PlayStation Network

PlayStation Network (PSN) is a digital media entertainment service provided by Sony Interactive Entertainment. Launched in November 2006, PSN was originally conceived for the PlayStation video game consoles, but soon extended to encompass smartphones, tablets, Blu-ray players and high-definition televisions. As of April 2016, over 110 million users have been documented, with 90 million of them active monthly as of November 2018.[2][3]

PlayStation Network's services are dedicated to an online marketplace (PlayStation Store), a premium subscription service for enhanced gaming and social features (PlayStation Plus), movie streaming, rentals and purchases (PlayStation Video), a cloud-based television programming service (PlayStation Vue), music streaming (PlayStation Music, powered by Spotify) and a cloud gaming service (PlayStation Now). The service is available in 73 territories.[4]

PlayStation Network
PlayStation Network logo
DeveloperSony Interactive Entertainment
TypeOnline service
Launch dateNovember 11, 2006
PlatformVideo game consoles and handhelds Social Devices
Members90 million active monthly (as of November, 2018)[1]
WebsiteOfficial website

History

Launched in the year 2000, Sony's second home console, the PlayStation 2, had rudimentary online features in select games via its online network. It required a network adaptor, which was available as an add-on for original models and integrated into the hardware on slimline models. However, Sony provided no unified service for the system, so support for network features was specific to each game and third-party server, and there was no interoperability of cross-game presence. Five years later during the development stage for its third home console, the PlayStation 3, Sony expressed their intent to build upon the functionality of its predecessor by creating a new interconnected service that keeps users constantly in touch with a "PlayStation World" network.[5] In March 2006, Sony officially introduced its unified online service, tentatively named "PlayStation Network Platform".[6] A list of supporting features was announced at the Tokyo Game Show later the same year.[7]

Sony launched an optional premium subscription service on top of the free PSN service in June 2010. Known as PlayStation Plus, the system provides access to exclusive content, complimentary games, regular store discounts, and early access to forthcoming games.

Following a security intrusion, the PlayStation Network had a temporary suspension of operation which began on April 20, 2011 and affected 77 million registered accounts.[8] Lasting 23 days, this outage was the longest amount of time the PSN had been offline since its inception in 2006.[9] Sony reported that user data had been obtained during the intrusion.[10] In June 2011, Sony launched a "Welcome Back" program following the outage, allowing all PSN subscribers who joined prior to April 20 to download two free PlayStation 3 titles and two free PlayStation Portable games. Users also received 30 free days of PlayStation Plus, while users who were already subscribed before the outage got 60 free days.[11] After the disruption, Sony changed the PlayStation Network's license agreement to legally bar users from filing lawsuits and joining class action lawsuits without first trying to resolve issues with an arbitrator.[12]

In July 2012, Sony Computer Entertainment announced that they had acquired video game streaming service Gaikai for $380 million. The acquisition was later strengthened when Sony acquired the assets of Gaikai's market rival OnLive. At the Consumer Electronics Show in January 2014, Sony announced that Gaikai's technology would be used to power PlayStation Now; a new cloud-based gaming service that allows people to play PlayStation games on a variety of devices. During 2014, Sony rolled out the service in North America on PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 4 in beta form as a means for users to test performance and pricing structures.[13]

On December 25, 2014, PlayStation Network and Xbox Live suffered network disruption after a denial-of-service attack.[14] Both services were flooded with millions of inauthentic connection requests, making it hard for genuine users to establish a connection. Functionality was restored on December 26, with some users experiencing difficulties in the days that followed.[15] On January 1, 2015, Sony announced that users would be compensated for the downtime with a 5-day extension to PlayStation Plus memberships.[16]

Formerly the gaming provision of the much broader Sony Entertainment Network, the PlayStation Network became Sony's premier entertainment service in 2015, unifying games, music, television and video. While synonymous with gaming, Sony said the PlayStation Network had evolved to become a "comprehensive digital entertainment brand".[17] The SEN name is still used in some places.

User information

Signing up to the PlayStation Network is free. Two types of accounts can be created: Master accounts and Sub accounts.[18] A master account allows full access to all settings, including parental controls. Sub accounts can subsequently be created (e.g. for children) with desired restrictions set by the master account holder.[19] A sub account holder has the option to upgrade their account once they reach 18 years of age.[20] Sony encourage registrants to use a unique email and strong password not associated with other online services.[21][22]

Online ID

An Online ID is one's username on the PlayStation Network. It can range from 3 to 16 characters in length and consist of letters, numbers, hyphens and underscores. A user's Online ID is central to your PSN profile and is displayed when playing online games and using other network features.[23]

Users have the option to disclose their real name aside their Online ID, add a personal description, exhibit a profile picture or avatar, and list all spoken languages. Profiles also include a summary of a player's Trophy level and recent activity. PlayStation 4 users have the additional option to tie a Facebook account to their PlayStation Network account, and their profile picture will automatically update whenever they change their Facebook picture. Profiles can be viewed via the user interface or online through the PlayStation website.

A Portable ID is a small infographic intended for use as a forum signature. The graphic showcases a user's trophy level and number of trophies awarded. Each user is able to log into their PSN account using a web browser to access and customize their Portable ID, and are then given a unique URL which they can cut & paste to display their ID elsewhere on the internet.[24] Several third-party websites offer similar graphics (commonly referred to as "trophy cards") as both free and paid services which either update automatically or are updated manually by the user.[25]

Trophies

Trophies are in-game awards presented to gamers for hitting specific targets or reaching certain milestones (e.g. completing a difficult level or defeating a certain number of enemies). There are four different types of trophy awarded. A bronze, silver, or gold trophy is contingent upon the difficulty of the accomplishment, with each reward contributing to a level system attached to a player's profile. A platinum trophy is awarded to the player once they unlock all other trophies in the base game; smaller sized games, however, generally do not have a platinum trophy. In addition, each trophy is graded by popularity—common, rare, very rare, and ultra rare—based on the percentage of people who have unlocked it. Developers can choose to make various trophies hidden so that its value and description are not revealed until after the user has obtained it.[26]

PlayStation Plus

PlayStation Plus
PlayStationPlus
DeveloperSony Computer Entertainment
TypePremium online service
Launch dateJune 29, 2010
Last updatedMay 1, 2018
PlatformPlayStation 3
PlayStation 4
PlayStation Vita
Members36.3 million (as of December 31, 2018)[27]
Websitewww.playstationplus.com

PlayStation Plus, abbreviated to PS Plus, is a paid-for PlayStation Network subscription service that provides users with access to premium features. These extras include early access to upcoming games, beta trials, regular store discounts, and the ability to have system software updates and game patches download automatically to the console. As part of the subscription, members are given six games every month—typically two for each platform—and 100 GB of internet storage space for up to 1,000 saved game files. PlayStation 4 online multiplayer requires a subscription to PlayStation Plus.[28] Users may choose a monthly, quarterly or annual subscription.[29]

Monthly games

Membership includes access to a rolling selection of games. New titles are made available every month, while older games are withdrawn from the collection. Members can keep all games in the Instant Game Collection as long as they are a member of PlayStation Plus. If their membership lapses, these games will become locked and unplayable. However, once the membership is renewed, the games will become unlocked again. The longer a user is a member, the larger their game collection will become.[30] In 2014, PlayStation Plus provided more than US$1,300 worth of games in the Instant Game Collection.[31]

PlayStation Store

The PlayStation Store is a digital media shop that offers a range of downloadable content both for purchase and available free of charge. This includes full games, free-to-play games, add-ons, demos, music, movies and background themes. The store is updated with new releases each Tuesday in North America and each Wednesday in PAL regions. The store accepts physical currency, PayPal transfers and network cards.[32]

PlayStation Network Cards are a form of electronic money that can be used with the PlayStation Store.[33] Each card, or ticket, contains an alphanumeric code which can be entered on the PlayStation Network to deposit credit in a virtual wallet. Sony devised the payment method for people without access to a credit card, and PlayStation owners who would like to send or receive such cards as gifts.[34] The tickets are available via online retailers, convenience stores, electronic kiosks and post office ATMs.

Sony introduced 'cross-buy' in 2012, whereby a game available for multiple PlayStation devices needs only to be purchased once. Players who download the PlayStation 3 version of a game can also transfer to the PlayStation Vita or PlayStation 4 version, at no extra cost, and vice versa. Users have immediate access to supported titles in their digital game library, even when they upgrade to the newest system.[35]

PlayStation Blog

The PlayStation Blog is an online PlayStation focused gaming blog which is part of the PlayStation Network. Launched in June 2007, regular content includes game announcements, developer interviews and store updates.[36] A sub-site of the blog called PlayStation.Blog Share was launched in March 2010 and allows PSN users to submit ideas to the PlayStation team about anything PlayStation-related as well as vote on the ideas of other submissions.[37][38]

Original programming

Beginning in the spring of 2015, PlayStation Network begin to produce and distribute their own original content. The first original scripted program, Powers, premiered on March 10, 2015 and ran for two full seasons.[39] The series was cancelled on August 3, 2016.[40]

In June 2017, it was announced that Sony was launching the Emerging Filmmakers Program where members of the public can submit pitches for potential television series to be aired on PlayStation Network. Submissions were due on August 1, 2017 and five of the ideas would be turned into pilot episodes that will be voted on by the PlayStation community.[41]

See also

References

  1. ^ https://comicbook.com/gaming/2019/01/08/sony-91-million-playstation-4-systems-sold-worldwide-ps4/
  2. ^ https://comicbook.com/gaming/2019/01/08/sony-91-million-playstation-4-systems-sold-worldwide-ps4/
  3. ^ "Number of registered PlayStation Network accounts reaches 110 million". PlayStationLifeStyle. 3 July 2013. Retrieved 7 April 2015.
  4. ^ PlayStation country selector, playstation.com
  5. ^ Tor Thorsen. PlayStation 3 announced for 2006, GameSpot, May 16, 2005.
  6. ^ Hirohiko Niizumi. PlayStation Network Platform detailed, GameSpot, March 15, 2006.
  7. ^ Shoemaker, Brad (2006-09-21). "Sony TGS 2006 keynote speech". GameSpot. Retrieved 2008-01-15.
  8. ^ "PlayStation Network and Qriocity Outage FAQ – PlayStation.Blog.Europe". Blog.eu.playstation.com. Retrieved 2011-05-12.
  9. ^ "PlayStation Knowledge Center | Support - PlayStation.com". Us.playstation.com. 2011-01-10. Retrieved 2011-05-12.
  10. ^ "Update on PlayStation Network and Qriocity". SCEA PlayStation. 2011-04-26. Retrieved 2011-04-26.
  11. ^ Brett Molina, USA Today. "Sony launches 'Welcome Back' program for PSN users." June 3, 2011. Retrieved June 3, 2011.
  12. ^ "Sony asks gamers to sign new terms or face PSN ban". BBC News. London. 2011-09-16. Retrieved September 19, 2011.
  13. ^ Eric Johnson. Sony Acquires OnLive’s Cloud Gaming Patents, recode.net, April 2, 2015.
  14. ^ Ghoshal, Abhimanyu (25 December 2014). "PlayStation Network and Xbox Live down for many over Christmas". TheNextWeb.com. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  15. ^ Jensen, Catherine (27 December 2014). "PlayStation Network Update". PlayStation Blog. Retrieved 28 December 2014.
  16. ^ Martin, Michael (January 1, 2015). "Sony rewards PSN users' patience with free five day extension". IGN. Retrieved January 1, 2015.
  17. ^ Sal Romano. PlayStation Network becomes center of Sony entertainment services, gematsu.com, January 28, 2015.
  18. ^ Sub accounts and master accounts, playstation.com
  19. ^ Limitations of Sub Accounts, playstation.com, November 21. 2014.
  20. ^ Eric Lempel. Upgrade Sub Accounts to Master Accounts, playstation.com, February 12, 2015.
  21. ^ Password Requirements, PlayStation Network
  22. ^ Brendan Sinclair. Sony asks users to reset passwords, gamesindustry.biz, December 5, 2013. "We encourage you to create a complex unique password that you have not used before or isn't the same password as those associated with other online services."
  23. ^ Yin-Poole, Wesley (October 10, 2018). "Sony will let you change your PSN ID early 2019". Eurogamer. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  24. ^ Ed Easton. Design Your Own Portable ID, blog.playstation.com, 21 April 2011.
  25. ^ "PS3 Trophy Card Generator". PS3Trophies.com.
  26. ^ "Firmware v2.40 Walkthrough Part 2: The XMB". Sony. 2008-06-30. Retrieved 2008-06-30.
  27. ^ https://gematsu.com/2019/02/ps4-worldwide-shipments-top-94-2-million
  28. ^ E3 2013: PlayStation Plus Required for PS4 Online Play. IGN (2013-06-10). Retrieved on 2013-08-23.
  29. ^ Jim Reilly (June 24, 2010). "First PlayStation Plus Details". IGN. Retrieved July 5, 2010.
  30. ^ PlayStation Plus Introduction. support.us.playstation.com. Retrieved on 2013-08-23.
  31. ^ Good, Owen S. (13 December 2014). "PlayStation Plus gave away more than $1,300 in free games in 2014". Polygon.com. Retrieved 13 December 2014.
  32. ^ "Sony "Leveraging" PSN Services for Other Sony Electronics". 1UP.com. 2010-07-01. Archived from the original on 2013-01-16. Retrieved 2010-07-01.
  33. ^ PlayStation Network cards, playstation.com
  34. ^ Lempel, Eric (2007-12-14). "PlayStation Network Cards are coming". PlayStation Blog. Retrieved 2008-01-15.
  35. ^ Chris Reed. Cross-Buy, Cross-Save, and Remote Play Explained, cheatsheet.com, March 30, 2015.
  36. ^ Patrick Seybold (June 11, 2007). "Welcome, You've Been Waiting". PlayStation.Blog. Retrieved March 25, 2010.
  37. ^ PlayStation.Blog Share, share.blog.us.playstation.com
  38. ^ Patrick Seybold (March 17, 2010). "Introducing PlayStation.Blog Share". PlayStation.Blog. Retrieved March 25, 2010.
  39. ^ Bendis, Brian. "Powers Premieres March 10th, Only on PlayStation". Playstation. Retrieved January 20, 2015.
  40. ^ "'Powers' canceled by PlayStation Network". August 3, 2016.
  41. ^ Cooper, Daniel. "Sony crowdsources ideas for its next PlayStation TV series". Engadget. Retrieved 25 November 2017.

External links

2011 PlayStation Network outage

The 2011 PlayStation Network outage was the result of an "external intrusion" on Sony's PlayStation Network and Qriocity services, in which personal details from approximately 77 million accounts were compromised and prevented users of PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Portable consoles from accessing the service. The attack occurred between April 17 and April 19, 2011, forcing Sony to turn off the PlayStation Network on April 20. On May 4 Sony confirmed that personally identifiable information from each of the 77 million accounts had been exposed. The outage lasted 23 days.At the time of the outage, with a count of 77 million registered PlayStation Network accounts, it was one of the largest data security breaches in history. It surpassed the 2007 TJX hack which affected 45 million customers. Government officials in various countries voiced concern over the theft and Sony's one-week delay before warning its users.

Sony stated on April 26 that it was attempting to get online services running "within a week." On May 14, Sony released PlayStation 3 firmware version 3.61 as a security patch. The firmware required users to change their password upon signing in. At the time the firmware was released, the network was still offline. Regional restoration was announced by Kazuo Hirai in a video from Sony. A map of regional restoration and the network within the United States was shared as the service was coming back online.

Central Station (online gaming service)

Central Station was the main portal by Sony Computer Entertainment Europe for PAL regions in the PlayStation 2 era.

The service allowed users to view new game releases, change account details, read the latest PlayStation-related news and enter online events for the PlayStation 2 and PlayStation Portable consoles.

Central Station was superseded by the worldwide PlayStation Network upon release of the PlayStation 3 but it was discontinued.

Echochrome

Echochrome (stylized as echochrome), released in Japan as Mugen Kairō (無限回廊), is a puzzle game created by Sony's Japan Studio and Game Yarouze, which is available for PlayStation 3 from the PlayStation Store and for PlayStation Portable (PSP) on either UMD or from the PlayStation Store. Gameplay involves a mannequin figure traversing a rotatable world where physics and reality depend on perspective. The world is occupied by Oscar Reutersvärd's impossible constructions. This concept is inspired by M. C. Escher's artwork, such as "Relativity". The game is based on the Object Locative Environment Coordinate System developed by Jun Fujiki—an engine that determines what is occurring based on the camera's perspective.

The game was first announced at E3 2007. The game was released in Japan on March 19, 2008 on UMD and for download on the PlayStation Store with a demo released on the Japanese PlayStation Network on March 6, 2008. The North American release of Echochrome is only available on the PlayStation Network. A demo was released in North America on April 24, 2008. It was followed by the full version on May 1, 2008. Updates that rotate the set of user created levels occur periodically.The game was released as a UMD in Europe on July 4, 2008, with a PlayStation Network version following on July 10. Echochrome was also a playable arcade mini-game in the Bowling Alley/Game Space of PlayStation Home. In 2011, Echochrome was released on Blu-ray as a part of the compilation Move Mind Benders with PlayStation Move support along with Lemmings and Tumble.

PlayStation 3 Trophies were made available for the console version in North America via a patch on December 11, 2008, which features 10 trophies. It includes 2 gold trophies, 1 silver trophy, and 7 bronze trophies. Europe and Japan have now received the trophy patch. A sequel to the game, Echochrome II, was released for the PlayStation 3 utilizing the PlayStation Move in December 2010. A spinoff was released on the PlayStation Portable in 2009 titled Echoshift.

Edge (video game)

Edge is a puzzle platformer game developed by Mobigame for the iOS devices. The objective is to guide a rolling cube through maze-like levels and reach the goal. Originally released on the iTunes App Store in December 2008, it has been removed and re-added to the store multiple times due to a trademark dispute with Tim Langdell of Edge Games, concerning the use of the word "Edge" in the title. This had caused the game to be renamed as Edge by Mobigame and later Edgy, before ultimately returning to the App Store under its original name in October 2009. The game was released on multiple platforms including mobile phones, PlayStation Network, Steam, macOS, Android, Wii U, and Nintendo 3DS.

Edge had obtain a positive reception and received multiple awards including the Milthon Award for Best Mobile Game, two categories for the 5th International Gaming Award, and nominated for three categories for Independent Games Festival. An expansion titled Edge Extended was released with new levels, new music, new 3D engine, and new AI dark cube. This expansion was released separately as an independent app for smartphones, and included in most ports of the original game.

List of Sony Interactive Entertainment video games

This is a list of video games for PlayStation consoles, developed or published by Sony Interactive Entertainment, formerly known as Sony Computer Entertainment.

NEOGEO Station

NEOGEO Station was a service handled by M2 for downloadable Neo Geo games that were previously available to be purchased from the PlayStation Store for Sony's PlayStation 3 (PS3), PlayStation Portable (PSP) and PlayStation Vita (PSV) video game consoles in all regions. All games in this series have been de-listed from the Playstation Store. This list does not include PlayStation games ported from Neo Geo that were released as PS One Classics.

PlayStation 3

The PlayStation 3 (PS3) is a home video game console developed by Sony Computer Entertainment. It is the successor to PlayStation 2, and is part of the PlayStation brand of consoles. It was first released on November 11, 2006, in Japan, November 17, 2006, in North America, and March 23, 2007, in Europe and Australia. The PlayStation 3 competed mainly against consoles such as Microsoft's Xbox 360 and Nintendo's Wii as part of the seventh generation of video game consoles.

The console was first officially announced at E3 2005, and was released at the end of 2006. It was the first console to use Blu-ray Disc as its primary storage medium. The console was the first PlayStation to integrate social gaming services, including the PlayStation Network, as well as the first to be controllable from a handheld console, through its remote connectivity with PlayStation Portable and PlayStation Vita. In September 2009, the Slim model of the PlayStation 3 was released. It no longer provided the hardware ability to run PS2 games. It was lighter and thinner than the original version, and featured a redesigned logo and marketing design, as well as a minor start-up change in software. A Super Slim variation was then released in late 2012, further refining and redesigning the console.

During its early years, the system had a critically negative reception, due to its high price ($599 for a 60 gigabyte model, and $499 for a 20 GB model), a complex processor architecture and a lack of quality games, but was praised for its Blu-ray capabilities and "untapped potential". The reception would get more positive over time. The system had a slow start in the market but managed to recover, particularly after the introduction of the Slim model. Its successor, the PlayStation 4, was released later in November 2013. On September 29, 2015, Sony confirmed that sales of the PlayStation 3 were to be discontinued in New Zealand, but the system remained in production in other markets. Shipments of new units to Europe and Australia ended in March 2016, followed by North America which ended in October 2016. Heading into 2017, Japan was the last territory where new units were still being produced until May 29, 2017, when Sony confirmed the PlayStation 3 was discontinued in Japan.

PlayStation App

The PlayStation App is a software application for iOS and Android devices developed by Sony Interactive Entertainment.

PlayStation Music

PlayStation Music is an on-demand streaming music service powered by Spotify. Providing free and premium access to over 30 million tracks, it is available in 41 markets via the PlayStation Network on PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xperia tablet and mobile devices. The service replaces their former music streaming service, Music Unlimited.

PlayStation Store

The PlayStation Store (also abbreviated as PSN Store) is a digital media store available to users of Sony's PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita and PlayStation Portable game consoles via the PlayStation Network. The store offers a range of downloadable content both for purchase and available free of charge. Available content includes full games, add-on content, playable demos, themes and game/movie trailers.

Powers (U.S. TV series)

Powers is an American online streaming series adaptation of the Powers comic book series published by Marvel Comics under their Icon Comics imprint. Marking PlayStation Network's first venture into scripted original programming, the series premiered on March 10, 2015. The first two episodes of the series were written by Charlie Huston and directed by David Slade. The first three episodes, (the third directed by David Petrarca), were released on March 10, 2015, on the PlayStation Network. The pilot episode is available for free for people in the USA on YouTube and the entire first season was available on Crackle until May 3, 2016. On May 6, 2015, Powers was renewed for a second season, which premiered on May 31, 2016. It was announced on August 3, 2016 that Powers had been canceled.

Qore (PlayStation Network)

Qore (pronounced like "core") was a monthly subscription-based interactive online magazine for the PlayStation Network and replaces the Jampack series of disks offered by PlayStation Underground. Available only in North America, the service offered high definition videos, interviews, and behind-the-scenes footage pertaining to upcoming and recently released PlayStation games. It also offered exclusive access to game demos and betas. The product was available to download to the PlayStation 3 from the PlayStation Store, where users were able to choose to purchase individual episodes or an annual, 13-episode subscription. PlayStation Plus subscribers received Qore free of charge for the duration of their subscription. The magazine was presented by Veronica Belmont & Audrey Cleo and later Jesse 'Blaze' Snider & Tiffany Smith.

Qore aired its 47th and final episode on April 10, 2012.

Room for PlayStation Portable

Room for PlayStation Portable (officially styled R∞M, in capital letters with an infinity symbol in the place of the two O's, also marketed as PlayStation Room) was a community-based social networking service that halted development on April 15, 2010. It was being developed by Sony Computer Entertainment Japan and was being beta tested in Japan from October 2009 to April 2010 for the PlayStation Portable on the PlayStation Network. The service was similar to the PlayStation 3's service, PlayStation Home.

Room was first announced at TGS 2009. It could be launched directly from the PlayStation Network section of the PSP's XrossMediaBar after it had been downloaded and installed onto the PSP system. Just like in Home, PSP owners would have been able to invite other PSP owners into their rooms, which were called "my rooms", to "enjoy real time communication." The service would have been free, with additional premium content available at launch. The service was to be available for all models of the PSP. Sony announced that the PSP service would allow users to create 3D avatars, room spaces, blogs, albums, and chat support.

A closed beta test occurred from October 2009 up to April 15, 2010. Selected PSP owners received an invitation and more details to participate in the closed beta test. PSP owners in Japan were able to sign up for the closed beta test from September 24, 2009, to October 5, 2009, on the Japanese website. Requirement was that they had access to the internet from their PSP and that they were 18 years or older and had a PlayStation Network master account.

Development of the service halted on April 15, 2010, due to the feedback from the community. SCE Japan thanked those who participated in the beta testing for their feedback.

Sony Entertainment Network

Sony Entertainment Network (SEN) was a digital media delivery service operated by Sony. SEN provided access to services, including PlayStation Network for games, Video Unlimited for film and television, Music Unlimited for music, and PlayMemories for photographs and videos. In 2015, the Sony Entertainment Network was superseded by the PlayStation Network, which became Sony's leading entertainment service brand.

Vib-Ribbon

Vib-Ribbon (ビブリボン, Bibu Ribon), styled as vib-ribbon, is a rhythm video game developed by NanaOn-Sha and published by Sony Computer Entertainment. It was originally released for the PlayStation in Japan on December 12, 1999, and was later released in Europe on September 1, 2000. Although the original PlayStation port was never released in North America, the game was re-released on PlayStation Network in North America in 2014.

The game was unique in that the software loaded into RAM, letting the player use any music CD to play against; the game could generate a unique level from any track. The graphics for Vib-Ribbon are simple, consisting of straight, white vector lines forming crude, angular drawings of the level and the player character, named Vibri.

Warhawk (1995 video game)

Warhawk, released as AirAssault in Japan, is a futuristic arcade-style flight-combat game for the Sony PlayStation console, developed by SingleTrac and published by Sony Computer Entertainment. It was originally released on November 10, 1995 in North America and a month later in Europe. It was later re-released as part of Sony's Greatest Hits line-up.

A Windows version slated for release in 1996 was canceled.A multiplayer-only remake of the same name has been developed by Incognito Entertainment; it was released on Blu-ray Disc and as a digital download for the PlayStation 3 on August 28, 2007.

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