Pnoepyga

Pnoepyga is a genus of passerines endemic to southern and south eastern Asia. Its members are known as wren-babblers or cupwings. The genus contains five species. The genus has long been placed in the babbler family Timaliidae. A 2009 study of the DNA of the families Timaliidae and the Old World warblers (Sylviidae) found no support for the placement of the genus in either family, prompting the authors to erect a new monogeneric family, the Pnoepygidae.[1]

This genus of diminutive passerines has a mostly montane distribution in South and South East Asia. The scaly-breasted wren-babbler or scaly-breasted cupwing is found in the mountainous areas of north India eastwards to southern China and northern Vietnam. The Taiwan wren-babbler or Taiwan cupwing is endemic to Taiwan, and similarly the Nepal wren-babbler or Nepal cupwing has a restricted distribution, mostly occurring in Nepal (and also slightly into India). The most widespread species is the pygmy wren-babbler or pygmy cupwing, which occurs from China and India south through Southeast Asia into the Malay Peninsula and Indonesia as far as Flores and Timor.[2]

Pnoepyga
Scaly-breasted Wren Babbler I IMG 6872
Scaly-breasted wren-babbler (Pnoepyga albiventer)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Pnoepygidae
Genus: Pnoepyga
Hodgson, 1844

Species

It contains the following species:

References

  1. ^ Gelang, Magnus; Cibois, Alice; Pasquet, Eric; Olsson, Urban; Alström, Per; Ericson, Per G. P. (2009). "Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification". Zoologica Scripta. 38 (3): 225–236. doi:10.1111/j.1463-6409.2008.00374.x.
  2. ^ Collar, N. J. & Robson, C. 2007. Family Timaliidae (Babblers) pp. 70 - 291 in; del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A. & Christie, D.A. eds. Handbook of the Birds of the World, Vol. 12. Picathartes to Tits and Chickadees. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
Bar-winged wren-babbler

The bar-winged wren-babbler (Spelaeornis troglodytoides) is a species of bird in the Timaliidae family.

There are variations among the populations and three subspecies are named.

sherriffi Kinnear, 1934 from eastern Bhutan and Arunachal Pradesh

indiraji Ripley et al., 1991 from Arunachal Pradesh (Namdapha National Park) which is named after Indira Gandhi.

souliei Oustalet, 1898 - northern Arunachal Pradesh (NE India) Myanmar and S ChinaIt is found in Bhutan, China, India, and Myanmar. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.

Chinese wren-babbler

The Chinese wren-babbler or Chinese cupwing (Pnoepyga mutica) is a species of bird in the family Pnoepygidae.

It is found in southern-central China. Its natural habitats are temperate forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.

Common cuckoo

The common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) is a member of the cuckoo order of birds, Cuculiformes, which includes the roadrunners, the anis and the coucals.

This species is a widespread summer migrant to Europe and Asia, and winters in Africa. It is a brood parasite, which means it lays eggs in the nests of other bird species, particularly of dunnocks, meadow pipits, and reed warblers. Although its eggs are larger than those of its hosts, the eggs in each type of host nest resemble the host's eggs. The adult too is a mimic, in its case of the sparrowhawk; since that species is a predator, the mimicry gives the female time to lay her eggs without being seen to do so.

Eastern Himalayan subalpine conifer forests

The Eastern Himalayan subalpine conifer forests is a temperate coniferous forests ecoregion which is found in the middle and upper elevations of the eastern Middle Himalayas, in western Nepal, Bhutan and northern Indian states including Arunachal Pradesh.

List of birds of Asia

The birds of Asia are diverse.

The taxonomy of this list adheres to James Clements' Birds of the World: A Checklist, 6th edition. Taxonomic changes are on-going. As more research is gathered from studies of distribution, behaviour, and DNA, the order and number of families and species may change. Furthermore, different approaches to ornithological nomenclature have led to concurrent systems of classification (see Sibley-Ahlquist taxonomy).

The area covered by this list corresponds with the Asian listing area as defined by the American Birding Association[1]. The area includes Russia east of the Ural River and Ural Mountains and the Russian Arctic islands east of but not including Novaya Zemlya, as well as Kazakhstan, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Turkey (except for the portion north of the Bosporus, Sea of Marmara and the Dardanelles) and Cyprus. The area is separated from Africa by the Suez Canal. In the Indian Ocean it includes Sri Lanka, Lakshadweep (the Laccadive Islands), the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, but does not include Socotra (Africa), the Maldives, the Chagos Archipelago and Christmas Island (all Indian Ocean). It includes the Russian islands in the Bering Sea and North Pacific. Japan, the Izu Islands (except Nampo Shoto and the Daitō Islands), the Ryukyu Islands, Taiwan, the Philippines, Malaysia and most of Indonesia. In Indonesia, the dividing line between Asia and Australasia runs through the Banda and Molucca Seas with Sulawesi, Banggai and Talaud on the Asian side, and the islands of Kai, Ceram, Buru, the Sula Group and Morotai on the Australasian side.

List of birds of Bhutan

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Bhutan. The avifauna of Bhutan include a total of 680 species, of which two have been introduced by humans and six are rare or accidental. Twenty-two species are globally threatened.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Bhutan.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The commonly occurring native species do not fall into any of these categories.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Bhutan

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Bhutan as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of China

This is a list of the bird species recorded in China. The avifauna of China include a total of 1314 species, of which 52 are endemic, two have been introduced by humans, and 56 species listed are accidental. Of these, 87 species are globally threatened.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for China.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The commonly occurring native species do not fall into any of these categories.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in China

(E) Endemic - a species native or restricted to China

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to China as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of India

This is a list of the bird species of India and includes extant and recently extinct species recorded within the political limits of the Republic of India as defined by the Indian government are known to have around 1266 species as of 2016, of which sixty-one are endemic to the country, one has been introduced by humans and twenty-five are rare or accidental. Two species are suspected have been extirpated in India and eighty-two species are globally threatened. The Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus) is the national bird of India. This list does not cover species in Indian jurisdiction areas such as Dakshin Gangothri and oceanic species are delineated by an arbitrary cutoff distance. The list does not include fossil bird species or escapees from captivity.

Two of the most recently discovered birds of India are the Himalayan forest thrush and Bugun liocichla both discovered in Arunachal Pradesh in 2016 and 2006. Also, a few birds considered to be extinct, such as the Jerdon's courser, have been rediscovered. Several species have been elevated from subspecies to full species.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The commonly occurring native species do not fit within any of these categories.

(A) Accidental - Also known as a rarity, it refers to a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in India-typically less than ten confirmed records.

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to India

(Ex) Extirpated - a species that no longer occurs in India although populations exist elsewhere

(NB) Non-breeding range

List of birds of Nepal

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Nepal. The avifauna of Nepal include a total of about 900 species (886 species recorded) which are 9% of the total bird found in the world, of which two are endemic, one has been introduced by humans and 74 are rare or accidental. Thirty-two species are globally threatened.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Nepal.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The commonly occurring native species do not fall into any of these categories.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Nepal

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Nepal

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Nepal as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of Sumatra

Sumatra is one of the richest islands in Indonesia for animals. Its bird total species is second only to New Guinea. This great wealth is due to the large size of Sumatra, its diversity of habitat and also its past link with the Asian mainland. This following list of birds is based on the taxonomic treatment and scientific nomenclature of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition.

List of birds of Vietnam

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Vietnam. The avifauna of Vietnam include a total of 848 species, of which thirteen are endemic, three have been introduced by humans and nine are rare or accidental. One species listed is extirpated in Vietnam and is not included in the species count. Forty-three species are globally threatened.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Vietnam.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The commonly occurring native species do not fall into any of these categories.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Vietnam

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Vietnam

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Vietnam as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

(Ex) Extirpated - a species that no longer occurs in Vietnam although populations exist elsewhere

List of endemic birds of the Himalayas

This article is one of a series providing information about endemism among birds in the world's various zoogeographic zones. For an overview of this subject see Endemism in birds.

Nepal wren-babbler

The Nepal wren-babbler or immaculate cupwing (Pnoepyga immaculata) is a species of bird in the family Pnoepygidae.

It is found in Uttarakhand and Nepal.

Its natural habitats are temperate forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.

Pygmy wren-babbler

The pygmy wren-babbler or pygmy cupwing (Pnoepyga pusilla) is a species of bird in the Pnoepyga wren-babblers family, Pnoepygidae. It is found in southern and eastern Asia from the Himalayas to the Lesser Sunda Islands. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest and subtropical or tropical moist montane forest.

Scaly-breasted wren-babbler

The scaly-breasted wren-babbler or scaly-breasted cupwing (Pnoepyga albiventer) is a species of bird in the Pnoepyga wren-babblers family, Pnoepygidae. It is found in southern and eastern Asia from the Himalayas to Indochina.

Sibley-Monroe checklist 16

The Sibley-Monroe checklist was a landmark document in the study of birds. It drew on extensive DNA-DNA hybridisation studies to reassess the relationships between modern birds.

Taiwan wren-babbler

The Taiwan wren-babbler or Taiwan cupwing (Pnoepyga formosana) is a species of passerine bird in the family Pnoepygidae. The species is endemic to the island of Taiwan. It was treated for a long time as a subspecies of the scaly-breasted wren-babbler.

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