Popular Science

Popular Science (also known as PopSci) is an American quarterly magazine carrying popular science content, which refers to articles for the general reader on science and technology subjects. Popular Science has won over 58 awards, including the American Society of Magazine Editors awards for its journalistic excellence in both 2003 (for General Excellence) and 2004 (for Best Magazine Section). With roots beginning in 1872,[2] Popular Science has been translated into over 30 languages and is distributed to at least 45 countries.

Popular Science
Popular Science
Cover of Popular Science, February 2014
Magazine Cover (February, 2014)
EditorJoe Brown
CategoriesInterdisciplinary
FrequencyQuarterly
PublisherBonnier Corporation
Total circulation
(June 2014)
1,321,075[1]
Year foundedMay 1872 (as The Popular Science Monthly)
CountryUnited States
Based inHarlan, Iowa, U.S.
Websitewww.popsci.com
ISSN0161-7370
OCLC number488612811

Early history

The Popular Science Monthly, as the publication was originally called, was founded in May 1872[3] by Edward L. Youmans to disseminate scientific knowledge to the educated layman. Youmans had previously worked as an editor for the weekly Appleton's Journal and persuaded them to publish his new journal. Early issues were mostly reprints of English periodicals. The journal became an outlet for writings and ideas of Charles Darwin, Thomas Henry Huxley, Louis Pasteur, Henry Ward Beecher, Charles Sanders Peirce, William James, Thomas Edison, John Dewey and James McKeen Cattell. William Jay Youmans, Edward's brother, helped found Popular Science Monthly in 1872 and was an editor as well. He became editor-in-chief on Edward's death in 1887.[4] The publisher, D. Appleton & Company, was forced for economic reasons to sell the journal in 1900.[5]

James McKeen Cattell became the editor in 1900 and the publisher in 1901. Cattell had a background in academics and continued publishing articles for educated readers. By 1915 the readership was declining and publishing a science journal was a financial challenge. In a September 1915 editorial, Cattell related these difficulties to his readers and announced that the Popular Science Monthly name had been "transferred" to a group that wanted the name for a general audience magazine, a publication which fit the name better. The existing journal would continue the academic tradition as Scientific Monthly. Existing subscribers would remain subscribed under the new name.[6] Scientific Monthly was published until 1958 when it was absorbed into Science.[7]

The Modern Publishing Company acquired the Popular Science Monthly name. This company had purchased Electrician and Mechanic magazine in 1914 and over the next two years merged several magazines together into a science magazine for a general audience. The magazine had a series of name changes: Modern Electrics and Mechanics, Popular Electricity and Modern Mechanics, Modern Mechanics and finally World's Advance, before the publishers purchased the name Popular Science Monthly. The October 1915 issue was titled Popular Science Monthly and World's Advance. The volume number (Vol. 87, No. 4) was that of Popular Science but the content was that of World's Advance. The new editor was Waldemar Kaempffert, a former editor of Scientific American.[8][9]

The change in Popular Science Monthly was dramatic. The old version was a scholarly journal that had eight to ten articles in a 100-page issue. There would be ten to twenty photographs or illustrations. The new version had hundreds of short, easy to read articles with hundreds of illustrations. Editor Kaempffert was writing for "the home craftsman and hobbyist who wanted to know something about the world of science." The circulation doubled in the first year.[5]

From the mid-1930s to the 1960s, the magazine featured fictional stories of Gus Wilson's Model Garage, centered on car problems.

An annual review of changes to the new model year cars ran in 1940 and '41, but did not return after the war until 1954. It continued until the mid-1970s when the magazine reverted to publishing the new models over multiple issues as information became available.

From 1935 to 1949, the magazine sponsored a series of short films, produced by Jerry Fairbanks and released by Paramount Pictures.

From July 1952 to December 1989, Popular Science carried Roy Doty's Wordless Workshop as a regular feature.

From July 1969 to May 1989, the cover and table of contents carried the subtitle, "The What's New Magazine." The cover removed the subtitle the following month and the contents page removed it in February 1990. In 1983, the magazine introduced a new logo using the ITC Avant Garde font, which it used until late 1995. Within the next 11 years, its font changed 4 times (in 1995, 1997, 2001, and 2002, respectively). In 2009, the magazine used a new font for its logo, which was used until the January 2014 issue.

In 2014, Popular Science sported a new look and introduced a new logo for the first time in 8 years, complete with a major overhaul of its articles.

Recent history

The Popular Science Publishing Company, which the magazine bears its name, was acquired in 1967 by the Los Angeles-based Times Mirror Company. In 2000, Times Mirror merged with the Chicago-based Tribune Company, which then sold the Times Mirror magazines to Time Inc. (then a subsidiary of Time Warner) the following year. On January 25, 2007, Time Warner sold this magazine, along with 17 other special interest magazines, to Bonnier Magazine Group.[10] On September 24, 2008, Australian publishing company Australian Media Properties (part of the WW Media Group) launched a local version of Popular Science. It is a monthly magazine, like its American counterpart, and uses content from the American version of the magazine as well as local material.[11] Australian Media Properties also launched www.popsci.com.au at the same time, a localised version of the Popular Science website.

In January 2016, Popular Science switched to bi-monthly publication after 144 years of monthly publication.[12]

In April 2016 it was announced that editor-in-chief Cliff Ransom would step down. It was also announced that he would remain on staff as an editor-at-large.[13]

In September 2018, Popular Science switched to quarterly publication, also indicating future subscription prices will be increased. [28]

Popular Science is headquartered in New York, New York.

Radio

Popular Science Radio is a partnership between Popular Science and Entertainment Radio Network.[14]

Tablet

On March 27, 2011, Popular Science magazine sold the 10,000th subscription to its iPad edition, nearly six weeks after accepting Apple's terms for selling subs on its tablet.[15]

Mobile

In August 2009, Popular Science launched a free iPhone app called PopSci.com,[16] which delivers content from their Web site. The app got a redesign and major update in November 2010. Since January 2011, Popular Science is also available on Android phones and tablets.[17]

Popular Science+

In early 2010, Bonnier partnered with London-based design firm BERG to create Mag+, a magazine publishing platform for tablets. In April 2010, Popular Science+,[18][19] the first title on the Mag+ platform, launched in the iTunes Store the same day the iPad launched.[20] The app contains all the content in the print version as well as added content and digital-only extras. Bonnier has since launched several more titles on the Mag+ platform, including Popular Photography+ and Transworld Snowboarding+.

Popular Science Predictions Exchange

In July 2007, Popular Science launched the Popular Science Predictions EXchange (PPX). People were able to place virtual bets on what the next innovations in technology, the environment, and science would be. Bets have included whether Facebook would have an initial public offering by 2008, when a touchscreen iPod would be launched, and whether Dongtan, China's eco-city, would be inhabited by 2010. The PPX shut down in 2009.

Television-Future Of...

Popular Science's Future Of...[21] show premiered on Monday, August 10, 2009 on the Science Channel. The show is concerned with the future of technology and science in a particular topic area that varies from week to week. As of December 2009, a new episode is premiered every Monday.[22]

Popular Science on Google Books

Since March 5, 2010, all Popular Science issues since the first issue of May 1872 through March 2009 (except October–December 1915 and January-June 1917) are available for free on Google Books although several 1910s/20s issues are apparently scanned from bound library volumes that had been stripped of full-page ads.[23]

Other Languages

In June 2014, Popular Science was launched in Italy by Kekoa Publishing. Directed by Francesco Maria Avitto is available in print and digital version.[24]

In April 2017, Popular Science was launched in Arabic by UAE based publisher Haykal Media. The magazine is available in print bimonthly, and through a daily updated portal.[25]

Publishers

Dates Publisher
1872–1900 D. Appleton & Company
1900–1901 McClure, Philips and Company
1901–1915 Science Press
1915–1924 Modern Publishing Company
1924–1967 Popular Science Publishing Company
1967–1973 Popular Science Publishing Company, subsidiary of Times Mirror
1973–2000 Times Mirror Company
2000–2007 Time Inc.
2007 – present Bonnier Magazine Group

Sources: American Mass-Market Magazines[5] The Wall Street Journal[26] and New York Post.[27]

Gallery

Popsci7

Ship on Stilts Rides Above Waves, January 1936, by Edgar Franklin Wittmack

Popular Science May 1949

Is U.S Building a "New Moon"?, May 1949

Popsci2

Cars Without Wheels, July 1959

References

  1. ^ "eCirc for Consumer Magazines". Alliance for Audited Media. December 31, 2012. Retrieved June 21, 2013.
  2. ^ Bruce V. Lewenstein (1987). "Was There Really a Popular Science" Boom"?". Science, Technology, & Human Values. Retrieved June 24, 2016.
  3. ^ "Top 100 U.S. Magazines by Circulation" (PDF). PSA Research Center. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  4. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg Gilman, D. C.; Peck, H. T.; Colby, F. M., eds. (1905). "Youmans, William Jay" . New International Encyclopedia (1st ed.). New York: Dodd, Mead.
  5. ^ a b c Nourie, Alan; Barbara Nourie (1990). American Mass Market Magazines. pp. 385–399. ISBN 978-0-313-25254-9.
  6. ^ Cattell, James McKeen (September 1915). "The Scientific Monthly and the Popular Science Monthly". Popular Science Monthly. 87 (3): 307–310.
  7. ^ "AAAS and the Maturing of American Science: 1941–1970". American Association for the Advancement of Science. Retrieved October 3, 2013.
  8. ^ "September's Harvest of Important Books". The New York Times. August 29, 1915. p. BR312. "The Popular Science Monthly has been bought by the Modern Publishing Company of New York City…"
  9. ^ Walter, Frank Keller (1918). Periodicals for the Small Library (2nd ed.). American Library Association. p. 24. The new Popular Science Monthly is continued from World's Advance, old version in now Scientific Monthly.
  10. ^ "Bonnier Magazine Group Buys 18 Magazines from Time Inc". Time Warner. Retrieved 2012-04-01.
  11. ^ Popular Science Launches In Australia. Archived September 29, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  12. ^ "Big Changes at Popular Science". Popular Science. Retrieved 20 January 2016.
  13. ^ "Cliff Ransom Steps Down at Popular Science - Cision". 22 April 2016.
  14. ^ Popular Science Radio
  15. ^ Nat Ives, adage.
  16. ^ "PopSci.com in iTunes". iTunes. October 26, 2011. Retrieved April 1, 2012.
  17. ^ "PopSci.com for Android". play.google. January 14, 2011. Retrieved May 8, 2012.
  18. ^ "Popular Science+ in iTunes". iTunes. February 24, 2012. Retrieved April 1, 2012.
  19. ^ Lynda Applegate; et al. (November 30, 2012). "Bonnier: Digitalizing the Media Business" (PDF). Harvard Business School. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 4, 2016. Retrieved November 1, 2016. Explicit use of et al. in: |author= (help)
  20. ^ Fell, Jason (2010-04-07). "How Popular Science Built Its App in 62 Days". Foliomag. Retrieved April 1, 2012.
  21. ^ "PopSci's "Future Of" on The Science Channel | Popular Science". Popsci. August 24, 2009. Retrieved April 1, 2012.
  22. ^ "PopSci's Future of". Science Channel. January 23, 2012. Archived from the original on September 18, 2012. Retrieved April 1, 2012.
  23. ^ Popular Science May 1872 including Browse all issues link. Google Books. Retrieved June 29, 2015.
  24. ^ "Popular Science. Sbarca in Italia il mensile di scienza e tecnologia più antico e diffuso al Mondo - Quotidiano Sanità".
  25. ^ Dubai Future Foundation April 2017
  26. ^ Rose, Matthew; Nikhil Deogun (October 20, 2000). "Time Warner to Pay $475 Million To Buy Times Mirror Magazines". The Wall Street Journal.
  27. ^ Kelly, Keith J. (January 25, 2007). "Time Warner Sells Mags Under $300m". New York Post. Archived from the original on November 22, 2008.

External links

Works related to Popular Science Monthly at Wikisource

Media related to Popular Science Monthly at Wikimedia Commons

A Short History of Nearly Everything

A Short History of Nearly Everything by American author Bill Bryson is a popular science book that explains some areas of science, using easily accessible language that appeals more so to the general public than many other books dedicated to the subject. It was one of the bestselling popular science books of 2005 in the United Kingdom, selling over 300,000 copies.A Short History deviates from Bryson's popular travel book genre, instead describing general sciences such as chemistry, paleontology, astronomy, and particle physics. In it, he explores time from the Big Bang to the discovery of quantum mechanics, via evolution and geology.

Doing DaVinci

Doing DaVinci was a popular science television program originally aired on the Discovery Channel in which the hosts attempted to create many of Leonardo da Vinci's inventions. The show aired on a weekly schedule with the first episode broadcast on April 13, 2009.

Felipe Poey

Felipe Poey (May 26, 1799 – January 28, 1891) was a Cuban zoologist.

Isaac Asimov

Isaac Asimov (; c. January 2, 1920 – April 6, 1992) was an American writer and professor of biochemistry at Boston University. He was known for his works of science fiction and popular science. Asimov was a prolific writer who wrote or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards. His books have been published in 9 of the 10 major categories of the Dewey Decimal Classification.Asimov wrote hard science fiction. Along with Robert A. Heinlein and Arthur C. Clarke, Asimov was considered one of the "Big Three" science fiction writers during his lifetime. Asimov's most famous work is the "Foundation" series; his other major series are the "Galactic Empire" series and the Robot series. The Galactic Empire novels are set in earlier history of the same fictional universe as the Foundation series. Later, with Foundation and Earth (1986), he linked this distant future to the Robot stories, creating a unified "future history" for his stories much like those pioneered by Robert A. Heinlein and previously produced by Cordwainer Smith and Poul Anderson. He also wrote hundreds of short stories, including the social science fiction novelette "Nightfall", which in 1964 was voted the best short science fiction story of all time by the Science Fiction Writers of America. Asimov wrote the Lucky Starr series of juvenile science-fiction novels using the pen name Paul French.Asimov also wrote mysteries and fantasy, as well as much nonfiction. Most of his popular science books explain concepts in a historical way, going as far back as possible to a time when the science in question was at its simplest stage. Examples include Guide to Science, the three-volume set Understanding Physics, and Asimov's Chronology of Science and Discovery. He wrote on numerous other scientific and non-scientific topics, such as chemistry, astronomy, mathematics, history, biblical exegesis, and literary criticism.

He was president of the American Humanist Association. The asteroid 5020 Asimov, a crater on the planet Mars, a Brooklyn elementary school, and a literary award are named in his honor.

Jared Diamond

Jared Mason Diamond (born September 10, 1937) is an American geographer, historian, and author best known for his popular science books The Third Chimpanzee (1991); Guns, Germs, and Steel (1997, awarded a Pulitzer Prize); Collapse (2005); and The World Until Yesterday (2012). Originally trained in physiology, Diamond is known for drawing from a variety of fields, including anthropology, ecology, geography and evolutionary biology. He is a professor of geography at UCLA.In 2005, Diamond was ranked ninth on a poll by Prospect and Foreign Policy of the world's top 100 public intellectuals.

Light-year

The light-year is a unit of length used to express astronomical distances and measures about 9.46 trillion kilometres (9.46 x 1012 km) or 5.88 trillion miles (5.88 x 1012 mi). As defined by the International Astronomical Union (IAU), a light-year is the distance that light travels in vacuum in one Julian year (365.25 days). Because it includes the word "year", the term light-year is sometimes misinterpreted as a unit of time.

The light-year is most often used when expressing distances to stars and other distances on a galactic scale, especially in nonspecialist and popular science publications. The unit most commonly used in professional astrometry is the parsec (symbol: pc, about 3.26 light-years; the distance at which one astronomical unit subtends an angle of one second of arc).

List of aircraft

This list of aircraft is sorted alphabetically, beginning with the name of the manufacturer (or, in certain cases, designer). It is an inclusive list rather than an exclusive one, meaning that where an aircraft is known under multiple names, designations, or manufacturers, each of these is listed. Note also that this list should not be considered complete and it is constantly being updated with more aircraft types.

This list does not generally include variants or subtypes of the aircraft themselves (although there is considerable difference among various manufacturers and designation systems as to what constitutes a new aircraft as opposed to a variant of an existing type).

List of science magazines

A science magazine is a periodical publication with news, opinions and reports about science, generally written for a non-expert audience. In contrast, a periodical publication, usually including primary research and/or reviews, that is written by scientific experts is called a "scientific journal". Science magazines are read by non-scientists and scientists who want accessible information on fields outside their specialization.

Articles in science magazines are sometimes republished or summarized by the general press.

Mid-size car

A mid-size car— also known as intermediate— is a vehicle size class which originated in the United States and is used for cars that are larger than compact cars, but smaller than full-size cars. The equivalent European category is D-segment, which is also called "large family car". Mid-size cars are manufactured in a variety of body styles, including sedans, coupes, station wagons, hatchbacks and convertibles.

New Scientist

New Scientist, first published on 22 November 1956, is a weekly, English-language magazine that covers all aspects of science and technology. New Scientist, based in London, publishes editions in the UK, the United States, and Australia. Since 1996 it has been available online.

Sold in retail outlets (paper edition) and on subscription (paper and/or online), the magazine covers news, features, reviews and commentary on science, technology and their implications. New Scientist also publishes speculative articles, ranging from the technical to the philosophical.

Nova (TV series)

Nova (stylized NOVΛ) is an American popular science television series produced by WGBH Boston. It is broadcast on PBS in the U.S., and in more than 100 other countries. The series has won many major television awards.Nova often includes interviews with scientists doing research in the subject areas covered and occasionally includes footage of a particular discovery. Some episodes have focused on the history of science. Examples of topics covered include the following:

Colditz Castle,

Drake equation,

elementary particles,

1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens,

Fermat's Last Theorem,

AIDS epidemic,

global warming,

moissanite,

Project Jennifer,

storm chasing,

Unterseeboot 869,

Vinland, and the

Tarim mummies.

The Nova programs have been praised for their good pacing, clear writing, and crisp editing. Websites accompany the segments and have also won awards.

Popular Mechanics

Popular Mechanics (sometimes PM or PopMech) is a magazine of popular science and technology, featuring automotive, home, outdoor, electronics, science, do-it-yourself, and technology topics. Military topics, aviation and transportation of all types, space, tools and gadgets are commonly featured.It was founded in 1902 by Henry Haven Windsor, who was the editor and—as owner of the Popular Mechanics Company—the publisher. For decades, the tagline of the monthly magazine was "Written so you can understand it." In 1958, PM was purchased by the Hearst Corporation, now Hearst Communications.In 2013, the US edition changed from twelve to ten issues per year, and in 2014 the tagline was changed to "How your world works." The magazine added a podcast in recent years, including regular features Most Useful Podcast Ever and How Your World Works.

Science Illustrated

Science Illustrated is a multilingual popular science magazine published by Bonnier Publications International A/S.

Science book

A science book is a work of nonfiction, usually written by a scientist, researcher, or professor like Stephen Hawking (A Brief History of Time), or sometimes by a non-scientist such as Bill Bryson (A Short History of Nearly Everything). Usually these books are written for a wide audience presumed to have a general education rather than a specifically scientific training, as opposed to the very narrow audience that a scientific paper would have, and are therefore referred to as popular science. As such, they require considerable talent on the part of the author to sufficiently explain difficult topics to

people who are totally new to the subject, and a good blend of storytelling and technical writing. In the UK, the Royal Society Prizes for Science Books are considered to be the most prestigious awards for science writing. In the US, the National Book Awards briefly had a category for science writing in the 1960s, but now they just have the broad categories of fiction and nonfiction.

There are many disciplines that are well explained to lay people through science books. A few examples include Carl Sagan on astronomy, Jared Diamond on geography, Stephen Jay Gould and Richard Dawkins on evolutionary biology, David Eagleman on neuroscience, Donald Norman on usability and cognitive psychology, Steven Pinker, Noam Chomsky, and Robert Ornstein on linguistics and cognitive science, Donald Johanson and Robert Ardrey on paleoanthropology, and Desmond Morris on zoology and anthropology, and Fulvio Melia on black holes.

Scientific American

Scientific American (informally abbreviated SciAm or sometimes SA) is an American popular science magazine. Many famous scientists, including Albert Einstein, have contributed articles to it. It is the oldest continuously published monthly magazine in the United States (though it only became monthly in 1921).

Scientific American Mind

Scientific American Mind is a bimonthly American popular science magazine concentrating on psychology, neuroscience, and related fields. By analyzing and revealing new thinking in the cognitive sciences, the magazine tries to focus on the biggest breakthroughs in these fields. Scientific American Mind is published by Nature Publishing Group which also publishes Scientific American and was established in 2004. The magazine has its headquarters in New York City.The May/June 2017 issue was the last issue published in print, subsequent issues are available through digital platforms.

The Blind Watchmaker

The Blind Watchmaker: Why the Evidence of Evolution Reveals a Universe without Design is a 1986 book by Richard Dawkins, in which the author presents an explanation of, and argument for, the theory of evolution by means of natural selection. He also presents arguments to refute certain criticisms made on his first book, The Selfish Gene. (Both books espouse the gene-centric view of evolution.) An unabridged audiobook edition was released in 2011, narrated by Richard Dawkins and Lalla Ward.

Thistle

Thistle is the common name of a group of flowering plants characterised by leaves with sharp prickles on the margins, mostly in the family Asteraceae. Prickles occur all over the plant – on the stem and flat parts of leaves. They are an adaptation that protects the plant from being eaten by herbivores. Typically, an involucre with a clasping shape of a cup or urn subtends each of a thistle's flowerheads.

The term thistle is sometimes taken to mean exactly those plants in the tribe Cardueae (synonym: Cynareae), especially the genera Carduus, Cirsium, and Onopordum. However, plants outside this tribe are sometimes called thistles, and if this is done thistles would form a polyphyletic group.

A thistle is the floral emblem of Lorraine and Scotland, as well as the emblem of the Encyclopædia Britannica.

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See also

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