Pooley Hubert

Allison Thomas Stanislaus "Pooley" Hubert (April 6, 1901 – February 26, 1978) was one of the South's greatest American football players. He played quarterback for coach Wallace Wade's football teams at the University of Alabama from 1922 to 1925, leading Alabama to its first Rose Bowl victory in 1925, known as "the game that changed the South." Coach Wade called him "undoubtedly one of the greatest football players of all time." He later became the head football and basketball coach at the University of Southern Mississippi and the Virginia Military Institute. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1964.

Pooley Hubert
Allison Hubert
Biographical details
BornApril 6, 1901
Meridian, Mississippi
DiedFebruary 26, 1978 (aged 76)
Waynesboro, Georgia
Playing career
1922–1925Alabama
Position(s)Fullback, quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1931–1936Mississippi State Teachers
1937–1946VMI
Basketball
1932–1936Mississippi State Teachers
1936–1937VMI
1942–1943VMI
Baseball
1934–1935Mississippi State Teachers
Head coaching record
Overall69–69–13 (football)
35–49 (basketball)
3–12 (baseball)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
2 SoCon (as player, 1924, 1925)
Awards
2x All-Southern (1924, 1925)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1964 (profile)

Early years

Pooley dropped out of high school to fight in World War I. He earned a scholarship to play football at Princeton University but arrived too late for the entrance exams. He tried a few other schools including Georgia Tech (for which he was one day late)[1] before ultimately enrolling at the University of Alabama as a 20-year-old freshman.[n 1]

University of Alabama

Pooley initially played tackle in college, but was eventually put in the backfield where he excelled at fullback and quarterback. In those days of one-platoon football, players played on both offense, defense, and special teams. Not only was Hubert his team's best passer; he was also called the "greatest defensive back of all time."[2] He wore number 10. He stood 5'10" and 190 pounds.

In six different games he scored at least three touchdowns, and had 35 in all.[3] Zipp Newman wrote "No player deserves more credit for getting Alabama started up the ladder than Hubert—a football coach on the field. He wasn't fast, but he could pass, punt, buck for short yardage, and inspired his teammates. There have been few field generals in Pooley's class."[4] Herman Stegeman remarked that with Hubert in the game Alabama had the advantage another team would have by a coach on the field of play.[5]

1924

Pooley was captain of the 1924 team which netted Alabama's first conference championship, as members of the Southern Conference. It suffered a lone upset to Herb Covington-led Centre. Hubert scored in the 14–0 win over Sewanee. In the 20–0 win over Furman, Hubert scored twice, once on a 4-yard run and next on a 35-yard off-tackle run.[6] He threw two touchdowns in the win over Georgia to secure the conference.[7] At year's end Hubert was chosen for the composite All-Southern team.[8]

HubertRoseBowlTD
Alabama's first Rose Bowl touchdown. Hubert is #10.

1925

Hubert played a key role in helping Alabama win the 1925 national championship. In the 7–0 win over Georgia Tech, the alumni recalled "Hubert played the greatest game of his career and was called the greatest defensive back ever to appear on Grant Field".[9] Johnny Mack Brown returned a punt for the deciding touchdown, and Hubert cleared two Tech players out of the way.[10] Hubert also passed for two touchdowns and ran for another in a 34–0 win against Florida.[9] At year's end he was selected All-Southern.[11]

The climax of his college career was the final game, defeating Wildcat Wilson-led Washington, 20–19, in the 1926 Rose Bowl. Hubert scored the first touchdown. He hit Brown on a 59-yard touchdown pass next to take the lead. He connected with Brown for yet another after a fumble. It is known as "the game that changed the South."

Coaching career

He was a college football coach at Southern Miss, and VMI. From 1931 to 1936, he coached at Southern Miss, where he compiled a 26–24–5 record. From 1937 to 1946, he coached at VMI, where he compiled a 43–45–8 record. His 1938 squad set a school record with four ties. His best season came in 1940, when he went 7–2–1. He then coached at Waynesboro, Georgia High School, where he owned a small business.

Head coaching record

Football

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Mississippi State Teachers Yellow Jackets (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1931–1936)
1931 Mississippi State Teachers 2–5
1932 Mississippi State Teachers 5–4
1933 Mississippi State Teachers 3–5–2
1934 Mississippi State Teachers 3–4–2
1935 Mississippi State Teachers 6–4
1936 Mississippi State Teachers 7–2–1
Mississippi State Teachers: 26–24–5
VMI Keydets (Southern Conference) (1937–1946)
1937 VMI 5–5 5–2 5th
1938 VMI 6–1–4 4–0–3 4th
1939 VMI 6–3–1 3–1–1 6th
1940 VMI 7–2–1 3–2–1 7th
1941 VMI 4–6 4–2 6th
1942 VMI 3–5–1 2–4–1 10th
1943 VMI 2–6 1–3 8th
1944 VMI 1–8 1–5 8th
1945 VMI 5–4 3–2 6th
1946 VMI 4–5–1 3–3–1 8th
VMI: 43–45–8 29–24–7
Total: 69–69–13

[12]

Basketball

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Mississippi State Teachers Yellow Jackets (Independent) (1932–1936)
1932–33 Mississippi State Teachers 4–10
1933–34 Mississippi State Teachers 7–6
1934–35 Mississippi State Teachers 3–9
1935–36 Mississippi State Teachers 7–5
Mississippi State Teachers: 21–30
VMI Keydets (Southern Conference) (1936–1937)
1936–37 VMI 6–11 5–11 13th
VMI Keydets (Southern Conference) (1942–1943)
1942–43 VMI 8–8 7–5 7th
VMI: 14–19 12–16
Total: 35–49

[13][14]

Notes

  1. ^ By the time he was a 24-year-old senior, his teammates had begun calling him "Papa Pooley" because he was so much older than them.

References

  1. ^ http://www.vmi.edu/uploadedFiles/Archives/Records/Faculty/PooleyHubertobit.pdf
  2. ^ "POOLEY".
  3. ^ "National Football Foundation".
  4. ^ Zipp Newman. "Alabama's grid stars of '20's put gravy in bowls".
  5. ^ Woodruff, pp. 7–8
  6. ^ http://grfx.cstv.com/schools/alab/graphics/docs/24-m-footbl-recaps.pdf
  7. ^ "Alabama Football - Bryant Museum".
  8. ^ closed access "Atlanta Journals Picks S. I. C. All Star Team". Times-Picayune. December 8, 1924.
  9. ^ a b http://grfx.cstv.com/schools/alab/graphics/docs/25-m-footbl-recaps.pdf
  10. ^ "Legends of Alabama Football".
  11. ^ Norman E. Brown (December 5, 1925). "Flournoy Best Kicker; Hubert The Cleverest Field General". The Daily News. p. 3. Retrieved March 3, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  12. ^ "All-Time Coaching Records by Year".
  13. ^ 2013–14 VMI Basketball Fact Book
  14. ^ "USM Men's Basketball 2013-14".
  • Woodruff, Fuzzy (1928). A History of Southern Football 1890–1928. 3.

External links

1922 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1922 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1922 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 29th overall and 1st season as a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon). The team was led by head coach Xen C. Scott, in his fourth year, and played their home games at Denny Field in Tuscaloosa, Rickwood Field in Birmingham and the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of six wins, three losses and one tie (6–3–1 overall, 3–2–1 in the SoCon).

Alabama opened the season with a 110–0 victory over the Marion Military Institute which still stands as the school record for largest margin of victory and as the Crimson Tide's only 100 point game. After a victory over Oglethorpe, Alabama went winless over their next three games with losses at both Georgia Tech and Texas and a tie against Sewanee at Rickwood Field. With a record of 2–2–1, Alabama entered an intersectional contest against undefeated Penn as a major underdog. Alabama managed to upset the Quakers 9–7 in a game The Plain Dealer called "intersectional history". The Crimson Tide then completed their season with a homecoming win over LSU, a loss at Kentucky, a win over Georgia in Alabama's first game at the Cramton Bowl and a win over Mississippi A&M to close the season.

1922 Alabama vs. Penn football game

The 1922 Alabama vs. Pennsylvania football game, played November 4, 1922, was a college football game between the Alabama Crimson Tide and Penn Quakers. Beating one of the "big 4" Ivy League institutions in a major upset, it is considered one of the most important wins in Alabama football history, giving the team some of its first national recognition. One writer called the game the hardest fought battle on Penn's field in seven years.

1922 College Football All-Southern Team

The 1922 College Football All-Southern Team consists of college football players chosen by various organizations and writers for College Football All-Southern Teams for the 1922 Southern Conference football season. It was the first season of the Southern Conference.

Vanderbilt end Lynn Bomar and Georgia Tech running back Red Barron were the only two unanimous choices of a composite of selectors. Walter Camp picked no Southerners for his first-team All-American, but picked Bomar and Barron for his second team.

1923 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1923 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1923 Southern Conference football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 30th overall and 2nd season as a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon). The team was led by head coach Wallace Wade, in his first year, and played their home games at Denny Field in Tuscaloosa, at Rickwood Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of seven wins, two losses and one tie (7–2–1 overall, 4–1–1 in the SoCon).

1923 marked the first season for new head coach Wallace Wade, a former assistant at Vanderbilt. One year after Alabama's triumphal trip to Penn, the Tide went on another northeast roadtrip with a different outcome, losing to Syracuse 23–0. Against Georgia Tech, Alabama was very lucky to escape with a 0–0 tie. After defeating Georgia, the Tide was the favorite for a Southern title. A season-ending, 16–6 upset loss to coach James Van Fleet's Florida Gators cost coach Wade and the Tide the Southern Conference championship.

1924 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1924 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1924 Southern Conference football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 31st overall and 3rd season as a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon). The team was led by head coach Wallace Wade, in his second year, and played their home games at Denny Field in Tuscaloosa, at Rickwood Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of eight wins and one loss (8–1 overall, 5–0 in the SoCon), as Southern Conference champions and won the Champ Pickens Trophy.

Alabama opened the season with six consecutive shutout victories. After they defeated Union University at Tuscaloosa, the Crimson Tide defeated Furman in their first road contest of the season. Alabama returned to Tuscaloosa where they defeated Mississippi College a week prior to their victory over Sewanee at Birmingham in their SoCon opener. The Crimson Tide continued their dominance with victories at Georgia Tech and in Montgomery against Ole Miss before they allowed their first points of the season in their homecoming victory over Kentucky. Alabama then closed the season with a pair of games at Birmingham where they first lost their lone game against Centre and defeated Georgia in their final game and captured their first SoCon championship.

1924 College Football All-Southern Team

The 1924 College Football All-Southern Team consists of American football players selected to the College Football All-Southern Teams selected by various organizations for the 1924 Southern Conference football season.

Alabama won the SoCon championship. Centre defeated Alabama and claims a Southern championship, even though Centre was never a member of the Southern Conference.

1925 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1925 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1925 Southern Conference football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 32nd overall and 4th season as a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon). The team was led by head coach Wallace Wade, in his third year, and played their home games at Denny Field in Tuscaloosa, at Rickwood Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished the season with their first ever perfect record (10–0 overall, 7–0 in the SoCon), as Southern Conference champions and as national champions after they defeated Washington in the Rose Bowl.The Crimson Tide entered the season as the defending Southern Conference champions after finishing the 1924 season with an 8–1 record. Alabama would then go on and shutout all but one of their regular season opponents en route to a second consecutive Southern Conference championship. The Crimson Tide then accepted an invitation to participate as the first Southern team in the annual Rose Bowl Game, where they defeated Washington 20–19. This victory has subsequently been recognized as one of the most important in Southern football history as well as has been deemed "the game that changed the South."

1925 College Football All-Southern Team

The 1925 College Football All-Southern Team consists of American football players selected to the College Football All-Southern Teams selected by various organizations for the 1925 Southern Conference football season.

In the annual Rose Bowl game, the SoCon champion Alabama Crimson Tide defeated the heavily favored PCC champion Washington Huskies 20–19 and became the first southern team ever to win a Rose Bowl. It is commonly referred to as "the game that changed the south." Alabama therefore was named a national champion.

A. B. Dille

Avery B. Dille was an American football and basketball player and coach.

Charles Bartlett (American football)

Charles Henry "Stumpy" Bartlett (June 14, 1899 – March 29, 1965) was a college football player.

Earl Abell

Earl C. "Tuffy" Abell (May 29, 1892 – May 26, 1956) was an American football player and coach. He played college football as a tackle at Colgate University. He later returned to Colgate as an assistant coach in 1925, and took over the head coaching job in 1928. He spent the 1929 and 1930 football seasons as head football coach at the University of Virginia. Abell was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as player in 1973.

List of Alabama Crimson Tide players in the College Football Hall of Fame

The Alabama Crimson Tide college football team competes as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), and represents the University of Alabama in the Western Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The College Football Hall of Fame was established in 1951 to honor the careers of selected student-athletes who have competed in college football as either a player or coach. Since its inaugural class that year, Alabama has had 23 persons elected to the Hall of Fame as either a player or coach of the Crimson Tide.The first Alabama inductees into the Hall of Fame were Don Hutson and Frank Thomas as part of the inaugural class in 1951. The most recent inductee was Derrick Thomas as part of the 2014 class.

List of Southern Miss Golden Eagles football seasons

This is a list of seasons completed by the Southern Miss Golden Eagles college football team.

O. V. Austin

Oliver V. "Spout" Austin Sr. (September 25, 1890 – May 22, 1960) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at the Mississippi Normal College—now known as the University of Southern Mississippi—in Hattiesburg, Mississippi from 1921 to 1923, compiling a record of 8–13. Austin was also the head basketball coach at Mississippi Normal from 1921 to 19283, tallying a mark of 15–6, and the school's head baseball from 1920 to 1924, amassing a record of 33–15–3.

Reed Green

Bernard Reed Green (December 12, 1911 – February 1, 2002) was an American football, basketball, and baseball player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at the University of Southern Mississippi from 1937 to 1948, compiling a record of 59–20–4. Green's winning percentage of .735 is the best of and head coach in the history of the Southern Miss Golden Eagles football program. Born in Leakesville, Mississippi, he attended the University of Southern Mississippi from 1930 until 1933 and lettered on the football, basketball, and baseball teams. He became the head coach of Southern Miss when Allison Pooley Hubert left to become the head coach at Virginia Military Institute. Green became the athletic director at Southern Miss in 1949 and held that position until 1973. He was inducted into the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame in 1966. Green died in 2002.Reed Green Coliseum, home of the Southern Miss Golden Eagles basketball and volleyball teams, is named for him.

Ronald J. Slay

Ronald J. Slay (November 15, 1890 – September 18, 1948) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach. A teacher of science and modern language, he was appointed by the faculty of Mississippi Normal College—now known as the University of Southern Mississippi—in Hattiesburg, Mississippi as school's first head football coach in 1912. He served in that capacity for one season, compiling a record of 2–1. Slay was also the head basketball coach at Mississippi Normal in 1912–13 and from 1918 to 1920, tallying a mark of 9–7, and the school's head baseball coach from 1914 to 1916 and in 1919, tallying a mark 4–5.

Thad Vann

Thad "Pie" Vann (September 22, 1907 – September 7, 1982) was an American football and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Southern Mississippi—known as Mississippi Southern College prior to 1962—from 1949 to 1968. During his tenure, he compiled a 139–59–2 record and helped transform Mississippi Southern into one of the nation's elite programs. His only losing season came in 1968, after 19 consecutive winning seasons. His 1953 team went 9–2, including a major upset against Alabama. His 1954 team went 6–4 and upset Alabama once again. He was also the head baseball coach at Mississippi Southern from 1948 to 1949, tallying a mark of 21–21. Van died on September 7, 1982, at Veterans Administration Hospital in Jackson, Mississippi, following long illness. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1987.

W. C. Raftery

William Caulfield Raftery (July 28, 1887 – July 2, 1965) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach. He was the 17th head football at Virginia Military Institute (VMI) located in Lexington, Virginia. He held that position for ten seasons, from 1927 until 1936.

His career coaching record at VMI was 38–55–5. This ranks him fifth at VMI in total wins and 19th at VMI in winning percentage.Raftery was born in Worcester, Massachusetts. He entered the pharmaceutical business in Ashland, Virginia in 1948, retiring in 1960. Raftery died at his home in Ashland in 1965. He was buried in Lexington, Virginia.

William Herschel Bobo

William Herschel Bobo (January 16, 1896 – 1975) was a minor league baseball player and an American football, basketball, and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at Mississippi State Teachers College—now known as the University of Southern Mississippi—from 1924 to 1927, compiling a record of 9–17–4. Bobo was also the head basketball coach at Mississippi State Teachers from 1924 to 1928, tallying a mark of 31–17–1, and the school's head baseball from 1925 to 1928, amassing a record of 19–10–1.

Pooley Hubert—awards and honors

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.