Pope Valentine

Pope Valentine (in Latin: Valentinus; d. 10 October 827) was Pope for two months in 827.

Pope

Valentine
Valentine
Papacy beganc. 31 August 827
Papacy endedc. 10 October 827
PredecessorEugene II
SuccessorGregory IV
Personal details
BornRome, Papal States
Died10 October 827
Rome, Papal States

Biography

Born in Rome in the region of the Via Lata, Valentine was the son of a Roman noble called Leontius.[1] Showing an early aptitude for learning, he was moved from the school attached to the Lateran Palace and, according to the Liber Pontificalis, was made a Deacon by Pope Paschal I (817–824).[2] His biographer in the Liber pontificalis praises his piety and purity of morals, which won him the favor of Paschal I, who raised him to the rank of Archdeacon.[3] He also was clearly favoured by Paschal’s successor, Pope Eugenius II, to the point where rumours were circulated that Valentine was really the son of Eugenius. According to Louis-Marie DeCormenin, other rumours declared that Valentine and Eugenius were involved in an illicit relationship.[4]

With the death of Eugenius, the Roman clergy, nobility and people all acclaimed Valentine as being the most worthy to occupy the Apostolic See. They took him from the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore, and installed him in the Lateran Palace, ignoring his protests. In their haste, they enthroned him before he was consecrated a priest; this was an unusual reversal of the normal proceedings, and in fact was the first time it had happened in the recorded history of the papacy, although it would be repeated during the pontificate of Pope Benedict III.[5] On the following Sunday, he was formally consecrated bishop at St. Peter's Basilica. There were no imperial representatives present during the election, and Valentine had no opportunity to ratify his election with the emperor, as he was dead within five weeks, dying on 10 October 827.[6][7]

The election of Valentine was another sign of the increased influence the Roman nobility was having in the papal electoral process. Not only had they managed to get one of their own elected, but they also took part in the election itself. The Lateran Council of 769, under Pope Stephen III, had mandated that the election of the pope was to be the responsibility of the Roman clergy only, and that the nobility could only offer their respects after the pope had been chosen and enthroned. This gradual encroachment into the papal electoral process would reach its nadir during the tenth century, when the papacy became the plaything of the Roman aristocracy.[8]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Mann, pgs. 183–184
  2. ^ Mann, pg. 184
  3. ^ Kirsch, Johann Peter. "Pope Valentine." The Catholic Encyclopedia Vol. 15. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1912. 20 September 2017
  4. ^ DeCormenin, pgs. 217–218
  5. ^ Mann, pgs. 184–185
  6. ^ Mann, pgs. 185–186
  7. ^ DeCormenin, pg. 218
  8. ^ Mann, pg. 185

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Pope Valentine". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton.

References

  • Mann, Horace K., The Lives of the Popes in the Early Middle Ages, Vol. II: The Popes During the Carolingian Empire, 795–858 (1906)
  • DeCormenin, Louis Marie; Gihon, James L., A Complete History of the Popes of Rome, from Saint Peter, the First Bishop to Pius the Ninth (1857)

External links

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Eugene II
Pope
827
Succeeded by
Gregory IV
820s

The 820s decade ran from January 1, 820, to December 31, 829.

827

Year 827 (DCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Lateran Council (769)

The Lateran Council of 769 was a synod held in the Basilica of St. John Lateran to rectify perceived abuses in the papal electoral process which had led to the elevation of the Antipopes Constantine II and Philip. It also condemned the rulings of the Council of Hieria. It is perhaps the most important Roman council held during the 8th century.

List of popes by country

This page is a list of popes by country of origin. They are listed in chronological order within each section.

As the office of pope has existed for almost two millennia, many of the countries of origin of popes no longer exist, and so they are grouped under their modern equivalents. Popes from Italy are in a separate section, given the very large number of popes from that peninsula.

October 10

October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. 82 days remain until the end of the year.

Valentine

A valentine is a card or gift given on Valentine's Day, or one's sweetheart and may refer to:

Valentine (name), a given name and surname (and list of people and fictional characters with the name)

Valentine (name)

Valentine is a unisex given name derived from the Roman family name Valentinus, which was derived from the Latin word valens, which means "strong and healthy." Valentine was the name of several saints of the Roman Catholic Church. St. Valentine's Day was named for a third-century martyr. The usual feminine form of the name is Valentina.

Via Lata

Via Lata (Latin - broad road) may mean one of two ancient Roman roads:

The Via Lata (Rome), now known as the Via del Corso, another name for the Via Flaminia once it has entered the city through the Porta del Popolo, in Rome.

The Via Lata (Spain), now known as the Via de la Plata, in SpainVia Lata (Rome) was the birth place of Pope Valentine in 800 A.D.

Year of three popes

A year of three popes is a common reference to a year when the College of Cardinals of the Catholic Church are required to elect two new popes within the same calendar year. Such a year generally occurs when a newly elected pope dies or resigns very early into his papacy. This results in the Catholic Church being led by three different popes during the same calendar year.

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