Pope Anastasius III

Pope Anastasius III (died June 913) was Pope from April 911 to his death in 913. He was a Roman by birth.[1] A Roman nobleman, Lucian, is sometimes recognized as his father, although other sources assert that he was the illegitimate son of his predecessor Pope Sergius III (904–911). Almost nothing is recorded of Pope Anastasius III, his pontificate falling in the period when Rome and the Papacy were in the power of Theophylact, Count of Tusculum, and his wife Theodora, who approved Anastasius III's candidacy. Under his reign the Normans of Rollo were evangelized.

His papacy faced renewed threats from the Saracens, after they established themselves on the Garigliano river.[2]

He was buried in St. Peter's Basilica.

Pope

Anastasius III
Pope Anastasius III
Papacy beganApril 911
Papacy endedJune 913
PredecessorSergius III
SuccessorLando
Personal details
Birth nameAnastasius
BornRome, Papal States
DiedJune 913
Rome, Papal States
Other popes named Anastasius

See also

References

  •  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Anastasius" . Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
  1. ^ Platina, Bartolomeo (1479), The Lives of the Popes From The Time Of Our Saviour Jesus Christ to the Accession of Gregory VII, I, London: Griffith Farran & Co., p. 244, retrieved 2013-04-25
  2. ^ Roger Collins (1 Jan 2009). Keepers of the Keys of Heaven: A History of the Papacy. Basic Books. p. 175. ISBN 9780786744183.

External links

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Sergius III
Pope
911–913
Succeeded by
Lando
910s

The 910s decade ran from January 1, 910, to December 31, 919.

913

Year 913 (CMXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Anastasius

Anastasius (Latinized) or Anastasios (Greek: Αναστάσιος, romanized: Anastasios) is derived from the Greek ἀνάστασις (anastasis) meaning "resurrection". Its female form is Anastasia (Greek: Αναστασία). A diminutive form of Anastasios is Tasos (Greek: Τάσος).

Gregoras Iberitzes

Gregoras Iberitzes (Greek: Γρηγορᾶς Ἰβηρίτζης) was a Byzantine nobleman and senior military leader of the early 10th century.

List of cardinals created between 904–985

List of the cardinals attested in the contemporary sources during the period of pornocracy (904 – 964) and later until the election of Pope John XV in August 985. It certainly contains only small part of all cardinals living at that time because only small number of documents and other accounts useful for the reconstruction of that list have been preserved to our times.

The dates in the parentheses mark the first and last time when the cardinal appears in the sources.

List of popes by country

This page is a list of popes by country of origin. They are listed in chronological order within each section.

As the office of pope has existed for almost two millennia, many of the countries of origin of popes no longer exist, and so they are grouped under their modern equivalents. Popes from Italy are in a separate section, given the very large number of popes from that peninsula.

Pope Anastasius

Pope Anastasius may refer to:

Pope Anastasius I, Pope from 399–401

Pope Anastasius II, Pope from 496–498

Pope Anastasius of Alexandria, 605–616

Pope Anastasius III, Pope from 911–913

Pope Anastasius IV, Pope from 1153–1154

Antipope Anastasius

Pope Sergius III

Pope Sergius III (c. 860 − 14 April 911) was Pope from 29 January 904 to his death in 911. He was pope during a period of feudal violence and disorder in central Italy, when warring aristocratic factions sought to use the material and military resources of the Papacy. Because Sergius III had reputedly ordered the murder of his two immediate predecessors, Leo V and Christopher, and allegedly fathered an illegitimate son who later became pope (John XI), his pontificate has been variously described as "dismal and disgraceful", and "efficient and ruthless".

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vercelli

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vercelli (in Latin, Archidioecesis Vercellensis) is a Latin rite Metropolitan see in northern Italy, one of the two archdioceses which form the ecclesiastical region of Piedmont.

The archbishop's seat is in Basilica Cattedrale di S. Eusebio, a minor basilica dedicated to its canonized first bishop, in Vercelli, Piemonte (Piedmont). The city also has two Minor basilicas: Basilica di S. Andrea and Basilica di S. Maria Maggiore

Saeculum obscurum

Saeculum obscurum (Latin: the Dark Age) is a name given to a period in the history of the Papacy during the first two-thirds of the 10th century, beginning with the installation of Pope Sergius III in 904 and lasting for sixty years until the death of Pope John XII in 964. During this period, the popes were influenced strongly by a powerful and corrupt aristocratic family, the Theophylacti, and their relatives.

Second Council of Nicaea

The Second Council of Nicaea is recognized as the last of the first seven ecumenical councils by the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Roman Catholic Church. In addition, it is also recognized as such by the Old Catholics and others. Protestant opinions on it are varied.

It met in AD 787 in Nicaea (site of the First Council of Nicaea; present-day İznik in Turkey) to restore the use and veneration of icons (or, holy images), which had been suppressed by imperial edict inside the Byzantine Empire during the reign of Leo III (717–741). His son, Constantine V (741–775), had held the Council of Hieria to make the suppression official.

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