Plesiochelys

Plesiochelys is a genus of late Jurassic European and Asian turtle. The type and sole currently valid species is Plesiochelys etalloni.[1]

Plesiochelys latiscutata
Fossil of Plesiochelys

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A recent study[3] placed Plesiochelys as an Angolachelonia and outside Testudines.

Plesiochelys etalloni
Temporal range: Jurassic, Kimmeridgian–Tithonian[1]
Plesiochelys holotype
Holotype shell of Plesiochelys. The shell is mounted upside-down
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Class:
Order:
Suborder:
Infraorder:
(unranked):
Genus:
Plesiochelys

Rütimeyer, 1873
Species:
P. etalloni
Binomial name
Emys etalloni
Pictet & Humbert, 1857
Other species

Plesiochelys bigleri
Püntener, Anquetin & Billon-Bruyat, 2017[2]

Synonyms[1]
  • Emys etalloni Pictet & Humbert, 1857
  • Plesiochelys solodurensis Rütimeyer, 1873
  • Plesiochelys sanctaeverenae Rütimeyer, 1873
  • Plesiochelys langii Rütimeyer, 1873

References

  1. ^ a b c Anquetin, J. R. M.; Deschamps, S.; Claude, J. (2014). "The rediscovery and redescription of the holotype of the Late Jurassic turtle Plesiochelys etalloni". PeerJ. 2: e258. doi:10.7717/peerj.258. PMC 3932733. PMID 24688842.
  2. ^ Christian Püntener; Jérémy Anquetin; Jean-Paul Billon-Bruyat (2017). "The comparative osteology of Plesiochelys bigleri n. sp., a new coastal marine turtle from the Late Jurassic of Porrentruy (Switzerland)". PeerJ. 5: e3482. doi:10.7717/peerj.3482. PMC 5493033. PMID 28674653.
  3. ^ Evers, S. W., & Benson, R. B. (2019). A new phylogenetic hypothesis of turtles with implications for the timing and number of evolutionary transitions to marine lifestyles in the group. Palaeontology, 62(1), 93-134.

Sources

  • Gaffney, Eugene S. "A taxonomic revision of the Jurassic turtles Portlandemys and Plesiochelys. American Museum Novitates; no. 2574." (1975).

External links

2013 in paleontology

Paleontology or palaeontology (from Greek: paleo, "ancient"; ontos, "being"; and logos, "knowledge") is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth through the examination of plant and animal fossils. This includes the study of body fossils, tracks (ichnites), burrows, cast-off parts, fossilised feces (coprolites), palynomorphs and chemical residues. Because humans have encountered fossils for millennia, paleontology has a long history both before and after becoming formalized as a science. This article records significant discoveries and events related to paleontology that occurred or were published in the year 2013.

2014 in paleontology

Paleontology or palaeontology (from Greek: paleo, "ancient"; ontos, "being"; and logos, "knowledge") is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth through the examination of plant and animal fossils. This includes the study of body fossils, tracks (ichnites), burrows, cast-off parts, fossilised feces (coprolites), palynomorphs and chemical residues. Because humans have encountered fossils for millennia, paleontology has a long history both before and after becoming formalized as a science. This article records significant discoveries and events related to paleontology that occurred or were published in the year 2014.

2016 in paleontology

Paleontology or palaeontology (from Greek: paleo, "ancient"; ontos, "being"; and logos, "knowledge") is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth through the examination of plant and animal fossils. This includes the study of body fossils, tracks (ichnites), burrows, cast-off parts, fossilised feces (coprolites), palynomorphs and chemical residues. Because humans have encountered fossils for millennia, paleontology has a long history both before and after becoming formalized as a science. This article records significant discoveries and events related to paleontology that occurred or were published in the year 2016.

2017 in paleontology

Paleontology or palaeontology (from Greek: paleo, "ancient"; ontos, "being"; and logos, "knowledge") is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth through the examination of plant and animal fossils. This includes the study of body fossils, tracks (ichnites), burrows, cast-off parts, fossilised feces (coprolites), palynomorphs and chemical residues. Because humans have encountered fossils for millennia, paleontology has a long history both before and after becoming formalized as a science. This article records significant discoveries and events related to paleontology that occurred or were published in the year 2017.

2019 in paleontology

Paleontology or palaeontology (from Greek: paleo, "ancient"; ontos, "being"; and logos, "knowledge") is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth through the examination of plant and animal fossils. This includes the study of body fossils, tracks (ichnites), burrows, cast-off parts, fossilised feces (coprolites), palynomorphs and chemical residues. Because humans have encountered fossils for millennia, paleontology has a long history both before and after becoming formalized as a science. This article records significant discoveries and events related to paleontology that occurred or were published in the year 2019.

Angolachelys

Angolachelys is an extinct genus of African eucryptodiran turtle which existed in Angola during the Turonian stage of the Late Cretaceous. The type species is Angolachelys mbaxi. The type MGUAN-PA includes skull, jaw, and postcranial fragments found in the Tadi Beds of the Itombe Formation. The genus is the basis for the clade name Angolachelonia, the sister-taxon of Testudines.

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Hoyasemys

Hoyasemys (meaning "turtle of Las Hoyas") is an extinct genus of basal eucryptodiran freshwater turtle from Lower Cretaceous (upper Barremian stage) deposits of Cuenca Province, Spain. It is known from the holotype MCCM-LH 84, a nearly complete and articulated skeleton including the skull. It was found in the 1980s from the Las Hoyas site of the Calizas de La Huérguina Formation, near La Cierva township, Spain. It was first named by Adán Pérez-García, Marcelo S. de la Fuente and Francisco Ortega in 2011 and the type species is Hoyasemys jimenezi. The generic name is derived from the word Hoyas meaning "the basin" in Spanish, which refers to the Las Hoyas fossil site it was found in, and emys ("freshwater turtle" in Greek). The specific name honors Dr. Emiliano Jiménez Fuentes.

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