Pratt & Whitney T34

The Pratt & Whitney T34 (company designation PT2) was an axial flow[2] turboprop engine designed and built by Pratt & Whitney. Its model name was Turbo-Wasp.[2]

T34 Turbo-Wasp
Pratt-Whitney T-34 B-17 testbed NAN10-50
A B-17 Flying Fortress testbed for the T-34 turboprop engine. This aircraft was later flown on airshow circuits as the "Liberty Belle".[1]
Type Turboprop
National origin United States
Manufacturer Pratt & Whitney
First run ca. 1950
Major applications C-133 Cargomaster

Design and development

In 1945 the United States Navy funded the development of a turboprop engine. The T34 was produced from 1951 to 1960, but never used in U.S. Navy aircraft production.[3]

The YT34 engine with three wide-bladed propellers was made for two Navy Lockheed R7V-2 Constellation(C-121s) variants, for testing. Flight tests were on 1 September 1954.[4]

In September 1950, a testbed Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress flew with a T34 turboprop mounted in the nose of the bomber. The first application for the T34 was the Boeing YC-97J Stratofreighter, which later became the Aero Spacelines Super Guppy. The next application for the engine was the Douglas C-133 Cargomaster.[3]

Variants

Douglas C-133A Cargomaster in flight
The Douglas C-133 Cargomaster was the largest user of the T34.
T34-P-1
5,700 shp (4,300 kW) equivalent.
T34-P-2
Similar to -1.
T34-P-3
6,000 shp (4,500 kW) equivalent.
YT34-P-5
5,229 shp (3,899 kW) equivalent[5]
T34-P-6
5,531 shp (4,124 kW) equivalent[6]
T34-P-7
T34-P-7W
7,100 shp (5,300 kW) equivalent, w/water injection
T34-P-9W
7,500 shp (5,600 kW) equivalent, w/water injection
T34-P-12
YT34-P-12A
5,500 shp (4,100 kW) equivalent[7]
T34-P-6
;PT2F-1:5,500 shp (4,100 kW) equivalent, unbuilt civilian version planned to power the Lockheed L-1249B.[8]
PT2G-3
5,600 shp (4,200 kW) equivalent, unbuilt civilian version planned to power the Lockheed L-1449 and possibly the L-1549.[8]

Applications

Engines on display

Specifications (T34-P3)

Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1961–62[12]

General characteristics

  • Type: Turboprop
  • Length: 156.8 in (3,983 mm)
  • Diameter: 33.75 in (857 mm)
  • Dry weight: 2,590 lb (1,175 kg)

Components

  • Compressor: 13-stage axial compressor
  • Combustors: annular combustion chamber with eight flame tubes
  • Turbine: three-stage axial-flow
  • Fuel type: JP-4
  • Oil system: closed circuit

Performance

See also

Comparable engines

Related lists

References

  1. ^ warbird registry.org - B-17G/44-85734; Retrieved 6/21/11
  2. ^ a b Flight Global: 1952 Archive
  3. ^ a b Pratt&Whitney: T34 Turboprop
  4. ^ Google Books: Lockheed secret projects: Inside the Skunk Works By Dennis R. Jenkins; p.28-29
  5. ^ a b alternatewars.com - YC-97 Characteristics Summary; Retrieved 10/12/11
  6. ^ a b alternatewars.com - YC-121F Charactaristics Summary; Retrieved 11/6/11
  7. ^ Breffort, Dominique. Lockheed Constellation: from Excalibur to Starliner Civilian and Military Variants. Paris: Histoire and Collecions, 2006. p. 134
  8. ^ a b Breffort, Dominique. Lockheed Constellation: from Excalibur to Starliner Civilian and Military Variants. Histoire and Collecions, 2006. p. 113
  9. ^ Breffort, Dominique. Lockheed Constellation: from Excalibur to Starliner Civilian and Military Variants. Paris: Histoire and Collecions, 2006. Print. ISBN 2-915239-62-2
  10. ^ US War Plane: Post WWII Aircraft Engine Guide
  11. ^ a b Engine History: NASM Storage
  12. ^ Taylor 1961, pp. 513–515.
  • Gunston, Bill (2006). World Encyclopedia of Aero Engines, 5th Edition. Phoenix Mill, Gloucestershire, England, UK: Sutton Publishing Limited. p. 79. ISBN 0-7509-4479-X.
  • Taylor, John W. R. (1961). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1961–62. London: Sampson Low, Marston & Company.
  • Breffort, Dominique (2006). Lockheed Constellation: from Excalibur to Starliner Civilian and Military Variants. Paris: Histoire and Collecions. p. 176. ISBN 2-915239-62-2.

External links

Chris Pratt

Christopher Michael Pratt (born June 21, 1979) is an American actor. He rose to prominence for his television roles, particularly as Andy Dwyer in the NBC sitcom Parks and Recreation (2009–2015), for which he received critical acclaim and was nominated for the Critics' Choice Television Award for Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series in 2013. He also starred earlier in his career as Bright Abbott in The WB drama series Everwood (2002–2006) and had roles in Wanted (2008), Jennifer's Body (2009), Moneyball (2011), The Five-Year Engagement (2012), Zero Dark Thirty (2013), Delivery Man (2013), and Her (2013).

Pratt achieved leading man status in 2014 after starring in two critically and commercially successful films, Warner Animation Group's The Lego Movie as Emmet Brickowski and Marvel Studios' Guardians of the Galaxy as Star-Lord. In 2015, he starred in Jurassic World, the fourth installment in the Jurassic Park franchise, which was his most financially successful film up until the release of Avengers: Infinity War, and later Avengers: Endgame; he reprised the former role in the sequel Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom in 2018. In 2015, Time named Pratt one of the 100 most influential people in the world on the annual Time 100 list.Pratt continued his leading man run in 2016 with The Magnificent Seven and Passengers. He reprises his role as Star-Lord in the Marvel Cinematic Universe in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017), Avengers: Infinity War (2018) and Avengers: Endgame (2019).

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