Politburo of the Communist Party of China

The Central Politburo of the Communist Party of China, formally known as the Political Bureau of the CPC Central Committee and known as Central Bureau before 1927, is a group of 25 people who oversee the Communist Party of China. Unlike politburos (political bureaus) of other Communist parties, power within the politburo is centralized in the Politburo Standing Committee, a smaller group of Politburo members.

The Politburo is nominally elected by the Central Committee. In practice, however, analysts believe that the Politburo is a self-perpetuating body, with new members of both the Politburo and its Standing Committee chosen through a series of deliberations by current Politburo members and retired Politburo Standing Committee members. The current and former Politburo members conduct a series of informal straw polls to determine the group's level of support for each new candidate's membership in the Politburo. The process for selecting the new Politburo begins with a closed door meeting by the incumbent Politburo Standing Committee in Beidaihe in the summer before the Party Congress convenes.[2][3]

The power of the Politburo resides largely in the fact that its members generally simultaneously hold positions within the People's Republic of China state positions and with the control over personnel appointments that the Politburo and Secretariat have. In addition, some Politburo members hold powerful regional positions. How the Politburo works internally is unclear, but it appears that the full Politburo meets once a month and the standing committee meets weekly. This is believed to be much more infrequent than the former Soviet Politburo had met. The agenda for the meetings appears to be controlled by the General Secretary and decisions are made by consensus rather than by majority vote.[4]

The Politburo was eclipsed by the Secretariat of the Communist Party of China Central Committee in the early 1980s under Hu Yaobang,[5] but has re-emerged as a dominant force after Hu's ousting in 1987.

Central Political Bureau of the Communist Party of China

中国共产党中央政治局
Coat of arms or logo
Leadership
Status
Leader of
the Party
1st-ranked
member
Elected by
the Central Committee
Responsible to
the Central Committee
Seats25
Meeting place
1st National People's Congress 1
Huairen Hall, Zhongnanhai
Beijing, China[1]
Politburo of the Communist Party of China
Simplified Chinese中国共产党中央政治局
Traditional Chinese中國共產黨中央政治局
Literal meaningChina Communist Party Central Political Bureau
Politburo
Chinese政治局
Literal meaningPolitical Bureau

Current Politburo

The 19th Politburo was elected at the first plenary session of the 19th Central Committee in October 2017.

Hanzi Name Year of birth K Office(s)
习近平 Xi Jinping
1953
General Secretary of the Communist Party of China
President of the People's Republic of China
Chairman of the Central Military Commission
李克强 Li Keqiang
1955
Premier of the State Council
栗战书 Li Zhanshu
1950
Chairman of the National People's Congress Standing Committee
汪洋 Wang Yang
1955
Chairman of the National Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference
王沪宁 Wang Huning
1955
Secretary of the Central Secretariat (first-ranked)
赵乐际 Zhao Leji
1957
Secretary of the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection
韩正 Han Zheng
1954
Vice Premier of the State Council (first-ranked)
丁薛祥 Ding Xuexiang
1962
Director of the General Office
王晨 Wang Chen
1950
Vice Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress
刘鹤 Liu He
1952
Vice Premier of the State Council
许其亮 Xu Qiliang
1950
§ Vice Chairman of the Central Military Commission
孙春兰 Sun Chunlan
1950
Vice Premier of the State Council
李希 Li Xi
1956
Party Secretary of Guangdong
李强 Li Qiang
1959
Party Secretary of Shanghai
李鸿忠 Li Hongzhong
1956
Party Secretary of Tianjin
胡春华 Hu Chunhua
1963
Vice Premier of the State Council
杨洁篪 Yang Jiechi
1950
Director of the Office of Foreign Affairs
杨晓渡 Yang Xiaodu
1953
Director of the National Supervisory Commission
张又侠 Zhang Youxia
1950
§ Vice Chairman of the Central Military Commission
陈希 Chen Xi
1953
Head of the Organization Department
陈全国 Chen Quanguo
1955
Party Secretary of the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
陈敏尔 Chen Min'er
1960
Party Secretary of Chongqing
郭声琨 Guo Shengkun
1954
Secretary of the Political and Legal Affairs Commission
黄坤明 Huang Kunming
1956
Head of the Propaganda Department
蔡奇 Cai Qi
1955
Party Secretary of Beijing
Keys
Abbreviations
IDUCC Institutions Directly Under the Central Committee
K Keys
CIM Central institution membership, which in this instance means membership in the PSC, PB, ST and CMC
PSC Standing Committee of the Political Bureau
PB Political Bureau
ST Secretariat
CMC Central Military Commission
SC–CCDI Standing Committee of the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection
CCDI Central Commission for Discipline Inspection
CPPCC Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference
NL National Leader
DNL Deputy National Leader
PM Provincial-Ministerial
SPM Sub-provincial (vice-ministerial)
DE Department-prefecture level
Adm. Admiral
V-Adm. Vice-Admiral
Gen. General
Lt. Gen. Lieutenant General
Maj. Gen. Major General
Keys
Indicates that the individual is female.
Indicates that the individual was elevated from alternate to full member
Indicates that the individual was expelled from the Communist Party after CCDI investigation.
Indicates that the individual is currently under investigation by the CCDI.
Indicates that the individual is retired from active political positions[note 1]
§ Indicates that the individual is military personnel.
Indicates that the individual is military personnel and has retired from active military service.
Note If two keys are used in the same column it indicates that the individual is both of something. For instance,
"♀§" indicates that the individual is female (♀) and military personnel (§).

Notes

  1. ^ "Active" political positions refer to the offices of Governor and provincial-level Party Secretary; often, an individual is considered retired when they relinquish either of those offices due to age, and are assigned some kind of committee membership in the National People's Congress.

References

  1. ^ Wang, Jun (15 June 2013). "中央政治局如何开会". qikan.com. Retrieved 18 October 2017.
  2. ^ Li, Cheng (2016). Chinese Politics in the Xi Jinping Era: Reassessing Collective Leadership. Brookings Institution Press. ISBN 9780815726937. Retrieved 18 October 2017.
  3. ^ Kang Lim, Benjamin (20 November 2017). "Exclusive: China's backroom powerbrokers block reform candidates - sources". Reuters. Retrieved 18 October 2017.
  4. ^ Miller, H. "Hu Jintao and the Party Politburo" (PDF). China Leadership Monitor. Hoover Institution. p. 5. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  5. ^ Li, Cheng et al. (2008). China's Changing Political Landscape, Washington: Brookings Institution Press. ISBN 978-0-8157-5209-7.

External links

See also

10th Politburo of the Communist Party of China

The 10th Politburo of the Communist Party of China was elected at the 1st Plenary Session of the 10th Central Committee on August 30, 1973, consisting of 21 members and 4 alternate members. There were additions to the membership in 1973 and 1977. It was informally supervised by the Politburo Standing Committee of the Communist Party of China. It was preceded by the 9th Politburo of the Communist Party of China.

11th Politburo of the Communist Party of China

The 11th Central Politburo of the Communist Party of China was elected at the 1st Plenary Session of the 11th Central Committee on August 19, 1977, consisting of 23 members and 3 alternate members. There were additions to the membership in 1978 and 1979. It served until 1982. It was preceded by the 10th Politburo of the Communist Party of China.

12th Politburo of the Communist Party of China

The 12th Politburo of the Communist Party of China was elected at the 1st Plenary Session of the 12th Central Committee on September 13, 1982, consisting of 25 members and 3 alternate members. It served until 1987. It was preceded by the 11th Politburo of the Communist Party of China. This politburo was reorganized in September 1985, with a retirement of senior members and election of new members. It was succeeded by the 13th Politburo of the Communist Party of China.

13th Politburo of the Communist Party of China

The 13th Politburo of the Communist Party of China was elected at the 1st Plenary Session of the 13th Central Committee on November 2, 1987, consisting of 17 members and 1 alternate member. During the 2nd plenary session of this politburo, the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests occurred, and were ultimately crushed by the orders of the 13th Standing Committee of the Communist Party of China. This was preceded by the 12th Politburo of the Communist Party of China. It was succeeded by the 14th Politburo of the Communist Party of China.

14th Politburo of the Communist Party of China

The 14th Politburo of the Communist Party of China was elected by the 14th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China on October 19, 1992. It was preceded by the 13th Politburo of the Communist Party of China. It served until 1997. It was succeeded by the 15th Politburo of the Communist Party of China.

15th Politburo of the Communist Party of China

The 15th Politburo of the Communist Party of China was elected by the 15th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China on September 19, 1997. It was preceded by the 14th Politburo of the Communist Party of China. It served until 2002.

16th Politburo of the Communist Party of China

The 16th Politburo of the Communist Party of China was elected by the 16th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China on November 15, 2002. It was nominally preceded by the 15th Politburo of the Communist Party of China. This was the main vangaurd executive committee functioning within the Standing Committee of the Communist Party of China. It was formally superseded by the 17th Politburo of the Communist Party of China.

17th Politburo of the Communist Party of China

The 17th Central Politburo of the Communist Party of China was elected by the 17th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China on October 22, 2007. Eventually, four members of this Politburo were expelled from the Communist Party for not adhering to the leading party thought. They were, in order of the time of expulsion, Bo Xilai, Xu Caihou, Zhou Yongkang, and Guo Boxiong. This politburo was preceded by the 16th Politburo of the Communist Party of China and succeeded by the 18th Politburo of the Communist Party of China.

18th Politburo of the Communist Party of China

The 18th Central Politburo of the Communist Party of China (Chinese: 中国共产党第十八届中央政治局) was elected by the 18th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China on 15 November 2012, which was formally elected by the 18th National Congress of the Communist Party of China. It was nominally preceded by the 17th Politburo. It was ultimately succeeded by the 19th Politburo of the Communist Party of China.

19th Politburo of the Communist Party of China

The 19th Central Politburo of the Communist Party of China (Chinese: 中国共产党第十九届中央政治局) of the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China was elected by the 1st Plenary Session of the 19th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China on 25 October 2017. It was nominally preceded by the 18th Politburo of the Communist Party of China.

7th Politburo of the Communist Party of China

The 7th Politburo of the Communist Party of China was elected at the 1st Plenary Session of the 7th Central Committee on June 19, 1945, consisting of 13 members. It was actively preceded by the 6th Politburo of the Communist Party of China. There were additions to the membership in 1955.

9th Politburo of the Communist Party of China

The 9th Politburo of the Communist Party of China was elected at the 1st Plenary Session of the 9th Central Committee on April 28, 1969 and sat in session until August 1973, consisting of 21 members and 4 alternate members. It met for four years, during the middle of the politically insoluble Chinese Cultural Revolution. It had been preceded by the 8th Politburo of the Communist Party of China.

Chen Xi (politician)

Chen Xi (Chinese: 陈希; born September 1953) is a Chinese politician currently serving as the head of the Organization Department of the Communist Party of China. Since 2017, Chen has also been a member of the Politburo of the Communist Party of China and a Secretary of the Secretariat of the Communist Party of China, and President of the Central Party School. A graduate from Tsinghua University, Chen served as the party chief of the prestigious institution from 2002 to 2008. Thereafter he served as a vice-minister of education and Vice Chairman of the China Association for Science and Technology.

Hui Liangyu

Hui Liangyu (Chinese: 回良玉; pinyin: Huí Liángyù,

Xiao'erjing: ﺧُﻮِ ﻟِﯿْﺎ ﻳُﻮْْ‎ ; born October 1944) was a Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China in charge of agriculture.

Li Xiannian

Li Xiannian (pronounced [lì ɕjɛ́nnjɛ̂n]; 23 June 1909 – 21 June 1992) was the President of the People's Republic of China between 1983 and 1988 and then Chairman of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference until his death. Li was an influential political figure throughout the PRC, having been a member of the Politburo of the Communist Party of China from 1956. He rose to prominence in the Communist Party of China in 1976, when Hua Guofeng succeeded Mao Zedong as Chairman of the Communist Party of China. At the height of his career in the 1980s, Li was considered one of the most influential architects of China's economic policy after the Cultural Revolution, and is considered one of the Eight Elders of the Communist Party of China.

Peng Zhen

Peng Zhen (pronounced [pʰə̌ŋ ʈʂə́n]; October 12, 1902 – April 26, 1997) was a leading member of the Communist Party of China. He led the party organization in Beijing following the victory of the Communists in the Chinese Civil War in 1949, but was purged during the Cultural Revolution for opposing Mao's views on the role of literature in relation to the state. He was rehabilitated under Deng Xiaoping in 1982 along with other 'wrongly accused' officials, and became the inaugural head of the CPC Central Political and Legislative Committee.

Tian Jiyun

Tian Jiyun (simplified Chinese: 田纪云; traditional Chinese: 田紀雲; pinyin: Tián Jìyún; born June 1929 in Feicheng, Shandong) is a politician in the People's Republic of China, known as a supporter of Deng Xiaoping's reforms. The best-known feature of his biography is the speech of 1992, delivered in the Central Party School, in which he ridicules the "leftists" (those who did not support the new policy of openness). Tian proposed they establish their own "economic zones" preserving all the worst features of the old system.

Wang Lequan

Wang Lequan (born December 1944) is a retired Chinese politician, most notable for being the Communist Party Secretary in Xinjiang, the autonomous region's top political office, between 1994 and 2010. From 2004 to 2012 Wang was also a member of the Politburo of the Communist Party of China. From 2010 to 2012 he was a Deputy Secretary of the Political and Legal Affairs Commission. He retired from active politics in 2012, and became President of the China Law Society in 2013.

Xu Qiliang

Xu Qiliang (Chinese: 许其亮; pinyin: Xǔ Qíliàng; born March 1950) is an air force general in the People's Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) of the People's Republic of China. He currently serves as Vice chairman of the Central Military Commission, and was Commander of the PLAAF from 2007 to 2012.

Transcriptions
Standard Mandarin
Hanyu PinyinZhōngguó Gòngchǎndǎng Zhōngyāng Zhèngzhìjú
Transcriptions
Standard Mandarin
Hanyu PinyinZhèngzhìjú
Standing Committee
Other members
in surname stroke order
Central Politburo of the Communist Party of China
Major organs
Departments
Institutions
Commissions
Leading Groups
Sittings

Languages

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