Pope Sisinnius

Pope Sisinnius (c. 650 – 4 February 708) was Pope from 15 January to his death in 708.[1]

A Syrian by birth,[2] Sisinnius' father's name was John.[1] The paucity of donations to the papacy during his reign (42 pounds of gold and 310 pounds of silver, a fraction of the personal donations of other contemporary pontiffs) indicate that he was probably not from the aristocracy.[3]

Sisinnius was selected as pope during the Byzantine Papacy. He succeeded Pope John VII after a sede vacante of three months.[4] He was consecrated around 15 January 708.[1]

Sisinnius remained pope for just twenty days.[4] According to the Catholic Encyclopedia, "although he was so afflicted with gout that he was unable even to feed himself, he is nevertheless said to have been a man of strong character, and to have been able to take thought for the good of the city".[1] Among his few acts as pope was the consecration of a bishop for Corsica.[1] He also ordered "that lime be burned in order to restore portions" of the walls of Rome.[5] The restoration of the walls planned by Sisinnius was carried out by Pope Gregory II.[6]

Sisinnius was buried in Old St. Peter's Basilica.[1] He was succeeded less than two months later by Pope Constantine.[4] Constantine, also Syrian by birth, was probably the brother of Sisinnius.[7]

Pope

Sisinnius
Sisinnius
Papacy began15 January 708
Papacy ended4 February 708
PredecessorJohn VII
SuccessorConstantine
Personal details
Born650
Syria, Rashidun Caliphate
Died4 February 708
Rome, Byzantine Empire

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f Wikisource-logo.svg Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Pope Sisinnius" . Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  2. ^ Joseph S. Brusher, Popes through the Ages, (Neff-Kane, 1980), 174.
  3. ^ Jeffrey Richards. 1979. The popes and the papacy in the early Middle Ages, 476–752. p. 245.
  4. ^ a b c Ekonomou, 2007, p. 246.
  5. ^ Ekonomou, 2007, p. 248.
  6. ^ Charles Isidore Hemans. 1874. Historic and monumental Rome. p. 100.
  7. ^ *Williams, George L. 2004. Papal Genealogy: The Families and Descendants of the Popes. McFarland. ISBN 0-7864-2071-5. p. 10.

References

  • Ekonomou, Andrew J. 2007. Byzantine Rome and the Greek Popes: Eastern influences on Rome and the papacy from Gregory the Great to Zacharias, A.D. 590–752. Lexington Books.
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
John VII
Pope
708
Succeeded by
Constantine
700s (decade)

The 700s decade ran from January 1, 700, to December 31, 709.

708

Year 708 (DCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 708 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Byzantine Papacy

The Byzantine Papacy was a period of Byzantine domination of the Roman papacy from 537 to 752, when popes required the approval of the Byzantine Emperor for episcopal consecration, and many popes were chosen from the apocrisiarii (liaisons from the pope to the emperor) or the inhabitants of Byzantine-ruled Greece, Syria, or Sicily. Justinian I conquered the Italian peninsula in the Gothic War (535–554) and appointed the next three popes, a practice that would be continued by his successors and later be delegated to the Exarchate of Ravenna.

With the exception of Pope Martin I, no pope during this period questioned the authority of the Byzantine monarch to confirm the election of the bishop of Rome before consecration could occur; however, theological conflicts were common between pope and emperor in the areas such as monothelitism and iconoclasm.

Greek-speakers from Greece, Syria, and Sicily replaced members of the powerful Roman nobles in the papal chair during this period. Rome under the Greek popes constituted a "melting pot" of Western and Eastern Christian traditions, reflected in art as well as liturgy.

Diocese of Aleria

The Diocese of Aleria (Latin Dioecesis Aleriensis) was a Roman Catholic diocese of the Latin rite, in the center of the eastern coast of the island of Corsica in the Department of Haute-Corse. The town of Aleria was subject to repeated raids by Arab fleets in the eighth and ninth centuries, and eventually abandoned, many of its people fleeing to the mainland. The bishop moved to a secure stronghold to the north. From at least the eleventh century, the diocese was a suffragan of the metropolitan archdiocese of Pisa. The diocese was suppressed by the Civil Constitution of the Clergy in 1790, and was not revived after the Concordat of 1801 between the French Consulate and the Papacy. It has been a titular diocese since 2002.

February 4

February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 330 days remain until the end of the year (331 in leap years).

This day marks the approximate midpoint of winter in the Northern Hemisphere and of summer in the Southern Hemisphere (starting the season at the December solstice).

List of Lebanese people

This is a list of notable individuals born and residing mainly in Lebanon.

Lebanese expatriates residing overseas and possessing Lebanese citizenship are also included.

For people of Lebanese descent, see Lists of Lebanese diaspora.

List of popes by country

This page is a list of popes by country of origin. They are listed in chronological order within each section.

As the office of pope has existed for almost two millennia, many of the countries of origin of popes no longer exist, and so they are grouped under their modern equivalents. Popes from Italy are in a separate section, given the very large number of popes from that peninsula.

List of shortest-reigning monarchs

A monarch is the person who heads a monarchy, usually reigning for life, or until abdication or deposition. The reign of some monarchs has been notably short. Many of these monarchs acceded to the throne as a result of being first in an order of succession, while other monarchs claimed the throne as a result of some conflict.

The authenticity of some monarchs has been disputed, especially those who reigned during conflict. One factor in such debates is whether the monarch held the throne in a symbolic or nominal capacity. Two examples are

King Louis XIX of France, who succeeded upon the abdication of Charles X only to abdicate in favour of Henry V instead of assuming the throne, and

Emperor Michael II of Russia, who succeeded on the abdication of Nicholas II only to abdicate himself in favor of nobody.

March 25

March 25 is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. 281 days remain until the end of the year.

Pope Constantine

Pope Constantine (Latin: Constantinus; 664 – 9 April 715) was Pope from 25 March 708 to his death in 715. With the exception of Antipope Constantine, he was the only pope to take such a "quintessentially" Eastern name of an emperor. During this period, the regnal name was also used by emperors and patriarchs.

Selected as one of the last popes of the Byzantine Papacy, the defining moment of Constantine's pontificate was his 710/711 visit to Constantinople where he compromised with Justinian II on the Trullan canons of the Quinisext Council. Constantine was the last pope to visit Constantinople until Pope Paul VI did in 1967.

Sisinnius

Sisinnius (Greek: Σισίννιος, Sisinnios, also Sissinnios) may refer to:

Pope Sisinnius, Pope for about three weeks in 708

Sisinnius I of Constantinople, Archbishop of Constantinople from 426 to 427

Sisinnius II of Constantinople, Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from 996 to 998

Saint Sisinnius, one of the martyred missionaries sent by Saint Vigilius of Trent

Saint Sisinnius of Parthia, depicted in "holy rider" charms of the Byzantine Period; see Gello

Susenyos I, Emperor of Ethiopia from 1608 to 1632

Susenyos II, Emperor of Ethiopia for about four months in 1770

Syrians

Syrians (Arabic: سوريون‎), also known as the Syrian people (Arabic: الشعب السوري‎, ALA-LC: al-sha‘ab al-Sūrī; Syriac: ܣܘܪܝܝܢ‎), are the majority inhabitants of Syria, who share a common Levantine Semitic ancestry. The cultural and linguistic heritage of the Syrian people is a blend of both indigenous elements and the foreign cultures that have come to rule the land and its people over the course of thousands of years.

The Syrian Arab Republic has a population of 19.5 million as of 2018, in addition to 6 million Syrian refugees abroad, which includes minorities such as Kurds and others. The dominant racial group are the Syrian descendants of the old indigenous peoples who mixed with Arabs and identify themselves as such in addition to ethnic Arameans.

The Syrian diaspora consists of 15 million people of Syrian ancestry who immigrated to North America (United States and Canada), European Union member states (including Sweden, France and Germany), South America (mainly in Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Venezuela and Colombia), the West Indies, Africa and Australia.

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