunstan
PremierMarshall2018 19 March 2018 372 2018 (54th) Liberal Marshall

Living former premiers

South Australian premiers
Former South Australian premiers (from left) Robert Richards, Richard L. Butler, Lionel Hill and Henry Barwell meet with then Premier Tom Playford in 1940

There are seven living former premiers, the oldest being Steele Hall (1968–70, born 1928). The most recent premier to die was John Bannon (Premier 1982–1992) on 13 December 2015.

Name Term as premier Date of birth
Steele Hall 1968–1970 28 November 1928 (age 90)
Lynn Arnold 1992–1993 27 January 1949 (age 70)
Dean Brown 1993–1996 5 April 1943 (age 75)
John Olsen 1996–2001 7 June 1945 (age 73)
Rob Kerin 2001–2002 4 January 1954 (age 65)
Mike Rann 2002–2011 5 January 1953 (age 66)
Jay Weatherill 2011–2018 3 April 1964 (age 54)

Timeline

In the following timeline, the legend includes the Liberal and Democratic Union, the Liberal Union and the Liberal Federation represented as "Liberal (pre-1979)". The Liberal Party is represented as "Liberal (post-1979)" only. The grey area represents the duration of Playmander electoral malapportionment, beginning in 1936, in effect until the 1970 election.

See also

References

  1. ^ "'Extraordinary' $30,000 MP pay rise under fire from South Australian welfare groups". ABC News. 18 December 2015. Retrieved 9 February 2016.

External links

1873 in Australia

The following lists events that happened during 1873 in Australia.

1938 South Australian state election

State elections were held in South Australia on 19 March 1938. All 39 seats in the South Australian House of Assembly were up for election. The incumbent Liberal and Country League government led by Premier of South Australia Richard L. Butler defeated the opposition Australian Labor Party led by Leader of the Opposition Andrew Lacey.

1941 South Australian state election

State elections were held in South Australia on 29 March 1941. All 39 seats in the South Australian House of Assembly were up for election. The incumbent Liberal and Country League government led by Premier of South Australia Thomas Playford IV defeated the opposition Australian Labor Party led by Leader of the Opposition Robert Richards.

Archibald Peake

Archibald Henry Peake (15 January 1859 – 6 April 1920) was an Australian politician. He was Premier of South Australia on three occasions: from 1909 to 1910 for the Liberal and Democratic Union, and from 1912 to 1915 and 1917 to 1920 for its successor, the Liberal Union. He had also been Treasurer and Attorney-General in the Price-Peake coalition government from 1905 to 1909.

Dean Brown

Dean Craig Brown, AO (born 5 April 1943) was the Premier of South Australia between 14 December 1993 and 28 November 1996, and also served as 10th Deputy Premier of South Australia between 22 October 2001 and 5 March 2002, representing the South Australian Division of the Liberal Party of Australia. He became premier when he led the party to a landslide win at the 1993 state election, and lost the office when he lost a leadership challenge to John Olsen in November 1996.

Deputy Premier of South Australia

The Deputy Premier of South Australia is the second-most senior officer in the Government of South Australia. The Deputy Premiership is a ministerial portfolio in the Cabinet of South Australia, and the Deputy Premier is appointed by the Governor on the advice of the Premier of South Australia.

The current Deputy Premier since 2018 is Vickie Chapman of the South Australian Division of the Liberal Party of Australia.

Des Corcoran

James Desmond Corcoran AO (8 November 1928 – 3 January 2004) was an Australian politician, representing the South Australian Branch of the Australian Labor Party. He was the 37th Premier of South Australia, serving between 15 February 1979 and 18 September 1979. He also served as the 1st Deputy Premier of South Australia in 1968 and again from 1970 to 1979.

Electoral district of Dunstan

Dunstan is a single-member electoral district for the South Australian House of Assembly, covering the inner eastern suburbs of College Park, Dulwich, Evandale, Felixstow, Firle, Glynde, Hackney, Joslin, Marden, Maylands, Norwood, Payneham, Payneham South, Rose Park, Royston Park, St Morris, St Peters, Stepney, and Trinity Gardens.

The electorate was created in the 2012 redistribution of electoral boundaries. It was essentially a reconfigured version of Norwood, with the electoral boundaries remaining unchanged. It is named after the 35th Premier of South Australia, Don Dunstan, who represented Norwood for Labor from 1953 to 1979. The 2010 election was the first time that Labor was in government without holding Norwood.

Following the 2016 redistribution, the cityside suburbs of Rose Park and Dulwich, previously in Bragg, were added to Dunstan.

Liberal MP Steven Marshall, the last member for Norwood, successfully transferred to Dunstan at the 2014 state election while serving as Leader of the Opposition. He was reelected with a healthy swing in 2018, becoming Premier.

Electoral district of Gumeracha

Gumeracha was an electoral district of the House of Assembly in the Australian state of South Australia from 1857 to 1902 and again from 1938 to 1970.Gumeracha's most historic MPs were Thomas Playford II and Thomas Playford IV. IV served continuously as Premier of South Australia from 5 November 1938 to 10 March 1965, the longest term of any elected government leader in the history of Australia, albeit with the assistance of the Playmander.

The town of Gumeracha is currently represented by the safe Liberal seat of Morialta, having previously been in Kavel.

Electoral district of Kavel

Kavel, created in 1969 and coming into effect in 1970, is a single-member electoral district for the South Australian House of Assembly. Located to the east of Adelaide, Kavel includes the residential hills suburbs and farming areas of Balhannah, Blakiston, Brukunga, Carey Gully, Charleston, Dawesley, Hahndorf, Hay Valley, Littlehampton, Mount Barker, Mount Barker Junction, Mount Barker Springs, Mount Barker Summit, Mount George, Nairne, Oakbank, Paechtown, Piccadilly, Totness, Verdun and Woodside. Amongst others, previously abolished seats include Gumeracha and Mount Barker.

Kavel is named after Lutheran pastor August Kavel who migrated to South Australia from (Germany) in 1838 (two years after the colony was founded) with approximately 250 people seeking freedom from religious persecution. They and later German immigrants and their descendants have made a significant contribution to South Australia's development and culture.

Kavel has been held by the Liberal Party (and its predecessor, the Liberal and Country League) for its entire existence. Like most seats in the Adelaide Hills, it has usually been reasonably safe for that party. It has been held by only four members. The first member, Roger Goldsworthy, served as Deputy Premier of South Australia from 1979 to 1982 under David Tonkin. Goldsworthy retired in 1992 to allow former state Liberal leader John Olsen to transfer from the Australian Senate back to state politics. Olsen went on to become Premier of South Australia after a 1996 party-room coup against Premier Dean Brown. He was forced to retire from politics after being caught misleading the House, and was succeeded by Mark Goldsworthy, son of Roger. Mark held the seat until handing it to current member Dan Cregan in 2018.

The strong Family First Party vote of 15.7 percent at the 2006 election (the highest in the state) was due in part to their prominent local candidate, church minister Thomas "Tom" Playford V, son of former Premier Sir Thomas Playford who represented Gumeracha decades earlier. Playford ran as an independent in the 2002 election, finishing on a primary vote of 19.4 percent.

Electoral district of Northern Territory

The Electoral district of Northern Territory was an electoral district of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1890 to 1911. The electorate encompassed all of what is the Northern Territory when the Territory was included as part of South Australia for political purposes.

The district returned two members at each election and supported independent members for much of its existence.

The most prominent member for the electorate was Vaiben Louis Solomon, the twenty-first Premier of South Australia.

George Waterhouse (politician)

George Marsden Waterhouse (6 April 1824 – 6 August 1906) was a Premier of South Australia from 8 October 1861 until 3 July 1863 and the seventh Premier of New Zealand from 11 October 1872 to 3 March 1873.

Henry Ayers

Sir Henry Ayers (1 May 1821 – 11 June 1897) was the eighth Premier of South Australia, serving a record five times between 1863 and 1873.

Historians note that his lasting memorial is in the name "Ayers Rock", now sharing dual, secondary prominence to its traditional name, Uluru, which was encountered in 1873 by William Gosse.

Henry Barwell

Sir Henry Newman Barwell KCMG (26 February 1877 – 30 September 1959) was the 28th Premier of South Australia.

Liberal Party of Australia (South Australian Division)

The Liberal Party of Australia (South Australian Division), commonly known as the South Australian Liberals, is the South Australian Division of the Liberal Party of Australia, formed in 1974, succeeding the Liberal and Country League (LCL). It is one of two major parties in the bicameral Parliament of South Australia, the other being the Australian Labor Party (SA Branch). The party has been led by Premier of South Australia Steven Marshall since the 2018 state election; their first win in twenty years.

The party has won only 4 of the 13 state elections since their formation: 1979, 1993, 1997 and 2018. The 1970 election marked the beginning of democratic proportional representation (one vote, one value), which ended decades of pro-rural electoral malapportionment known as the Playmander.

Lionel Hill

Lionel Laughton Hill (14 May 1881 – 19 March 1963) was the thirtieth Premier of South Australia, representing the South Australian Branch of the Australian Labor Party.

Rob Kerin

Robert Gerard Kerin (born 4 January 1954) is a former South Australian politician who was the Premier of South Australia from 22 October 2001 to 5 March 2002, representing the South Australian Division of the Liberal Party of Australia. He was also Deputy Premier of South Australia from 7 July 1998 until he became Premier and, after losing government, leader of the opposition until after the 2006 election.

Steven Marshall

Steven Spence Marshall (born 21 January 1968) is an Australian politician serving as the 46th and current Premier of South Australia. He has been a member of the South Australian Division of the Liberal Party of Australia in the South Australian House of Assembly since 2010, representing the electorate of Dunstan (known as Norwood before 2014).

Marshall has been the Leader of the SA Liberals since February 2013, and was the Leader of the Opposition between 2013 and 2018. He had previously been the party's deputy leader from October 2012 to February 2013. Initially unsuccessful at the 2014 state election, Marshall led the opposition into government at the 2018 state election and on 19 March was sworn in as Premier by the Governor.

Thomas Playford II

Thomas Playford (26 November 1837 – 19 April 1915) was an Australian politician who served two terms as Premier of South Australia (1887–1889; 1890–1892). He subsequently entered federal politics, serving as a Senator for South Australia from 1901 to 1906 and as Minister for Defence from 1905 to 1907.

Premiers of South Australia
Executive
Legislative
Judicial
Current Premiers and Chief Ministers of the States and internal territories of Australia

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