Poland, Ohio

Poland is a village about 7 miles (11 km) southeast of Youngstown in Mahoning County, Ohio, United States. The population was 2,555 at the 2010 census.[6] It is part of the Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, OH-PA Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Poland, Ohio
Post office along McKinley Way
Post office along McKinley Way
Location of Poland, Ohio
Location of Poland, Ohio
Location of Poland in Mahoning County
Location of Poland in Mahoning County
Coordinates: 41°1′29″N 80°36′44″W / 41.02472°N 80.61222°W
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyMahoning
Area
 • Total1.65 sq mi (4.27 km2)
 • Land1.63 sq mi (4.22 km2)
 • Water0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation1,043 ft (318 m)
Population
 • Total2,555
 • Estimate 
(2012[4])
2,520
 • Density1,567.5/sq mi (605.2/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
44514
Area code(s)234/330
FIPS code39-63954[5]
GNIS feature ID1061561[2]

History

In 1796, Poland Township was the first charted township in the Connecticut Western Reserve, being the southeastern most portion (Township 1, Range 1). The township was founded by Jonathan Fowler, who fell in love with Yellow Creek which flows through Poland. He owned an inn near the river which still stands as the oldest building in Poland. The historical buildings of Poland have a sign in the shape of Ohio by the building's front door.

The Village of Poland was founded in 1802. Poland Seminary was originally a private secondary school, Poland Academy, and then a liberal arts college founded in 1849. Its main building has been incorporated into Poland Middle School on College Street. Its dormitory is incorporated into the Poland Public Library on Main Street. Former distinguished faculty include the journalist Ida Tarbell; graduates include William McKinley, President of the United States.

The former medical school and Ohio Law College is now a private residence on College Street. Poland is the home to the Poland Seminary High School Bulldogs.

Schools and education

The Poland Local School District has two elementary schools: Union, and McKinley elementary school for 3rd,4th,and 5th graders, Poland McKinley, named after the former U.S. President William McKinley. Poland Middle School is home for the 6th,7th and 8th grade classes and Poland Seminary High School, often referred to as PSHS, houses the 9th through 12th grades.

A Catholic school in Poland, Holy Family, serves children in pre-kindergarten through the 8th grade.

Poland has been designated 'Top School' in Ohio along with Canfield, Struthers, Niles, Springfield, Austintown, Sebring, Youngstown, South Range, and Beaver Local.

Poland has a public library, a branch of the Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning County.[7]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has an area of 1.65 square miles (4.27 km2), of which 1.63 square miles (4.22 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850583
1870453
1880452−0.2%
1890391−13.5%
1900370−5.4%
1910367−0.8%
192056152.9%
193096872.5%
19401,24028.1%
19501,65233.2%
19602,76667.4%
19703,09712.0%
19803,084−0.4%
19902,992−3.0%
20002,866−4.2%
20102,555−10.9%
Est. 20172,446[8]−4.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]

2010 census

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 2,555 people, 1,066 households, and 765 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,567.5 inhabitants per square mile (605.2/km2). There were 1,135 housing units at an average density of 696.3 per square mile (268.8/km2). The village's racial makeup was 98.5% White, 0.2% African American, 0.4% Asian, and 0.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.1% of the population.

There were 1,066 households, of which 27.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.8% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 28.2% were non-families. 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.88.

The median age in the village was 46.3 years. 21.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 21.1% were from 25 to 44; 30.4% were from 45 to 64; and 21.3% were 65 years of age or older. The village's gender makeup was 48.2% male and 51.8% female.

2000 census

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 2,990 people, 1,086 households, and 822 families residing in the village. The population density was 2,303.2 people per square mile (892.4/km²). There were 1,123 housing units at an average density of 902.5 per square mile (349.7/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 99.16% White, 0.24% African American, 0.10% Asian, 0.17% from other races, and 0.31% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.98% of the population.

There were 1,086 households out of which 34.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.4% were married couples living together, 9.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.3% were non-families. 22.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the village, the population was spread out with 24.6% under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 25.6% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 19.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 92.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.3 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $47,273, and the median income for a family was $55,486. Males had a median income of $42,857 versus $23,603 for females. The per capita income for the village was $23,924. About 4.5% of families and 6.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.8% of those under age 18 and 13.2% of those age 65 or over.

Notable person

References

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-07-14. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-06-17. Retrieved 2013-06-17.
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Poland village, Ohio". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved March 27, 2013.
  7. ^ "Locations & Hours". Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning County. Retrieved 26 February 2018.
  8. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 26, 2018.
  9. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  10. ^ Barone, Michael; Ujifusa, Grant (1987). The Almanac of American Politics 1988. National Journal. p. 953.

External links

Coordinates: 41°01′29″N 80°36′44″W / 41.024676°N 80.612287°W

Billy Dugan

William Dugan (born November 29, 1989 in Youngstown, Ohio) is an American football player from Poland, Ohio. He will be attending Youngstown State University where he will be playing on the offensive line for the football team. Bill was awarded to the all MAC (Metro Athletic Conference). Dugan is currently listed as 6'5", 300 lbs.

David S. Dennison Jr.

David Short Dennison Jr. (July 29, 1918 – September 21, 2001) was an American politician of the Republican party who served in the United States House of Representatives from 1957 to 1959.

Ed Policy

Ed Policy (born 1971) is an American football executive and the current Chief Operating Officer and General Counsel for the Green Bay Packers. Previously, Policy was the Commissioner of the Arena Football League.

George Cookman Sturgiss

George Cookman Sturgiss (August 16, 1842 – February 26, 1925) was a lawyer and Republican politician who served as United States Representative for West Virginia's 2nd congressional district. He was a member of the 60th and 61st United States Congresses.

James Kennedy (congressman)

James Kennedy (September 3, 1853 – November 9, 1928) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born in Lowellville, Ohio, Kennedy prepared for college at Poland Union Seminary, in Ohio, and graduated from Westminster College, New Wilmington, Pennsylvania, in 1876. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in March 1879. Kennedy commenced to practice law in Youngstown, Ohio, where he also served as a member of the city council from April 1886 to November 1888. In 1894, he served as chairman of the Republican State convention at Steubenville, Ohio, in 1894.

Kennedy was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-eighth and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1903 – March 3, 1911). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1910, to the Sixty-second Congress. He resumed the practice of his profession in Youngstown.

Kennedy became affiliated with the Democratic Party in 1916. He was an unsuccessful Democratic candidate for election in 1926, to the Seventieth Congress. He died in Youngstown on November 9, 1928, and was interred in Riverside Cemetery, Poland, Ohio.

Jared Potter Kirtland

Jared Potter Kirtland (November 10, 1793 – December 10, 1877) was a naturalist, malacologist, and politician most active in the U.S. state of Ohio, where he served as a probate judge, and in the Ohio House of Representatives. He was also a physician and co-founder of Western Reserve University's Medical School, as well as what would become the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Kirtland's warbler (Setophaga kirtlandii), Kirtland's snake (Clonophis kirtlandii), and the forest vine snake (Thelotornis kirtlandii) are named after him.

Kirtland was born in Wallingford, Connecticut. His mother was Mary, daughter of Dr. Jared Potter, a famous physician of Wallingford. His father, Turhand Kirtland, was largely interested in the purchases made by the Connecticut Land Company in Ohio, and moved to the Western Reserve in 1803. In the meantime the son remained in Wallingford. When Potter died in 1810, he left a legacy to provide for Jared's medical education at Edinburgh. But the War of 1812 with Great Britain prevented the voyage, and when the Yale School of Medicine went into operation in 1813, Kirtland was the first matriculated student in a class of 38 members. He was married in May, 1814, to Caroline, second daughter of Joshua Atwater, of Wallingford, and after graduation in 1815 he practiced in Wallingford until 1818, when he made a journey to Ohio to perfect arrangements for a removal thither. But on returning for his family he found a peculiarly attractive opportunity for establishing himself in Durham, Conn., and there remained until the death of his wife in 1823, when he carried out his intention of settling in Poland, Ohio.

He had acquired a large country practice, and had also been for three terms a member of the legislature, when in 1837 he was elected to the professorship of the theory and practice of medicine in the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati. He resigned this position in 1842, having in the meantime purchased a fine fruit farm in East Rockport, five miles from the city of Cleveland, where he spent the rest of his life. In 1843 the medical department of the Western Reserve College was established, at Cleveland, and he filled the chair of theory and practice in that institution until 1864. He was elected an Associate Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1855.Besides his professional attainments, Dr. Kirtland was interested in all departments of natural history. He was an efficient assistant in the first geological survey of Ohio, and was untiring in his efforts to improve the horticulture and agriculture of his adopted state. He died at his residence in East Rockport, Dec. 11, 1877, aged 84 years.

Shortly alter the death of his first wife he was married to Hannah F. Toucey, of Newtown, Conn. Of three children by his first marriage, one daughter survived him.

This article incorporates public domain material from the Yale Obituary Record.

Jim Reynolds (Canadian football)

Jim Reynolds (born January 10, 1938) was a Canadian football player who played for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats, Toronto Argonauts, Ottawa Rough Riders, and Montreal Alouettes. He won the Grey Cup with the Tiger-Cats in 1965. He played college football at Hillsdale College in Michigan.

John Boccieri

John Boccieri (born October 5, 1969) is an American politician who has represented the 59th district in the Ohio House of Representatives since being appointed to fill a vacancy on September 29, 2015. He served as the U.S. Representative for Ohio's 16th congressional district from 2009 to 2011, and lost his 2010 bid for reelection to Republican Jim Renacci. He is a member of the Democratic Party, and previously served in the Ohio State Senate and the Ohio House of Representatives. Boccieri resides in Poland, Ohio.

Julian Kennedy

Julian Kennedy (March 15, 1852 - May 28, 1932) was an American engineer and inventor, known for his national and international contributions to the steel industry. He was awarded the ASME Medal in 1928.

Junior League World Series (softball)

The Junior League Softball World Series is a softball tournament for girls aged between 12 and 14. The tournament is administered by Little League Baseball, Inc. and is held annually in the Seattle suburb of Kirkland, Washington.

Kate Brownlee Sherwood

Kate Brownlee Sherwood (September 24, 1841 – February 15, 1914) was a 19th-century American poet, journalist, and translator from Ohio, also known as a story writer, philanthropist, patron of art and literature. She was the founder of the Woman's Relief Corps and served as its second president. She is best known as the author of army lyrics and poems written for the celebration of military occasions.She was the author of: Camp-Fire and Memorial Poems (1885); Dreams of the Ages; a Poem of Columbia (1893); The Memorial of the Flowers (1888), and Guarding the Flags (1890). Helen Louisa Bostwick Bird and Alice Williams Brotherton were contemporary poets from Ohio.Her memorial poem, Albert Sidney Johnston, was written by Sherwood at the invitation of the Executive Committee for the Unveiling Ceremonies of the General Albert Sidney Johnston Equestrian Statue, held under the auspices of the Army of the Tennessee Louisiana Division (Ex-Confederate) at New Orleans.

List of Little League Softball World Series champions by division

This article details the list of girls' Little League Softball World Series winners by division. There are currently three girls' Softball World Series tournaments conducted each summer by Little League Baseball and Softball (also known as Little League International). (There are also three boys' Softball World Series tournaments played each summer.)

Matt Marraccini

Matt Marraccini (born May 12, 1981 Poland, Ohio) is an American actor.

Marraccini made a guest spot on costars Kirsten Storms (who's also on General Hospital) now canceled CBS show Clubhouse. He has starred in two movies, 2004 Death Valley: The Revenge of Bloody Bill, and 2005 Believers Among Us.

He played undercover cop Jesse Beaudry on General Hospital beginning in June 2005 but was let go from the soap after only a year. Jesse was killed off in 2006.

Poland Seminary

Poland Seminary, originally Poland Academy, was a name used for a series of schools operated in Poland, Ohio.

Poland Seminary High School

Poland Seminary High School is a public high school in Poland, Ohio, United States. It is the only secondary school in the Poland Local School District. Athletic teams compete as the Poland Seminary Bulldogs in the Ohio High School Athletic Association as a member of the All-American Conference.

Ralph Palmer Agnew

Ralph Palmer Agnew (December 29, 1900 — October 16, 1986) was an American mathematician.

Agnew was born in Poland, Ohio, and did his undergraduate studies at Allegheny College. After completing a master's degree at Iowa State College he moved to Cornell University, where he received a Ph.D. in 1930.

He was appointed to the Cornell faculty in 1931. He chaired the mathematics department at Cornell from 1940 to 1950, and was responsible for bringing William Feller and Mark Kac to Cornell.

His research concerned summability of series; he also wrote textbooks on calculus and differential equations.

South Main Street District

South Main Street District may refer to:

South Main Street District (Middletown, Ohio)

South Main Street District (Poland, Ohio), listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main Street Historic District

South Main Street Historic District may refer to:

South Main Street Apartments Historic District, Little Rock, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main Street Commercial Historic District (Little Rock, Arkansas)

South Main Street Residential Historic District (Little Rock, Arkansas), listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main and Washington Streets Historic District, Norwalk, Connecticut

South Main-South Lee Streets Historic District, Fitzgerald, Georgia

South Main Street Historic District (Statesboro, Georgia), listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main Street Residential Historic District (Statesboro, Georgia)

South Main Street Historic District (Watkinsville, Georgia), listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main and South Elm Streets Historic District, Henderson, Kentucky, listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main Street Historic District (Versailles, Kentucky), listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main Street Historic District (Walton, Kentucky), listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main Historic District (Grenada, Mississippi), listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main Street Historic District (Fayette, Missouri), listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main Street Historic District (Joplin, Missouri), listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main Street Historic District (Kernersville, North Carolina), listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main Street Historic District (Geneva, New York)

South Main Street Historic District (Mount Morris, New York)

South Main Street District (Middletown, Ohio)

South Main Street District (Poland, Ohio), listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main Street Commercial Historic District (Pendleton, Oregon), listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main Street Historic District (Coventry, Rhode Island)

South Main Street Historic District (Woonsocket, Rhode Island)

South Main Historic District (Bishopville, South Carolina)

South Main Street Historic District (Covington, Tennessee), listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main Street Historic District (Pikeville, Tennessee) listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main Street Historic District (Fort Worth, Texas) listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main Street Historic District (Fond du Lac, Wisconsin), listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main Street Historic District (Janesville, Wisconsin), listed on the National Register of Historic Places

South Main Street Historic District (Oregon, Wisconsin), listed on the National Register of Historic Places

William McKinley

William McKinley (January 29, 1843 – September 14, 1901) was the 25th president of the United States, serving from March 4, 1897, until his assassination six months into his second term. McKinley led the nation to victory in the Spanish–American War, raised protective tariffs to promote American industry and kept the nation on the gold standard in a rejection of free silver (effectively, expansionary monetary policy).

McKinley was the last president to have served in the American Civil War and the only one to have started the war as an enlisted soldier, beginning as a private in the Union Army and ending as a brevet major. After the war, he settled in Canton, Ohio, where he practiced law and married Ida Saxton. In 1876, he was elected to Congress, where he became the Republican Party's expert on the protective tariff, which he promised would bring prosperity. His 1890 McKinley Tariff was highly controversial, which together with a Democratic redistricting aimed at gerrymandering him out of office led to his defeat in the Democratic landslide of 1890. He was elected governor of Ohio in 1891 and 1893, steering a moderate course between capital and labor interests. With the aid of his close adviser Mark Hanna, he secured the Republican nomination for president in 1896 amid a deep economic depression. He defeated his Democratic rival William Jennings Bryan after a front porch campaign in which he advocated "sound money" (the gold standard unless altered by international agreement) and promised that high tariffs would restore prosperity.

Rapid economic growth marked McKinley's presidency. He promoted the 1897 Dingley Tariff to protect manufacturers and factory workers from foreign competition and in 1900 secured the passage of the Gold Standard Act. McKinley hoped to persuade Spain to grant independence to rebellious Cuba without conflict, but when negotiation failed he led the nation into the Spanish–American War of 1898—the United States victory was quick and decisive. As part of the peace settlement, Spain turned over to the United States its main overseas colonies of Puerto Rico, Guam and the Philippines while Cuba was promised independence, but at that time remained under the control of the United States Army. The United States annexed the independent Republic of Hawaii in 1898 and it became a United States territory.

Historians regard McKinley's 1896 victory as a realigning election in which the political stalemate of the post-Civil War era gave way to the Republican-dominated Fourth Party System, which began with the Progressive Era. McKinley defeated Bryan again in the 1900 presidential election in a campaign focused on imperialism, protectionism and free silver. His legacy was suddenly cut short when he was shot on September 6, 1901 by Leon Czolgosz, a second-generation Polish-American with anarchist leanings. McKinley died eight days later and was succeeded by his Vice President Theodore Roosevelt. As an innovator of American interventionism and pro-business sentiment, McKinley's presidency is generally considered above average, though his highly positive public perception was soon overshadowed by Roosevelt.

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