Pope John I

Pope John I can also refer to Pope John (Talaia) I of Alexandria.
Pope John I can also refer to Pope John I (II) of Alexandria.
Pope Saint

John I
Papa Ioannes I
Papacy began13 August 523
Papacy ended18 May 526
PredecessorHormisdas
SuccessorFelix IV
Orders
Created cardinalca. 495
by Gelasius II
RankPriest
Personal details
BornTuscany
Died18 May 526
Ravenna, Ostrogothic Kingdom
Previous post
Sainthood
Feast day18 May
Other popes named John

Pope John I (Latin: Ioannes I; d. 18 May 526) was Pope from 13 August 523 to his death in 526.[1] He was a native of Siena (or the "Castello di Serena", near Chiusdino), in Italy. He was sent on a diplomatic mission to Constantinople by the Ostrogoth King Theoderic to negotiate better treatment for Arians. Although relatively successful, upon his return to Ravenna, Theoderic had the Pope imprisoned for allegedly conspiring with Constantinople. The frail pope died of neglect and ill-treatment.

Biography

While a deacon in Rome, he is known to have been a partisan of the Antipope Laurentius, for in a libellus written to Pope Symmachus in 506, John confessed his error in opposing him, condemned Peter of Altinum and Laurentius, and begged pardon of Symmachus. He would then be the "Deacon John" who signed the acta (ecclesiastic publication) of the Roman synod of 499 and 502; the fact the Roman church only had seven deacons at the time makes identifying him with this person very likely.[2] He may also be the "Deacon John" to whom Boethius, the 6th-Century philosopher, dedicated three of his five religious tractates, or treatises, written between 512 and 520.[3]

John was very frail when he was elected to the papacy as Pope John I. Despite his protests, Pope John was sent by the Arian King Theoderic the Great—ruler of the Ostrogoths, a kingdom in present-day Italy—to Constantinople to secure the moderation of a decree, issued in 523, of Emperor Justin, ruler of the Byzantine, or East Roman Empire, against the Arians. King Theoderic threatened that if John should fail in his mission, there would be reprisals against the orthodox, or non-Arian, Catholics in the West. John proceeded to Constantinople with a considerable entourage: his religious companions included Bishop Ecclesius of Ravenna, Bishop Eusebius of Fanum Fortunae, and Sabinus of Campania.[4] His secular companions were the senators Flavius Theodorus, Inportunus, and the Patrician Agapitus.[5]

Emperor Justin is recorded as receiving John honorably and promised to do everything the embassy asked of him, with the exception that those converting from Arianism to Catholicism would not be "restored" (i.e., allowed to retain their place in the Catholic hierarchy as deacons, priests, or bishops).[6] Although John was successful in his mission, when he returned to Ravenna, Theoderic's capital in Italy, Theoderic had John arrested on the suspicion of having conspired with Emperor Justin. John was imprisoned at Ravenna, where he died of neglect and ill treatment. His body was transported to Rome and buried in the Basilica of St. Peter.

The Liber Pontificalis credits John with making repairs to the cemetery of the martyrs Nereus and Achilleus on the Via Ardeatina, that of Saints Felix and Adauctus, and the cemetery of Priscilla.[7]

Pope John I is depicted in art as looking through the bars of a prison or imprisoned with a deacon and a subdeacon. He is venerated at Ravenna and in Tuscany. His feast day is 18 May, the anniversary of the day of his death (whereas it had formerly been 27 May).[8]

See also

References

  1. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Pope St. John I" . Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  2. ^ John Moorhead, "The Last Years of Theoderic", Historia: Zeitschrift für Alte Geschichte, 32 (1983), p. 113
  3. ^ This identification was first proposed by E.K. Rand in 1928, and recently defended by Moorhead, "Last years", p. 113
  4. ^ Anonymus Valesianus, 15.90; translated by J.C. Rolfe, Ammianus Marcellinus (Harvard: Loeb Classical Library, 1972), vol. 3 p. 565
  5. ^ Raymond Davis (translator), The Book of Pontiffs (Liber Pontificalis), first edition (Liverpool: University of Liverpool Press, 1989), p. 49
  6. ^ Anonymus Valesianus, 15.91; translated by J.C. Rolfe, vol. 3 p. 565
  7. ^ Raymond Davis, The Book of Pontiffs (Liber Pontificalis), p. 50
  8. ^ Patron Saints Index: Archived 2009-05-21 at the Wayback Machine "Pope Saint John I" (last accessed 23 October 2011)

External links

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Hormisdas
Pope
523–526
Succeeded by
Felix IV
470

Year 470 (CDLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Severus and Iordanes (or, less frequently, year 1223 Ab urbe condita). The denomination 470 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

520s

The 520s decade ran from January 1, 520, to December 31, 529.

== Events ==

=== 520 ===

==== By place ====

====== Byzantine Empire ======

Priscian, Latin grammarian, writes the Institutiones Grammaticae ("Grammatical Foundations"). In Constantinople, he codifies this manuscript in 18 volumes that will be widely used through the Middle Ages. It provides the raw material for the field of speculative grammar.

July – Vitalian, Byzantine general, becomes consul and is shortly later murdered, probably on the orders of Justinian. He is the nephew and heir-apparent of emperor Justin I.

====== Britannia ======

King Pabo Post Prydain of the Pennines (Northern England) abdicates his throne and divides the kingdom between his two sons. He retires, as a hermit, to Anglesey.

The Kingdom of East Anglia is formed, by the merging of the English counties of Norfolk and Suffolk and perhaps the eastern part of The Fens (approximate date).

King Budic II returns to Cornouaille (Brittany) to claim the Breton throne (approximate date).

====== Europe ======

The Ostrogothic ruler Theodoric the Great builds the Mausoleum of Theodoric as his future tomb in Ravenna (Italy).

====== Asia ======

Bodhidharma, Buddhist monk, arrives in Luoyang. He spreads Buddhism and travels to the northern Chinese kingdom of Wei to the Shaolin Monastery.

==== By topic ====

====== Religion ======

February 25 – Epiphanius is elected patriarch of Constantinople by the Byzantine emperor Justin I.

The construction of the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, is started (approximate date).

=== 521 ===

==== By place ====

====== Byzantine Empire ======

Future Byzantine emperor Justinian, age 39, is appointed consul. He later becomes Commander-in-chief of the army of the East.

====== Arabia ======

Ma`adikarib Ya`fur becomes king, supported by the Aksumites; he begins a military campaign against the Arabian tribes.

==== By topic ====

====== Music ======

Boethius introduces Greek musical letter notation to the West.

====== Religion ======

February 22 – Samson of Dol is ordained as bishop in Brittany, on the Feast of the Chair of Saint Peter.

Ecclesius becomes a bishop of Ravenna.

=== 522 ===

==== By place ====

====== Europe ======

Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius, Roman philosopher, is arrested on charges of having conspired against Theodoric the Great. He is imprisoned at Pavia (Lombardy).

Amalaric, age 20, is proclaimed king of the Visigoths. His kingdom is threatened from the north by the Burgundians.

====== Arabia ======

Dhu Nuwas seizes the throne of the Himyarite Kingdom in Yemen. He attacks the Aksumite garrison at Zafar, capturing the city and burning the churches.

Dhū Nuwas moves to Najran, an Aksumite stronghold. After accepting the city's capitulation, he massacres the Christian inhabitants (some sources estimate a death toll up to 20,000).

=== 523 ===

==== By place ====

====== Byzantine Empire ======

Justinian, later Byzantine emperor, marries in Constantinople his mistress Theodora, who is by profession a courtesan (approximate date).

====== Europe ======

King Chlothar I takes part in an expedition against Burgundy and captures the town of Autun. Now about 26, he makes plans to expand the territory he inherited from his late father, Clovis I.

King Sigismund of Burgundy is defeated by the invading Franks under Chlodomer, Childebert I and Chlothar I. He is captured and taken as prisoner to Aurelianum (modern Orléans).

====== Africa ======

Hilderic succeeds his uncle Thrasamund after a 27-year reign, and becomes king of the Vandals and Alans. He favours Catholicism and grants the inhabitants religious freedom.

Leptis Magna (modern Libya) is sacked by Berber (Moors) raiders. Gelimer leads a successful expedition in North Africa.

====== Asia ======

A revolt breaks out on the Six Frontier Towns, on the northern border of Northern Wei China ("Revolt of the Six Garrisons"). Tensions between the elite and the Tuoba-clan severely destabilise the state.

The Songyue Pagoda is completed during the Northern Wei era; the circular-based tower is still 40 m (131 ft) in height.

Seong becomes king of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

==== By topic ====

====== Religion ======

August 6 – Pope Hormisdas dies at Rome after a 9-year reign, in which he has been instrumental in ending the Acacian Schism. He is succeeded by John I as the 53rd pope.

=== 524 ===

==== By place ====

====== Europe ======

May 1 – King Sigismund of Burgundy is executed at Orléans after an 8-year reign, and is succeeded by his brother Godomar. He rallies the Burgundian army and begins plundering Frankish territory.

June 25 – Battle of Vézeronce: The Franks under Chlodomer, Childebert I and Chlothar I are defeated by the Burgundians and allied Ostrogoths near Isère (France). During the fighting Chlodomer is killed. Later Childebert annexes the cities of Chartres and Orléans.

Queen Guntheuc, widow of Chlodomer, is forced into marrying Chlothar I. Her two children are murdered by him, but the eldest son Clodoald survives by escaping to Provence.

Boethius, Roman philosopher, is executed without trial, probably at Pavia, after a prison term during which he has written The Consolation of Philosophy (approximate date).

====== Mesoamerica ======

November 29 – Ahkal Mo' Naab' I, ruler of the Maya city of Palenque, dies. The city enters an interregnum which lasts a little over four years.

=== 525 ===

==== By place ====

====== Byzantine Empire ======

Emperor Justin I rebuilds the city of Anazarbus (modern Turkey) and renames it "Justinopolis".

====== Britannia ======

Bernicia (North East England) is settled by the Angles (approximate date).

====== Europe ======

King Theodoric the Great sends Pope John I to Constantinople, to negotiate a withdrawal of Byzantine emperor Justin's edict against Arian Christianity.

Frankish tribesmen, under the command of King Chlothar I, plunder Burgundy.

====== Africa ======

Kaleb, king of Aksum, collects a fleet and crosses from Africa to conquer Yemen. He establishes better trade ports on the Red Sea.

====== Asia ======

The Daisan river, tributary of the Euphrates, floods Edessa, and within a couple of hours fills the entire city, except for the highest parts. Eventually the pent-up waters break through the city walls. The Shroud of Turin is allegedly discovered during the rebuilding of the city (see Image of Edessa).

==== By topic ====

====== Exploration and colonization ======

Cosmas Indicopleustes, Alexandrian explorer-geographer, travels up the Nile. He will venture as far to the east as Ceylon, become a monk, and write "Topographia Christiana" to vindicate the biblical account of the world (see 550).

====== Religion ======

Dionysius Exiguus, Scythian theologian-mathematician, inaugurates at Rome the practice of using A.D. (Anno Domini) for calendar dates after the birth of Jesus Christ (who was actually born in 7 B.C. or later). Dionysius produces also his tables for computing the date of "Cyclus Paschalis" (Easter Tables).

The Arian baptistery of Santa Maria is built in Ripa (Rome).

Buddhist caves are found at Ajanta (India) with stone carvings (approximate date).

=== 526 ===

==== By place ====

====== Europe ======

August 30 – King Theodoric the Great dies of dysentery at Ravenna; his daughter Amalasuntha takes power as regent for her 10-year-old son Athalaric.

Amalasuntha rules the Ostrogothic Kingdom that extends throughout the Italian Peninsula, Sicily, Illyricum (modern Dalmatia), Corsica and Sardinia.

Amalaric, age 24, becomes king of the Visigoths and assumes full royal power.

====== Persia ======

Roman–Persian Wars: King Kavad I, assisted by his Arabian vassal, Al-Mundhir III, begins a campaign in the Transcaucasus region and Upper Mesopotamia.

====== Middle East ======

Probably between May 20 and May 29 – 526 Antioch earthquake: A great earthquake kills approximately 250,000 people in Syria and Antioch.

==== By topic ====

====== Religion ======

Pope John I returns to Ravenna from Constantinople. Theodoric the Great finds that he has been only partly successful in persuading the Byzantine emperor Justin I to withdraw his edict against Arian Christianity, and throws the pope into prison.

May 18 – John I dies of starvation after a 3-year reign. Theodoric the Great selects Pope Felix IV as the 54th pope.

Ecclesius, bishop of Ravenna, commissions two new churches, one for Ravenna and one for its port, Classis.

c. 526–547 – Sanctuary apse's mosaic showing Christ enthroned and flanked by Saint Vitalis and Ecclesius, Basilica of San Vitale (Ravenna) is made.

=== 527 ===

==== By place ====

====== Byzantine Empire ======

April 1 – Emperor Justin I names his nephew Justinian I as co-ruler, as an incurable wound saps his strength.

August 1 – Justin I, age 77, dies at Constantinople and is succeeded by Justinian I, who becomes sole emperor.

Justinian I reorganises the command structure of the Byzantine army, and fields a small but highly trained army.

Justinian I appoints Belisarius to command the Eastern army in Armenia and on the Byzantine-Persian frontier.

====== Britannia ======

King Cerdic of Wessex and his son Cynric defeat the Britons at Cerdicesleah (modern Chearsley).

The Kingdom of Essex is founded by the Saxons, who land north of the Thames. They take control of the land between what is now London and St Albans.

Æscwine becomes the first king of Essex (approximate date).

====== Japan ======

Iwai Rebellion: A revolt against the Yamato court breaks out in Tsukushi Province (according to Nihon Shoki).

==== By topic ====

====== Religion ======

Justinian I outlaws pagan religious practices in Egypt, and dispatches Byzantine missionaries to southern territories (approximate date).

The Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem is rebuilt until 565, restoring the architectural tone of the basilica.

Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, formally adopts Buddhism as a state religion (approximate date).

=== 528 ===

==== By place ====

====== Byzantine Empire ======

February 13 – Emperor Justinian I appoints a commission (including the jurist Tribonian) to codify all laws of the Roman Empire that are still in force from Hadrian to the current date; this becomes the Corpus Juris Civilis.

November 29 – Natural disaster: A second great earthquake strikes Antioch, killing thousands (including Patriarch Euphrasius), and causing a fire that destroys the Domus Aurea (Great Church) built by Constantine the Great.

Justin, Byzantine general (magister militum), dies in battle against the Bulgars on the frontier of the Danubian limes in Moesia. He is succeeded by Constantiolus.

====== Asia ======

March 31 – Emperor Xiaoming of Northern Wei, emperor of Northern Wei, is poisoned by order of his mother, the regent Empress Dowager Hu.

April 1 – The 6-week-old only daughter of Emperor Xiaoming of Northern Wei is proclaimed empress regnant of Northern Wei, by Empress Dowager Hu.

April 2 – Xiaoming's daughter is replaced by the 2- or 3-year-old Yuan Zhao as emperor of Northern Wei, by order of Empress Dowager Hu

May 17 – Empress Dowager Hu, regent of Northern Wei, having resorted to an old monarchist tool and executed lovers who have displeased her, is drowned in the Yellow River along with the nominal emperor, the baby Yuan Zhao, and prince Yuan Yong by order of General Erzhu Rong, who places 21-year-old Yuan Ziyou on the throne as Emperor Xiaozhuang of Northern Wei.

The Hephthalites (White Huns) move from the Hindu Kush into the Punjab region, and eastward across the Ganges Delta, ravaging cities and Buddhist monasteries.

Yasodharman, Maharaja ("great king") of Malwa, defeats the Hun invaders under Mihirakula in central India.

==== By topic ====

====== Religion ======

King Seong of Baekje adopts Buddhism as the state religion.

Bulguksa, a Buddhist temple, is built in South Korea.

=== 529 ===

==== By place ====

====== Byzantine Empire ======

April 7 – Emperor Justinian I issues the Codex Justinianus (Code of Civil Laws), reformulating Roman law in an effort to control his unruly people (see 532).

The Samaritans revolt and are defeated; the Church of the Nativity is burnt down during the Rebellion.

====== Europe ======

Queen Amalasuntha receives a delegation sent by a council of Gothic nobles urging that she have her son Athalaric, now 13, taught an education in the Roman tradition not by elderly schoolmasters, but by men who will teach him to "ride, fence, and to be toughened, not to be turned into a bookworm".

====== Arabia ======

Al-Harith ibn Jabalah becomes the fifth king of the Ghassanids. He helps the Byzantines to suppress the wide-scale Samaritan Revolt.

====== Mesoamerica ======

February 25 – K'an Joy Chitam I comes to power in the Maya city of Palenque, ending an interregnum of a little over four years.

====== Southeast Asia ======

Rudravarman is granted investiture by China, as the first king of the fourth dynasty of Champa (modern Vietnam).

==== By topic ====

====== Education ======

The Academy founded at Athens by Plato, in about 387 BC, closes down by order of Justinian I, on charges of un-Christian activity. Many of the school's professors emigrate to Persia and Syria.

====== Religion ======

The Benedictine Order is established at Monte Cassino near Naples by Benedict of Nursia, who founds a monastery and formulates for his monks strict rules in the "Regula Benedicti".

The Canons of the Council of Orange are established, approving the Augustinian doctrine of sin and grace over Pelagianism and Semi-Pelagianism, but without Augustine's absolute predestination.

525

Year 525 (DXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Probus and Philoxenus (or, less frequently, year 1278 Ab urbe condita). The denomination 525 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. In this year, the monk Dionysius Exiguus proposed a calendar starting with the birth of Jesus (the AD system), so this was the first time the year was designated AD. However, the system was not used in general until the reign of Charlemagne in the 9th century.

526

Year 526 (DXXVI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Olybrius without colleague (or, less frequently, year 1279 Ab urbe condita). The denomination 526 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Agapitus (consul 517)

Flavius Agapitus (floruit 502–523) was a Roman politician during the reign of Theodoric the Great. He held the consulship with Flavius Anastasius Paulus Probus Sabinianus Pompeius Anastasius as his colleague in 517.He started his public career late in life, having lived in seclusion in Liguria, where Ennodius made his acquaintance. Ennodius helped Agapitus obtain a high position at the court of Theodoric the Great in 502, and subsequently was appointed urban prefect of Rome. His Prefecture is mentioned in a legal document from the time of Theodoric. During his tenure as urban prefect, or shortly afterwards, he was made Patrician and settled many cases affecting the Senate. Ennodius comments that he had achieved a favorable reputation in the Senate, which possibly led to his appointment as consul.

In 523, Agapitus was part of the entourage of Pope John I, who had been ordered by king Theodoric to proceed to Constantinople and obtain a moderation of Emperor Justin's decree of 523 against the Arians. Theodoric threatened that if John should fail in his mission, there would be reprisals against the orthodox Catholics in the West. Other Senators accompanying Pope John included Inportunus, Theodorus, and the patrician Agapitus.

Epiphanius of Constantinople

Epiphanius (died June 5, 535) was the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from February 25, 520 to June 5, 535, succeeding John II Cappadocia.

Inportunus

Inportunus (floruit 509–523) was a Roman aristocrat who lived during the reign of Theodoric the Great. He held the consulship without colleague in 509.

Inportunus was the son of Caecina Decius Maximus Basilius (consul in 480), and brother of Albinus iunior (consul in 493), Avienus (consul in 501), and Theodorus (consul in 505). John Moorhead argues that the brothers were on different sides of the Laurentian schism, with Albinus and Avienus supporting Symmachus and Theodore and Inportunus supporting Laurentius. Moorhead also suggests that king Theodoric appointed Inportunus consul for 509 "as a sop to the adherents of the vanquished Laurentius."While organizing the games to celebrate his consulate, Inportunus and his brother Theodorus were accused by the Greens of attacking them and killing one of their members. A surviving letter of Theodoric commands both of them to provide answers to these allegations before the tribunal of the inlustrius Caelianus and Agapitus.In 523, he was part of the entourage of Pope John I, who had been ordered by king Theodoric to proceed to Constantinople and obtain a moderation of Emperor Justin's decree of 523 against the Arians. Theodoric threatened that if John should fail in his mission, there would be reprisals against the orthodox Catholics in the West. Other Senators accompanying Pope John included his brother Theodorus, the ex-consul Agapitus, and the patrician Agapitus.

List of canonised popes

This article lists the Popes who have been canonised or recognised as Saints in the Roman Catholic Church they had led. A total of 83 (out of 266) Popes have been recognised universally as canonised saints, including all of the first 35 Popes (31 of whom were martyrs) and 52 of the first 54. If Pope Liberius is numbered amongst the Saints as in Eastern Christianity, all of the first 49 Popes become recognised as Saints, of whom 31 are Martyr-Saints, and 53 of the first 54 Pontiffs would be acknowledged as Saints. In addition, 13 other Popes are in the process of becoming canonised Saints: as of December 2018, two are recognised as being Servants of God, two are recognised as being Venerable, and nine have been declared Blessed or Beati, making a total of 95 (97 if Pope Liberius and Pope Adeodatus II are recognised to be Saints) of the 266 Roman Pontiffs being recognised and venerated for their heroic virtues and inestimable contributions to the Church.

The most recently reigning Pope to have been canonised was Pope John Paul II, whose cause for canonisation was opened in May 2005. John Paul II was beatified on May 1, 2011, by Pope Benedict XVI and later canonised, along with Pope John XXIII, by Pope Francis on April 27, 2014. Pope Francis also canonised Pope Paul VI on October 14, 2018.

May 18

May 18 is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. 227 days remain until the end of the year.

Ostrogothic Papacy

The Ostrogothic Papacy was a period from 493 to 537 where the papacy was strongly influenced by the Ostrogothic Kingdom, if the pope was not outright appointed by the Ostrogothic King. The selection and administration of popes during this period was strongly influenced by Theodoric the Great and his successors Athalaric and Theodahad. This period terminated with Justinian I's (re)conquest of Rome during the Gothic War (535–554), inaugurating the Byzantine Papacy (537-752).

According to Howorth, "while they were not much interfered with in their administrative work, so long as they did not themselves interfere with politics, the Gothic kings meddled considerably in the selection of the new popes and largely dominated their election. Simony prevailed to a scandalous extent, as did intrigues of a discreditable kind, and the quality and endowments of the candidates became of secondary importance in their chances of being elected, compared with their skill in corrupting the officials of the foreign kings and in their powers of chicane." According to the Catholic Encyclopedia, "[Theodoric] was tolerant towards the Catholic Church and did not interfere in dogmatic matters. He remained as neutral as possible towards the pope, though he exercised a preponderant influence in the affairs of the papacy."

Papal travel

Papal travel outside Rome has been historically rare, and voluntary travel was non-existent for the first 500 years. Pope John Paul II (1978–2005) undertook more pastoral trips than all his predecessors combined. Pope Francis (2013-), Pope Paul VI (1963–1978) and Pope Benedict XVI (2005–2013) also travelled globally, the latter to a lesser extent due to his advanced age.

Popes resided outside Rome—primarily in Viterbo, Orvieto, and Perugia—during the 13th century, and then absconded to France during the Avignon Papacy (1309–1378). Pope Vigilius (537-555) in 547, Pope Agatho (678-681) in 680, and Pope Constantine in 710 visited Constantinople, whereas Pope Martin I (649-655) was abducted there for trial in 653. Pope Stephen II (752-757) became the first pope to cross the Alps in 752 to crown Pepin the Short; Pope Pius VII repeated the feat over a millennium later to crown Napoleon.

Pashons 4 (Coptic Orthodox liturgics)

3 Pashons - Coptic calendar - 5 Pashons

Pope John

Pope John may refer to:

Pope John I (523–526)

Pope John II (533–535)

Pope John III (561–574)

Pope John IV (640–642)

Pope John V (685–686)

Pope John VI (701–705)

Pope John VII (705–707)

Antipope John VIII (844)

Pope John VIII (872–882)

Pope John IX (898–900)

Pope John X (914–928)

Pope John XI (931–935)

Pope John XII (955–964)

Pope John XIII (965–972)

Pope John XIV (983–984)

Pope John XV (985–996)

Antipope John XVI (997–998) (no longer recognized as a legitimate pope)

Pope John XVII (1003)

Pope John XVIII (1003–1009)

Pope John XIX (1024–1032)

Pope John XX (not an actual pope)

Pope John XXI (1276–1277)

Pope John XXII (1316–1334)

Antipope John XXIII (1410–1415)

Pope John XXIII (1958–1963)Another 19 Popes John in the List of Coptic Orthodox Popes of Alexandria

Pope John II

Pope John II (Latin: Ioannes II; died 8 May 535) was pope of the Catholic Church from 2 January 533 to his death in 535.

Pope John I of Alexandria

Pope John I of Alexandria, 29th Pope of Alexandria and Patriarch of the See of St. Mark.

He is counted as John II by the Eastern Orthodox Church, which acknowledges John Talaia as John I, but as John I by the Copts who reject Talaia.

John was born in Alexandria to Christian parents. He became a monk in the Nitrian Desert, at the Monastery of Saint Macarius the Great.

Against his will, he was consecrated Pope and Patriarch of Alexandria on 29 September 496, following the death of Athanasius II. He was the first Alexandrine bishop to be chosen from among the monks from the desert monasteries rather than from the learned clergy of Alexandria. He reigned for eight years and seven months.

During his time as Patriarch, he is recorded as having secured gifts of wheat, wine, and oil for his former monastery from the Emperor.

He was a firm opponent of the Council of Chalcedon and held communion with those who accepted the Henotikon of Emperor Zeno without imposing a formal anathema on Chalcedon. By doing so, he largely kept the church in peace, although also continuing the schism of the Acephaloi, who opposed both the Council of Chalcedon and the conciliatory approach of the Henotikon.

He is commemorated in the Calendar of Saints of the Coptic Church on the 4th day of Pashons, the day of his death.

Pope of the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria

The Pope of the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria is the leader of the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria, a faith with ancient Christian roots in Egypt. The current holder of this position is Pope Tawadros II, who was selected as the 118th pope on November 18, 2012.

Following the traditions of the church, the pope is chairman and head of the Holy Synod of the Coptic Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria as a first among equals. The Holy Synod is the highest authority in the Church of Alexandria, which has between 12 and 18 million members worldwide, 10 to 14 million of whom are in Egypt. It formulates the rules and regulations regarding matters of the church's organization, faith, and order. The pope is also the chairman of the church's General Congregation Council.

Although historically associated with the city of Alexandria, the residence and Seat of the Coptic Orthodox Pope of Alexandria has been located in Cairo since 1047. The pope is currently established in Saint Mark's Coptic Orthodox Cathedral, inside a compound which includes the Patriarchal Palace, with an additional residence at the Monastery of Saint Pishoy.

After the death of Shenouda III on March 17, 2012 the Holy Synod of the Coptic Orthodox Church voted. The names of the three candidates who received most votes were put in a glass chalice. The name then picked became the new Patriarch of Alexandria. It is believed the name is picked by 'Divine Choice', by a blindfolded boy. He is believed to be guided by the hand of God.

The liturgy of the Altar Ballot took place on November 4, 2012. The 60-year-old Bishop Tawadoros, Auxiliary Bishop of Beheira, assistant to Metropolitan Pachomios of Beheira, was chosen as the 118th Pope of Alexandria. He then chose the name of Theodoros II. He was formally enthroned on November 18, 2012.

Theodorus (consul 505)

Theodorus (floruit 505–523) was a Roman politician during the reign of Theodoric the Great. He held the consulship with Flavius Sabinianus as his colleague in 505.

Theodorus was son of Caecina Decius Maximus Basilius (consul in 480), and brother of Albinus iunior (consul in 493), Avienus (consul in 501), and Inportunus (consul in 509).While helping his brother Inportunus organize the games to celebrate Inportunus' consulate, the two of them were accused by the Greens of attacking them and killing one of their members. A surviving letter of Theodoric commands both of them to provide answers to these allegations before the tribunal of the inlustrius Caelianus and Agapitus.John Moorhead identifies Theodorus as the recipient of a surviving letter from bishop Fulgentius of Ruspe, written in 520. While Fulgentius admits they do not know each other, he is writing Theodorus on account of a number of mutual friends, providing him a good deal of spiritual advice, and ends by asking Theodorus to pass his greetings to his mother and wife. "The letter," Moorhead notes, "providing as it does scarcely any concrete information about Theodorus, is doubtless chiefly of interest to the historian of spirituality, but it does enable us to locate Theodorus within another context, that of the circle of Fulgentius' correspondents."In 523, he was part of the entourage of Pope John I, who had been ordered by king Theodoric to proceed to Constantinople and obtain a moderation of Emperor Justin's decree of 523 against the Arians. Theodoric threatened that if John should fail in his mission, there would be reprisals against the orthodox Catholics in the West. Other Senators accompanying Pope John included his brother Inportunus, Agapitus, and the patrician Agapitus.

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