Pordoselene

Pordoselene (Ancient Greek: Πορδοσελήνη) or Poroselene (Ποροσελήνη) was a town and polis (city-state) of ancient Aeolis.[1] It was located on the chief island of the Hecatonnesi, a group of small islands lying between Lesbos and the coast of Asia Minor, which was also called Prodoselene.[2][3] Strabo says that some, in order to avoid the dirty allusion presented by this name, called it Poroselene,[4] which is the form employed by Ptolemy,[5] Pliny the Elder,[6] and Aelian.[7] At a still later time the name was changed into Proselene, under which form the town appears as a bishop's see.[8] Aristotle mentions the town in his History of Animals where it was on the extremity of a road that formed the border between an area of the island that contained weasels and another area that did not have them.[9]

The place-name "Nesos Pordoselene" (Νεσος Πορδοσελήνε) appears in the list of tributes to ancient Athens of the year 422/1 BCE but there are different opinions on whether Nesos (or Nasos in the Aeolic dialect) and [Pordoselen were a single city or if they are two different cities.[1]

Silver and bronze coins dating from the 5th and 4th centuries BCE are preserved. It is proposed that the small island of Maden Adası or the island of Alibey Adası located between Lesbos and Asia Minor may be the location of Pordoselene, although the second possibility seems to prevail since the archeology and the low fertility of Maden Adası does not show that there has been an old settlement there.[10][11][1] The editors of the Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World equate Nasos and Pordoselene.[10]

References

  1. ^ a b c Mogens Herman Hansen & Thomas Heine Nielsen (2004). "Aeolis and Southwestern Mysia". An inventory of archaic and classical poleis. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 1047, 1049–1050. ISBN 0-19-814099-1.
  2. ^ Periplus of Pseudo-Scylax, 97; Strabo. Geographica. xiii. p.618. Page numbers refer to those of Isaac Casaubon's edition.
  3. ^ Stephanus of Byzantium. Ethnica. s.v. Πορδοσελήνη.
  4. ^ Strabo. Geographica. xiii. p.618. Page numbers refer to those of Isaac Casaubon's edition.
  5. ^ Ptolemy. The Geography. 5.2.5.
  6. ^ Pliny. Naturalis Historia. 5.31.38.
  7. ^ N. An. 2.6.
  8. ^ Hierocles. Synecdemus. p. 686.
  9. ^ Aristotle, History of Animals VIII, 28,605b-606a.
  10. ^ a b Richard Talbert, ed. (2000). Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World. Princeton University Press. p. 56, and directory notes accompanying.
  11. ^ Lund University. Digital Atlas of the Roman Empire.

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainSmith, William, ed. (1854–1857). "Pordoselene". Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography. London: John Murray.

Coordinates: 39°20′12″N 26°39′17″E / 39.336684°N 26.654808°E

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Ayvalık (Turkish: [ˈajvaɫɯk]) is a seaside town on the northwestern Aegean coast of Turkey. It is a district of Balıkesir Province. The town center of Ayvalık is surrounded by the archipelago of Ayvalık Islands, which face the nearby Greek island of Lesbos.

It was an ancient Aeolian port-town, called Kydonies (Ancient Greek: Κυδωνίες) and it served surrounding Greek Aeolian cities, such as Pergamos; since the Ottoman era, the name of the city changed to Ayvalik, the town remained predominantly Greek, and although the Turks used its Turkish name, its Greek population used indiscrimanantly its ancient name Kydonies and its new name Hellenized to Aivali (Αϊβαλί).

Ayvalık Islands Nature Park

Ayvalık Islands (Latin: Hecatonnesi, Ancient Greek: Ἑκατόννησοι, romanized: Hekatonesoi), are the group of islands around Ayvalık district of Turkey in Balıkesir Province in the Northeastern Aegean Sea. There are 22 islands and numerous rocks in the group, with Cunda Island, now a peninsula, being the largest. People live only on Cunda and Lale Islands. Cunda and Lale islands are linked to Ayvalık on the mainland, by a causeway enabling transportation by car. Cunda also has a ferry link from the main town, Alibey, to Ayvalık during the summer.

A Greek Orthodox metropolis was established, based in Cunda island, for some months in 1922.Wild life can be observed on the other islands, especially wild rabbits on Ilyosta Island. Also, those islands are the main points of interest to tourists as having small beaches and bays.

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Büyük Maden Iland (Turkish: Büyük Maden adası, literally Big Mine Island) is an Aegean island of Turkey

The island at 39°23′N 26°35′E is a part of Ayvalık ilçe (district) of Balıkesir Province. It is between Cunda Island and Küçük Maden Island. The island currently is uninhabited. Its distance to Cunda ısland is less than 200 metres (660 ft). With an area of 3 square kilometres (1.2 sq mi) it is one of the bigger islands around Ayvalık.

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Hisarlik (Turkish: Hisarlık, "Place of Fortresses"), often spelled Hissarlik, is the modern name for an ancient city in modern day located in what is now Turkey (historically Anatolia) near to the modern city of Çanakkale. The unoccupied archaeological site lies approximately 6.5 km from the Aegean Sea and about the same distance from the Dardanelles. The archaeological site of Hisarlik is known in archaeological circles as a tell. A tell is an artificial hill, built up over centuries and millennia of occupation from its original site on a bedrock knob.

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Nasos (Ancient Greek: Νᾶσος) was a town and polis (city-state) of ancient Aeolis. The place-name "Nesos Pordoselene" (Νεσος Πορδοσελήνε) appears in the list of tributes to ancient Athens of the year 422/1 BCE but there are different opinions on whether Nesos (or Nasos) and Pordoselene were a single city or if they are two different cities. On the other hand, the nickname "nasiotas" (Νασιώτας) appears in an inscription of Adramyttium dated to 319-317 BCE.Silver and bronze coins dating from the 4th century BCE are preserved. It has been assumed that Nasos was located on the island of Alibey Adası located between Lesbos and Asia Minor.

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