Portuguese Football Federation

The Portuguese Football Federation (Portuguese: Federação Portuguesa de Futebol) also known as FPF is the governing body of football in Portugal. It organizes the Campeonato de Portugal, the Taça de Portugal, the Supertaça Cândido de Oliveira, youth levels, women's football, beach soccer, futsal, and also the men's and the women's national football teams. Formed in 1914, it is based in the city of Oeiras.

Portuguese Football Federation
UEFA
Portuguese Football Federation
Founded31 March 1914 as Portuguese Football Union[1]
HeadquartersLisbon
FIFA affiliation1923
UEFA affiliation1954
PresidentFernando Gomes
Websitefpf.pt

Honours

National football team

National beach soccer team

National futsal team

List of presidents

Below is a list of all the 30 presidents of the Portuguese Football Federation (previously Portuguese Football Union), from 1922 to date.[1]

Presidents of UPF (1922–1927)

  1. Luís Peixoto Guimarães (1922–1925)
  2. Franklin Nunes (1925–1927)

Presidents of FPF (1927–present)

  1. João Luís de Moura (1927–1928)
  2. Luís Plácido de Sousa (1929)
  3. Salazar Carreira (1930–1931)
  4. Abílio Lagoas (1931–1932)
  5. Raúl Vieira (1934)
  6. Cruz Filipe (1934–1942)
  7. Pires de Lima (1943–1944)
  8. Bento Coelho da Rocha (1944–1946)
  9. André Navarro (1946–1951)
  10. Maia Loureiro (1951–1954; 1957–1960)
  11. Ângelo Ferrari (1954–1957)
  12. Paulo Sarmento & Francisco Mega (1960–1963)
  13. Justino Pinheiro Machado (1963–1967)
  14. Cazal Ribeiro (1967–1969)
  15. Matos Correia (1970–1971)
  16. Jorge Saraiva (1971–1972)
  17. Martins Canaverde (1972–1974)
  18. Jorge Fagundes (1974–1976)
  19. António Ribeiro Magalhães (1976; 1980–1981)
  20. António Marques (1976–1979)
  21. Morais Leitão (1979–1980)
  22. Romão Martins (1981–1983)
  23. Silva Resende (1983–1989)
  24. João Rodrigues (1989–1992)
  25. A. Lopes da Silva (1992–1993)
  26. Vitor Vasques (1993–1996)
  27. Gilberto Madaíl (1996–2011)
  28. Fernando Gomes (2011–present)

References

  1. ^ a b "History". FPF. Retrieved 4 July 2016.

External links

Coordinates: 38°43′16″N 9°09′11″W / 38.72111°N 9.15306°W

1952 Taça de Portugal Final

The 1952 Taça de Portugal Final was the final match of the 1951–52 Taça de Portugal, the 12th season of the Taça de Portugal, the premier Portuguese football cup competition organized by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). The match was played on 15 June 1952 at the Estádio Nacional in Oeiras, and opposed two Primeira Liga sides: Benfica and Sporting CP. Benfica defeated Sporting CP 5–4 to claim their sixth Taça de Portugal.

1953 Taça de Portugal Final

The 1953 Taça de Portugal Final was the final match of the 1952–53 Taça de Portugal, the 13th season of the Taça de Portugal, the premier Portuguese football cup competition organized by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). The match was played on 28 June 1953 at the Estádio Nacional in Oeiras, and opposed two Primeira Liga sides: Benfica and Porto. Benfica defeated Porto 5–0 to claim their seventh Taça de Portugal.

1958 Taça de Portugal Final

The 1958 Taça de Portugal Final was the final match of the 1957–58 Taça de Portugal, the 18th season of the Taça de Portugal, the premier Portuguese football cup competition organized by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). The match was played on 15 June 1958 at the Estádio Nacional in Oeiras, and opposed two Primeira Liga sides: Benfica and Porto. Porto defeated Benfica 1–0 to claim a second Taça de Portugal.

1959 Taça de Portugal Final

The 1959 Taça de Portugal Final was the final match of the 1958–59 Taça de Portugal, the 19th season of the Taça de Portugal, the premier Portuguese football cup competition organized by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). The match was played on 19 July 1959 at the Estádio Nacional in Oeiras, and opposed two Primeira Liga sides: Benfica and Porto. Benfica defeated Porto 1–0 to claim a tenth Taça de Portugal.

1964 Taça de Portugal Final

The 1964 Taça de Portugal Final was the final match of the 1963–64 Taça de Portugal, the 24th season of the Taça de Portugal, the premier Portuguese football cup competition organized by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). The match was played on 5 July 1964 at the Estádio Nacional in Oeiras, and opposed two Primeira Liga sides: Benfica and Porto. Benfica defeated Porto 6–2 to claim their twelfth Taça de Portugal.

1970 Taça de Portugal Final

The 1970 Taça de Portugal Final was the final match of the 1969–70 Taça de Portugal, the 30th season of the Taça de Portugal, the premier Portuguese football cup competition organized by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). The match was played on 14 June 1970 at the Estádio Nacional in Oeiras, and opposed two Primeira Liga sides: Benfica and Sporting CP. Benfica defeated Sporting CP 3–1 to claim a fourteenth Taça de Portugal.

1974 Taça de Portugal Final

The 1974 Taça de Portugal Final was the final match of the 1973–74 Taça de Portugal, the 34th season of the Taça de Portugal, the premier Portuguese football cup competition organized by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). The match was played on 9 June 1974 at the Estádio Nacional in Oeiras, and opposed two Primeira Liga sides: Benfica and Sporting CP. Sporting CP defeated Benfica 2–1 to claim a ninth Taça de Portugal.

1980 Taça de Portugal Final

The 1980 Taça de Portugal Final was the final match of the 1979–80 Taça de Portugal, the 40th season of the Taça de Portugal, the premier Portuguese football cup competition organized by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). The match was played on 7 June 1980 at the Estádio Nacional in Oeiras, and opposed two Primeira Liga sides: Benfica and Porto. Benfica defeated Porto 1–0 to claim the Taça de Portugal for a sixteenth time.In Portugal, the final was televised live on RTP. As a result of Benfica winning the Taça de Portugal, the Águias qualified for the 1980 Supertaça Cândido de Oliveira where they took on 1979–80 Primeira Divisão winners Sporting CP.

1985 Taça de Portugal Final

The 1985 Taça de Portugal Final was the final match of the 1984–85 Taça de Portugal, the 45th season of the Taça de Portugal, the premier Portuguese football cup competition organized by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). The match was played on 10 June 1985 at the Estádio Nacional in Oeiras, and opposed two Primeira Liga sides: Benfica and Porto. Benfica defeated Porto 3–1 to claim the Taça de Portugal for a nineteenth time.In Portugal, the final was televised live on RTP. As a result of Benfica winning the Taça de Portugal, the Águias qualified for the 1985 Supertaça Cândido de Oliveira where they took on their cup opponents and 1984–85 Primeira Divisão winners Porto.

1987 Taça de Portugal Final

The 1987 Taça de Portugal Final was the final match of the 1986–87 Taça de Portugal, the 47th season of the Taça de Portugal, the premier Portuguese football cup competition organized by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). The match was played on 7 June 1987 at the Estádio Nacional in Oeiras, and opposed two Primeira Liga sides: Benfica and Sporting CP. Benfica defeated Sporting CP 2–1 to claim the Taça de Portugal for a twenty first time.In Portugal, the final was televised live on RTP. As Benfica claimed both league and cup double in the same season, cup runners-up Sporting CP faced their cup final opponents in the 1987 Supertaça Cândido de Oliveira.

2013–14 Taça de Portugal

The 2013–14 Taça de Portugal was the 74th season of the Taça de Portugal, the premier Portuguese football knockout cup competition organised by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). It was contested by 156 teams from the top four tiers of Portuguese football. The competition began with the first-round matches in September 2013 and concluded with the final at the Estádio Nacional in Oeiras, on 18 May 2014.The title holders were Primeira Liga side Vitória de Guimarães who entered the 2013–14 competition in the third round, together with the Primeira Liga teams, advancing as far as the next round, where they lost 2–0 to Porto.

In the final, Benfica defeated Rio Ave 1–0, courtesy of a first-half goal by Nicolás Gaitán, and won the competition for a record 25th time. In doing so, they also established a new Portuguese record of doubles (10) and became the first club to win the domestic treble of Primeira Liga, Taça de Portugal and Taça da Liga.

As the winners of the Taça de Portugal, Benfica earned the right to play in the 2014–15 UEFA Europa League group stage. However, since they had already qualified for the 2014–15 UEFA Champions League as the 2013–14 Primeira Liga winners, Rio Ave took their place as the cup runners-up. As they did not win the Taça de Portugal, Rio Ave had to enter the competition in the third qualifying round.

In addition, Benfica qualified for the 2014 Supertaça Cândido de Oliveira, where they faced again Rio Ave, as a result of having won both league and cup titles.

2014–15 Taça de Portugal

The 2014–15 Taça de Portugal was the 75th season of the Taça de Portugal, the premier Portuguese football knockout cup competition organised by the Portuguese Football Federation.

The competition was contested by a total of 135 clubs, comprising teams from the top three tiers of Portuguese football and the winners of the District Cups. It began with the first-round matches on 6 September 2014 and concluded on 31 May 2015 with the final at the Estádio Nacional in Oeiras, where Sporting CP defeated Braga 3–1 on penalties, after a 2–2 draw at the end of extra-time. This was the first time that the competition's final was decided by a penalty shootout. With this victory, Sporting CP secured their 16th title in the competition and ended a seven-year run without winning official competitions, following their win at the 2008 Supertaça Cândido de Oliveira.

The title holders were Benfica, who beat Rio Ave 1–0 in the 2014 final to win the competition for a record 25th time. They were not able to defend their title after being defeated 1–2 by eventual finalists Braga in the fifth round.

As the winners, Sporting CP earned the right to play in the 2015–16 UEFA Europa League group stage. However, since they qualified for the 2015–16 UEFA Champions League play-off round through their league placing, their cup winners place in the 2015–16 UEFA Europa League group stage was transferred directly to the highest-placed team in the league qualified for the UEFA Europa League (Braga) – instead of being given to the cup runners-up, as in previous seasons –, with the highest-placed team in the league that did not qualify to European competitions (Belenenses) receiving a place in the third qualifying round.

Campeonato Nacional II Divisão de Futebol Feminino

The Campeonato Nacional de Promoção de Futebol Feminino (transl. National Promotion Championship of Women's Football) is the second-highest division of the Portuguese women's football league system, after the Campeonato Nacional de Futebol Feminino. It is run by the Portuguese Football Federation and began in 2008. The current champions are Marítimo, who won their first title in 2018.

Campeonato de Portugal (league)

The Campeonato de Portugal (Portuguese for Championship of Portugal) is the third-level football league in Portugal. It is the only semi-professional national league that is organized by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF).

The competition was created in 2013 as Campeonato Nacional de Seniores (Seniors National Championship) to replace the Portuguese Second and Third Divisions (third and fourth tiers of the Portuguese football league system, respectively) for the 2013–14 season. On 22 October 2015, the competition was renamed Campeonato de Portugal, its current designation.

Horta Football Association

The Horta Football Association (Portuguese: Associação de Futebol de Horta) is one of the 22 District Football Associations that are affiliated with the Portuguese Football Federation. The AF Horta administers lower-tier football in the municipalities on the islands of Faial, Pico, Flores and Corvo, as well as those clubs registered in the islands.

List of Portugal national football team captains

The first Portugal captain was Cândido de Oliveira, who captained Portugal in the international match against Spain on 18 December 1921. This was his only international appearance. Vítor Gonçalves captained Portugal in their first international on home soil, on 17 December 1922 against the same opponent. The first international captain to win a match was Jorge Vieira against Italy on 18 June 1925.

Since then, Cristiano Ronaldo went on to set the record for most captaincies of his country, with 91. Humberto Coelho, João Domingos Pinto, Vítor Baía, and Fernando Couto have all captained Portugal at least 40 times. This article includes matches in which the Portuguese Football Federation awarded full caps, despite FIFA not listing those matches as full internationals.

Portugal women's national football team

The Portugal women's national football team represents Portugal in international women's football competition. The team is controlled by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF) and competes as a member of UEFA in various international football tournaments such as the FIFA Women's World Cup, UEFA Women's Euro, the Summer Olympics, and the Algarve Cup.

Portuguese District Football Associations

There are 22 district Football Associations in Portugal. These organizations are the governing bodies (alongside the Portuguese Football Federation) of football in each Portuguese district.

Taça Federação Portuguesa de Futebol

The Portuguese Football Federation Cup was a competition organized by the Portuguese Football Federation. It was only played in the 1976–77 season. There was an exclusive edition for each of the three top Portuguese divisions, resulting in three champions from different divisions.

This cup is not to be confused with the actual national cup, the Taça de Portugal, despite both being run by the PFF.

Men's
Women's
District Associations
Defunct competitions
Men's
Women's
National football associations of Europe (UEFA)
Current
Defunct
Summer Olympic Sports
Winter Olympic Sports
Other IOC Recognised Sports
Paralympics and Disabled Sports
Others Sports

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