Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, also known simply as the PG, is the largest newspaper serving metropolitan Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. It has won six Pulitzer Prizes since 1938.

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette logo
PG front page
The July 23, 2006, front page of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
FormatBroadsheet
Owner(s)Block Communications
PublisherJohn Robinson Block
EditorPosition currently unfilled
Founded1786 (as The Pittsburgh Gazette)
Headquarters358 North Shore Drive
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212
CountryUnited States
Circulation173,160 Daily
317,439 Sunday[1]
ISSN1068-624X
Websitewww.post-gazette.com

Early history

Post Gazette Building
The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Building in Downtown Pittsburgh, which housed the paper from 1962 to 2015.

Gazette

The Post-Gazette began its history as a four-page weekly called The Pittsburgh Gazette, first published on July 29, 1786 with the encouragement of Hugh Henry Brackenridge.[2][3] It was the first newspaper published west of the Allegheny Mountains.[2] Published by Joseph Hall and John Scull, the paper covered the start of the nation. As one of its first major articles, the Gazette published the newly adopted Constitution of the United States.[4]

In 1820, under publishers Eichbaum and Johnston and editor Morgan Neville, the name changed to Pittsburgh Gazette and Manufacturing and Mercantile Advertiser.[5] David MacLean bought the paper in 1822, and later reverted to the former title.[6]

Under combative editor Neville B. Craig, whose service lasted from 1829 to 1841, the Gazette championed the Anti-Masonic movement. Craig turned the Gazette into the city's first daily paper, issued every afternoon except Sunday starting on July 30, 1833.[7]

In 1844, shortly after absorbing the Advocate, the Gazette switched its daily issue time to morning.[8] Its editorial stance at the time was conservative and strongly favoring the Whig Party.[9] By the 1850s the Gazette was credited with helping to organize a local chapter of the new Republican Party, and with contributing to the election of Abraham Lincoln. The paper was one of the first to suggest tensions between North and South would erupt in war.[10]

After consolidating with the Commercial in 1877, the paper was again renamed and was then known as the Commercial Gazette.[11]

In 1900, George T. Oliver acquired the paper, merging it six years later with The Pittsburg Times to form The Gazette Times.[12]

Post

The Pittsburgh Post first appeared on September 10, 1842, as the Daily Morning Post.[13] It had its origin in three pro-Democratic weeklies, the Mercury, Allegheny Democrat, and American Manufacturer, which came together through a pair of mergers in the early 1840s.[14] The three papers had for years engaged in bitter editorial battles with the Gazette.[15]

Like its predecessors, the Post advocated the policies of the Democratic Party. Its political opposition to the Whig and later Republican Gazette was so enduring that an eventual combination of the two rivals would have seemed unlikely.[16]

Pittsburgh newspaper consolidation timeline
Consolidation timeline

Block-Hearst deal

The 1920s were a time of consolidation in the long-overcrowded Pittsburgh newspaper market. In 1923, local publishers banded together to acquire and kill off the Dispatch and Leader. Four years later, William Randolph Hearst negotiated with the Olivers to purchase the morning Gazette Times and its evening sister, the Chronicle Telegraph, while Paul Block arranged to buy out the owner of the morning Post and evening Sun. After swapping the Sun in return for Hearst's Gazette Times, Block had both morning papers, which he combined to form the Post-Gazette. Hearst united the evening papers, creating the Sun-Telegraph. Both new papers debuted on August 2, 1927.[17]

Joint operating agreement

In 1960, Pittsburgh had three daily papers: the Post-Gazette in the morning, and the Pittsburgh Press and the Pittsburgh Sun-Telegraph in the evening and on Sunday. The Post-Gazette bought the Sun-Telegraph and moved into the Sun-Telegraph's Grant Street offices.[18]

The Post-Gazette tried to publish a Sunday paper to compete with the Sunday Press but it was not profitable; rising costs in general were challenging the company's bottom line.[19] In November 1961, the Post-Gazette entered into an agreement with the Pittsburgh Press Company to combine their production and advertising sales operations.[20] The Post-Gazette owned and operated its own news and editorial departments, but production and distribution of the paper was handled by the larger Press office.[20] This agreement stayed in place for over 30 years.[21]

The agreement gave the Post-Gazette a new home in the Press building, a comfortable upgrade from the hated "Sun-Telly barn."[22] Constructed for the Press in 1927 and expanded with a curtain wall in 1962, the building served as the Post-Gazette headquarters until 2015.[23]

Strike, consolidation, new competition

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Distribution Center
The distribution center

On May 17, 1992, a strike by workers for the Press shut down publication of the Press; the joint operating agreement meant that the Post-Gazette also ceased to publish.[24] During the strike, the Scripps Howard company sold the Press to the Block family, owners of the Post-Gazette.[21] The Blocks did not resume printing the Press, and when the labor issue was resolved and publishing resumed, the Post-Gazette became the city's major paper, under the full masthead name Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Sun-Telegraph/The Pittsburgh Press.

The Block ownership did not take this opportunity to address labor costs, which had led to sale of the Press. This would come back to haunt them and lead to financial problems (see "Financial Challenges" below).

During the strike, publisher Richard Mellon Scaife expanded his paper, the Greensburg Tribune-Review, based in the county seat of adjoining Westmoreland County, where it had published for years. While maintaining the original paper in its facilities in Greensburg, he expanded it with a new Pittsburgh edition to serve the city and its suburbs. Scaife named this paper the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review.[25] Scaife has invested significant amounts of capital into upgraded facilities, separate offices and newsroom on Pittsburgh's North Side and a state of the art production facility in Marshall Township north of Pittsburgh in Allegheny County. Relations between the Post-Gazette and Tribune-Review, during its existence as a local print publication, were often competitive and frequently hostile, given Scaife's longstanding distaste for what he considered the Blocks' liberalism.

On November 14, 2011, the Post-Gazette revived the Pittsburgh Press as an afternoon online newspaper.[26]

On February 12, 2014, the paper purchased a new distribution facility in suburban Findlay Township, Pennsylvania.[27]

In 2015, the paper moved into a new, state-of-the-art office building on the North Shore on a portion of the former site of Three Rivers Stadium, ending 53 years in the former Press building and more than two centuries in Downtown. Block Communications, feeling that the building is being greatly underutilized considering its proximity to Point State Park, still owns the building and plans to have the property redeveloped.[28]

Community presence

Post Gazette building, October 2015
The Post-Gazette building in October 2015.

The newspaper sponsored a major 23,000 seat outdoor amphitheater in Burgettstown, Pennsylvania, the "Post-Gazette Pavilion", although it is still often referred to as "Star Lake", based on the original name, "Star Lake Amphitheater", and later "Coca-Cola Star Lake Amphitheater" under the former sponsor. They gave up naming rights in 2010.[29] First Niagara Bank, which had entered the Pittsburgh market the year before after acquiring National City branches from Pittsburgh-based PNC Financial Services,[30] took over the naming rights to the facility and is now known as the KeyBank Pavilion.[29]

The newspaper once had ventures in television. In 1957, the Post-Gazette partnered with the H. Kenneth Brennen family, local radio owners, to launch WIIC-TV (now WPXI) as the area's first full-time NBC affiliate.[31][32] The Post-Gazette and the Brennens sold off the station to current owner Cox Enterprises in 1964.[33] Although the Post-Gazette and WPXI have on occasion had some news partnerships, the Post-Gazette's primary news partner is now KDKA-TV.

Financial challenges

In September 2006, the paper disclosed that it was experiencing financial challenges, largely related to its labor costs. The paper also disclosed it had not been profitable since printing had resumed in 1993. As a result of these issues, the paper is considering a number of options, including putting the paper up for sale.[34] While deep concern about the paper's future ensued, negotiations proved fruitful and in February, 2007 the paper's unions ratified a new agreement with management mandating job cuts, changes in funding health care benefits and so forth.

In August 2018, the Post-Gazette ceased publishing daily. It began publishing online editions on Tuesdays and Saturdays and print editions the rest of the week.

Shift in editorial stance

In its report of 14 June 2018 on the Post-Gazette's firing of a noted critic of Donald Trump, its long-time editorial cartoonist, Rob Rogers, the Washington Post referred to statements of Rogers and the Newspaper Guild of Pittsburgh that noted that the Post-Gazette's editorial page had shown increasing support for Donald Trump and "pro-conservative orthodoxy".[35] Pittsburgh Mayor, William Peduto, issued a sharp rebuke[36] to the paper over what he termed "the wrong message about press freedoms".[37] The Association of American Editorial Cartoonists stated in its editorial concerning the firing, "It's as simple as this: Rogers was fired for refusing to do cartoons extolling Trump. Let that sink in."[38]

Although that Washington Post report of June stated that the Post-Gazette's publisher and editor-in-chief, John Robinson Block, denied any political motivation behind the June firing of Rogers at that time, the Post reported four months later that the Post-Gazette had hired conservative editorial cartoonist Steve Kelley as Roger's replacement.[39]

Awards

The Post-Gazette won Pulitzers in 1938, 1986, 1987 and 1998. Photographer Morris Berman maintained that the paper would have won a Pulitzer in 1964 but chose not to run his iconic Y. A. Tittle picture that he took at Pitt Stadium.[40] The photo would go on to win awards, hang in the Pro Football Hall of Fame, be used for the back cover of Tittle's autobiography and used in a Miller Beer High-Life commercial in 2005.

Staff photographer Martha Rial won the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for Spot News Photography for her photographs of Rwandan and Burundian refugees.

In 1997 Bill Moushey won the National Press Club’s Freedom of Information Award on a series investigating the Federal Witness Protection Program and was a finalist for the Pulitzer.[41][42]

The Post-Gazette also was instrumental in Pulitzers in 1992.[43]

In addition to the Pulitzers mentioned above, the Post-Gazette also won the Wilbur Award from the Religion Communicators Council (RCC) in 2017 for religion editor Peter Smith's work, Silent Sanctuaries.[44]

In popular culture

The paper was featured on the August 15, 2013, episode of The Colbert Report for its coverage of a Washington County, Pennsylvania, fracking lawsuit.[45]

Prices

Post-Gazette per copy prices are: daily, $2 and Sunday/Thanksgiving Day, $3 in Pennsylvania, including Allegheny/adjacent counties. May be higher outside the state; sales tax is included at newsracks.

See also

References

  1. ^ "United States Circulation averages for the six months ended: 9/30/2011". Audit Bureau of Circulations. September 30, 2011. Archived from the original on March 17, 2013. Retrieved March 19, 2012.
  2. ^ a b Andrews, p. 1.
  3. ^ "The Intellectual Life of Pittsburgh 1786–1836: II.: The Newspapers". Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine. Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania. 14 (1). January 1931. Archived from the original on September 24, 2014.
  4. ^ Andrews, p. 38.
  5. ^ Thomas, p. 42.
  6. ^ Thomas, p. 43.
  7. ^ Andrews, pp. 68, 70, 76, 88.
  8. ^ Andrews, pp. 122, 135; Pittsburgh Gazette (weekly ed.), March 8, 1844, p. 1, col. 1; Pittsburgh Morning Post, March 4, 1844, p. 2, col. 1.
  9. ^ Holt, Michael F. (1999). The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party. Oxford University Press.
  10. ^ "About Us". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Archived from the original on September 8, 2006.
  11. ^ Thomas, p. 101.
  12. ^ Andrews, p. 245.
  13. ^ "About The Daily morning post". Chronicling America. Library of Congress. Archived from the original on May 11, 2014. Retrieved May 10, 2014.
  14. ^ Kehl, James A. (September–December 1948). "The Allegheny Democrat, 1833-1836". The Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine. 31 (3–4): 73–74.
  15. ^ Andrews, p. 73.
  16. ^ Andrews, p. 292.
  17. ^ Andrews, p. 291.
  18. ^ Thomas, pp. 227–228.
  19. ^ Thomas, pp. 229–230.
  20. ^ a b Thomas, p. 231.
  21. ^ a b Thomas, pp. 295–296.
  22. ^ Thomas, pp. 232, 228.
  23. ^ Riely, Kaitlynn (October 25, 2013). "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette building district placed on National Register of Historic Places". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Archived from the original on October 27, 2013.
  24. ^ Thomas, pp. 281–283.
  25. ^ Thomas, p. 303.
  26. ^ Schooley, Tim (November 14, 2011). "Block brings back Pittsburgh Press in e-version". Pittsburgh Business Journal. American City Business Journals. Archived from the original on May 31, 2016.
  27. ^ "Post-Gazette signs lease for printing plant and distribution center in Clinton". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Block Communications. February 12, 2014. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014.
  28. ^ "Post-Gazette newsroom leaves history Downtown with move to North Side". post-gazette.com. Archived from the original on July 8, 2017. Retrieved May 8, 2018.
  29. ^ a b Mervis, Scott (February 8, 2010). "Burgettstown pavilion renamed First Niagara". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Block Communications. Archived from the original on November 29, 2014. Retrieved November 18, 2014.
  30. ^ Olson, Thomas (April 8, 2009). "First Niagara Bank buys 57 National City Bank branches from PNC". TribLive. Archived from the original on November 29, 2014. Retrieved November 18, 2014.
  31. ^ "WIIC-TV Pittsburgh Joins NBC-TV" (PDF). Broadcasting. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications Inc. April 1, 1957. p. 7.
  32. ^ Thomas, pp. 236–237.
  33. ^ "A banner week in station sales" (PDF). Broadcasting. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications Inc. September 7, 1964. p. 54 – via American Radio History.
  34. ^ Boselovic, Len (September 15, 2006). "Without labor deal, PG could be sold, owners say". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Archived from the original on March 10, 2007.
  35. ^ "NEWSPAPER GUILD OF PITTSBURGH STATEMENT ON ROB ROGERS". June 14, 2018.
  36. ^ Statement by Mayor William Peduto on Cartoonist Rob Rogers
  37. ^ Cavna, Michael (June 14, 2018). "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette fires anti-Trump cartoonist, and mayor says it sends 'wrong message about press freedoms'". Washington Post.
  38. ^ "Rob Rogers fired: A statement from the Association of American Cartoonists". June 15, 2018.
  39. ^ Cavna, Michael (October 23, 2018). "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette hires a new conservative cartoonist after the firing of a Trump critic". Washington Post.
  40. ^ Thurber, Jon (June 21, 2002). "Morris Berman, 92; Tittle Photo Endures". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on December 21, 2014. Retrieved November 18, 2014.
  41. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-10-01. Retrieved May 21, 2013.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  42. ^ "Bill Moushey: Professor of Journalism". Point Park University. Archived from the original on 2014-11-16. Retrieved November 18, 2014.
  43. ^ Jones, Diana Nelson (April 8, 1992). "Picture perfect: Photographer wins Pulitzer for series on 21-year-olds". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Block Communications. p. 12 – via Google News.
  44. ^ "Wilbur Awards" (PDF). 2017. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  45. ^ "The Word — Gag Gift". Colbert Nation. Archived from the original on February 26, 2014. Retrieved November 18, 2014.

Bibliography and further reading

External links

1978 Pittsburgh Steelers season

The 1978 Pittsburgh Steelers season was the franchise's 46th season in the National Football League (NFL). The season concluded with the team winning Super Bowl XIII to become the first franchise in the NFL to win three Super Bowl titles. The championship run was led by quarterback Terry Bradshaw and the team's vaunted Steel Curtain defense. Bradshaw put together the best year of his career to that point, becoming only the second Steeler to win the NFL MVP award. Ten Steelers players were named to the Pro Bowl team, and four were judged as first-team All-Pros by the AP. Head coach Chuck Noll returned for his tenth season—moving him ahead of Walt Kiesling as the longest tenured head coach in the team's history to that point.The Steelers entered the season as defending champions of the AFC Central Division, coming off a 9–5 record in 1977. Despite winning their division, the previous season was a difficult one for the team (both on and off the field) which culminated in a division round playoff loss to the Denver Broncos on Christmas Eve.

The team began the 1978 season with seven straight victories, before losing to the Houston Oilers in prime time on Monday Night Football. They finished the season with a league-best 14–2 record, including a 5-game winning streak to close the season. This record assured them they would play at home throughout the 1978 playoffs. It was also the best record compiled in the team's history (since surpassed only by a 15–1 mark in 2004).The 1978 Steelers team was rated the thirty-fifth best team in the history of the NFL (to September 2015) by FiveThirtyEight, a polling aggregation and statistical service. The rating is based upon FiveThirtyEight's proprietary Elo rating system algorithm. Only two Steelers teams were rated higher: the 1975 team at twelfth and the 2005 team one slot ahead of the 1978 team at thirty-fourth.

Allegheny College

Allegheny College is a private, coeducational liberal arts college in northwestern Pennsylvania in the town of Meadville, approximately 35 miles (56 km) south of Erie. Founded in 1815, Allegheny is the oldest college in continuous existence under the same name west of the Allegheny Mountains. Allegheny is a member of the Great Lakes Colleges Association and the North Coast Athletic Conference and it is regionally accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education.

Block Communications

Block Communications (also known as Blade Communications) is an American privately held holding company of various assets, mainly in the print and broadcast media, based in Toledo, Ohio. The company was founded in 1900 in New York City when Paul Block, a German-Jewish immigrant who came to the United States fifteen years prior, formed an ad representation firm for newspaper the Block empire grew to encompass many newspapers on the east coast of the US, however with the Great Depression in the 1930s came the loss of all but three properties: the ad representation firm, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, and the Toledo Blade (where Block eventually settled the company upon its purchase in 1927). After Block's death in 1941, over the company and later his grandchildren (one of whom, Allan Block, is company chairman).

Charley Feeney

Charles V. "Charley" Feeney (November 26, 1924 - March 17, 2014) was an American sportswriter in New York, New York, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, for more than 40 years.

Dapper Dan Charities

The Dapper Dan Charities were founded by Pittsburgh Post-Gazette editor Al Abrams in 1936. It is one of the oldest non-profit and fundraising community sports club in the world, and the oldest in Western Pennsylvania. The foundations fundraises for its charities primarily through the annual "Dapper Dan Banquet". Started in 1936 the first few banquets honored such regional figures as Art Rooney, Jock Sutherland and John Harris. In 1939 the banquet began an annual tradition of naming the region's "Sportsman of the Year" and in 1999 the "Sportswoman of the Year". In recent decades all charitable contributions raised by the banquet go to the Boys and Girls club of Western Pennsylvania, which directly funds activities and equipment for nearly 7,000 youths annually. The organization also presently sponsors the annual Dapper Dan Wrestling Classic.Previous fundraisers included the occasional Dapper Dan Open golf tournament in the 1930s and 1940s, World Heavyweight Titles hosted at Forbes Field in the 1950s and 1960s and the Roundball Classic hosted at the Civic Arena from 1965 until the 1980s.

Through Pittsburgh Pirates broadcaster Bob Prince's friendship with Fred Hutchinson the Dapper Dan Charity awarded Major League Baseball's annual Hutch Award at the annual banquet until at least 1993.

David L. Lawrence Convention Center

The David L. Lawrence Convention Center (DLLCC) is a 1,500,000-square-foot (140,000 m2) convention, conference and exhibition building in downtown Pittsburgh in the U.S. commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It is served by two exits on Interstate 579. The initial David L. Lawrence Convention Center was completed on the site on February 7, 1981, but as part of a renewal plan the new, completely redesigned center was opened in 2003 and funded in conjunction with nearby Heinz Field and PNC Park. It sits on the southern shoreline of the Allegheny River. It is the first LEED-certified convention center in North America and one of the first in the world. It is owned by the Sports & Exhibition Authority of Pittsburgh and Allegheny County.

Heinz Field

Heinz Field is a stadium located in the North Shore neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. It primarily serves as the home to the Pittsburgh Steelers of the National Football League (NFL) and the Pittsburgh Panthers of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The stadium opened in 2001, after the controlled implosion of the teams' previous stadium, Three Rivers Stadium. The stadium is named for the locally based H. J. Heinz Company, which purchased the naming rights in 2001. It hosted the 2011 NHL Winter Classic between the Pittsburgh Penguins and Washington Capitals on January 1, 2011. On September 10, 2016, it hosted the Keystone Classic, which featured a renewal of the Penn State-Pitt football rivalry, setting a new attendance record at 69,983 people. In 2017 it hosted the Coors Light Stadium Series game featuring the Pittsburgh Penguins and Philadelphia Flyers.

Funded in conjunction with PNC Park and the David L. Lawrence Convention Center, the $281 million (equivalent to $397.60 million in 2018) stadium stands along the Ohio River, on the Northside of Pittsburgh in the North Shore neighborhood. The stadium was designed with the city of Pittsburgh's history of steel production in mind, which led to the inclusion of 12,000 tons of steel into construction. Ground for the stadium was broken in June 1999 and the first football game was hosted in September 2001. The stadium's natural grass surface has been criticized throughout its history, but Steelers ownership has kept the grass after lobbying from players and coaches. Attendance for the 68,400 seat stadium has sold out for every Steelers home game, a streak which dates back to 1972 (a year before local telecasts of sold out home games were permitted in the NFL). A collection of memorabilia from the Steelers and Panthers of the past can be found in the Great Hall.

List of films shot in Pittsburgh

This list includes films shot either completely or partially in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and/or the Pittsburgh metropolitan area. Some of these are set in the city; others were shot in Pittsburgh but set in another real or fictional location

Mark Madden

Mark Madden (born December 29, 1960) is an American talk-show host from and based in Pittsburgh. He is best known for his work as color commentator for World Championship Wrestling. Madden currently hosts a weekday afternoon show from 3-6 PM on local radio station, 105.9 The X, and serves as a part-time sports columnist for TribLive.

Media in Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh is home to the first commercial radio station in the United States, KDKA 1020AM; the first community-sponsored television station in the United States, WQED 13; the first "networked" television station and the first station in the country to broadcast 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, KDKA 2; and the first newspaper published west of the Allegheny Mountains, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Until 2016 Pittsburgh was one of the few mid-sized metropolitan areas in the U.S. with two major daily papers; both the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review have histories of breaking in-depth investigative news stories on a national scale. In 2016, the Tribune-Review moved to an all-digital format. In 2018, the Post-Gazette moved to publishing five print editions a week. The alternative papers in the region include the Pittsburgh City Paper; The Jewish Chronicle of Pittsburgh; The New People, published weekly by the Thomas Merton Center for Peace and Social Justice; the New Pittsburgh Courier, one of the larger ethnic publications in the region; and Zajedničar, the only Croatian-language newspaper currently published in the United States. The Pitt News, a financially independent student-written and -managed newspaper of the University of Pittsburgh, is closing in on its 100th year of publication. The University of Pittsburgh School of Law also hosts JURIST, the world's only university-based legal news service.

Outdoor advertising in the area is handled by Lamar Outdoor, who controls a majority of large posters and billboards and bus shelters (including Downtown Pittsburgh) and shopping centers in the area.

Myron Cope

Myron Sidney Kopelman (January 23, 1929 – February 27, 2008), known professionally as Myron Cope, was an American sports journalist, radio personality, and sportscaster. He is best known for being "the voice of the Pittsburgh Steelers".

Cope was a color commentator for the Steelers' radio broadcasts for 35 years. He was known for his distinctive, nasally voice with an identifiable Pittsburgh accent, idiosyncratic speech pattern, and a level of excitement rarely exhibited in the broadcast booth. Cope's most notable catch phrase was "yoi" . Cope was the first football announcer inducted into the National Radio Hall of Fame. Cope's autobiography, Double Yoi!, was published in 2002.

PNC Park

PNC Park is a baseball park located on the North Shore of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It is the fifth home of the Pittsburgh Pirates, the city's Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise. It opened during the 2001 MLB season, after the controlled implosion of the Pirates' previous home, Three Rivers Stadium. The ballpark is sponsored by PNC Financial Services, which purchased the naming rights in 1998. PNC Park features a natural grass playing surface and seats 38,747 people for baseball.

Funded in conjunction with Heinz Field and the David L. Lawrence Convention Center, the $216 million park stands along the Allegheny River, on the North Shore of Pittsburgh with a view of Downtown Pittsburgh. Plans to build a new stadium for the Pirates originated in 1991, but did not come to fruition for 5 years. Built in the style of "classic" stadiums, such as Pittsburgh's Forbes Field, PNC Park also introduced unique features, such as the use of limestone in the building's facade. The park also features a riverside concourse, steel truss work, an extensive out-of-town scoreboard, and many local eateries. Constructed faster than most modern stadiums, PNC Park was built in a 24-month span.

PPG Paints Arena

PPG Paints Arena is a multi-purpose indoor arena in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania that serves as home to the Pittsburgh Penguins of the National Hockey League (NHL), and was the home of the Pittsburgh Power of the Arena Football League (AFL) from 2011 to 2014.

Construction was completed on August 1, 2010, and the arena opened in time for the 2010–11 NHL season. It replaced the Penguins' former arena, Civic Arena (formerly known as Mellon Arena), which was completed in 1961. A ceremonial ground-breaking was held on August 14, 2008. The arena is the first Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) gold-certified arena in both the NHL and AFL. Soon after the arena opened in 2010 it was named "Best New Major Concert Venue" in the Pollstar Concert Industry Awards and "Best NHL Arena" in the Sports Business Journal reader poll. The arena was originally named Consol Energy Center (CEC) after Consol Energy purchased the naming rights in December 2008. The current name comes from Pittsburgh-based PPG Industries, who purchased naming rights in October 2016.

Pennsylvania Report

The Pennsylvania Report is an independent bi-weekly subscription-based political newspaper published in Pennsylvania. It is "widely read by the state's political junkies." It was founded in 1985 by David Buffington, a former public relations worker for the Pennsylvania Government.It provides confidential reports on "personalities, events and trends" within the politics of Pennsylvania. Annual features include "The PA Report 100," profiling 100 individuals the editors think are "most likely to have an impact on government and politics" in Pennsylvania that year, and "The Political Stock Exchange," ranking the relative value of political personalities to their cause. The annual "Legislative All Star Team" provides a tongue-in-cheek baseball team composed of legislators.Features and exclusive interviews in the Pennsylvania Report frequently appear in other publications, including the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and the Philadelphia City Paper.Former editor David Buffington is frequently quoted regarding issues of Pennsylvania politics.The results of a Pennsylvania Report poll regarding the 1994 Pennsylvania gubernatorial election was reported in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. In an article about freshman legislator Shawn Flaherty, the Pittsburgh City Paper noted that he had been dubbed "Rookie of the Year" by the Pennsylvania Report.

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh ( PITS-burg) is a city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in the United States, and is the county seat of Allegheny County. As of 2017, a population of 305,704 lives within the city limits, making it the 63rd-largest city in the U.S. The metropolitan population of 2,353,045 is the largest in both the Ohio Valley and Appalachia, the second-largest in Pennsylvania (behind Philadelphia), and the 26th-largest in the U.S.

Pittsburgh is located in the south west of the state, at the confluence of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio rivers, Pittsburgh is known both as "the Steel City" for its more than 300 steel-related businesses and as the "City of Bridges" for its 446 bridges. The city features 30 skyscrapers, two inclined railways, a pre-revolutionary fortification and the Point State Park at the confluence of the rivers. The city developed as a vital link of the Atlantic coast and Midwest, as the mineral-rich Allegheny Mountains made the area coveted by the French and British empires, Virginians, Whiskey Rebels, and Civil War raiders.Aside from steel, Pittsburgh has led in manufacturing of aluminum, glass, shipbuilding, petroleum, foods, sports, transportation, computing, autos, and electronics. For part of the 20th century, Pittsburgh was behind only New York and Chicago in corporate headquarters employment; it had the most U.S. stockholders per capita. America's 1980s deindustrialization laid off area blue-collar workers and thousands of downtown white-collar workers when the longtime Pittsburgh-based world headquarters moved out. This heritage left the area with renowned museums, medical centers, parks, research centers, and a diverse cultural district.Today, Google, Apple Inc., Bosch, Facebook, Uber, Nokia, Autodesk, Microsoft and IBM are among 1,600 technology firms generating $20.7 billion in annual Pittsburgh payrolls. The area has served as the long-time federal agency headquarters for cyber defense, software engineering, robotics, energy research and the nuclear navy. The area is home to 68 colleges and universities, including research and development leaders Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh. The nation's eighth-largest bank, eight Fortune 500 companies, and six of the top 300 U.S. law firms make their global headquarters in the area, while RAND, BNY Mellon, Nova, FedEx, Bayer and NIOSH have regional bases that helped Pittsburgh become the sixth-best area for U.S. job growth.In 2015, Pittsburgh was listed among the "eleven most livable cities in the world"; The Economist's Global Liveability Ranking placed Pittsburgh as the first- or second-most livable city in the United States in 2005, 2009, 2011, 2012 and 2014. The region is a hub for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design and energy extraction.In 2019, Pittsburgh was deemed “Food City of the Year” by the San Francisco-based restaurant and hospitality consulting firm af&co. Many restaurants were mentioned favorable, among them were Superior Motors in Braddock, Driftwood Oven in Lawrenceville, Spork in Bloomfield, Fish nor Fowl in Garfield and Bitter Ends Garden & Luncheonette in Bloomfield.

Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, also known as "the Trib," is the second largest daily newspaper serving metropolitan Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in the United States. Although it transitioned to an all-digital format on December 1, 2016, it remains the second largest daily in the state, amassing nearly one million unique page views a month. Founded on August 22, 1811, as the Greensburg Gazette and in 1889 consolidated with several papers into the Greensburg Tribune-Review, the paper circulated only in the eastern suburban counties of Westmoreland and parts of Indiana and Fayette until May 1992, when it began serving all of the Pittsburgh metropolitan area after a strike at the two Pittsburgh dailies, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Pittsburgh Press, deprived the city of a newspaper for several months.

The Tribune-Review Publishing Company was owned by Richard Mellon Scaife, an heir to the Mellon banking, oil, and aluminum fortune, until his death in July 2014. Scaife was a major funder of conservative organizations, including the Arkansas Project. Accordingly, the Tribune-Review has maintained a conservative editorial stance, contrasting with the more centrist Post-Gazette. In addition to its flagship paper, the company publishes 17 weekly community newspapers, the Pittsburgh Pennysaver, as well as TribLive.com and TribTotalMedia.com.

Roy Face

Elroy Leon Face (born February 20, 1928) is an American former professional baseball relief pitcher. During a 17-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career, he pitched primarily for the Pittsburgh Pirates. A pioneer of modern relief pitching, he was the archetype of what came to be known as the closer, and the National League's greatest reliever until the late 1960s, setting numerous league records during his career.

Face was the first major leaguer to save 20 games more than once, leading the league three times and finishing second three times; in 1959 he set the still-standing major league record for winning percentage (.947), and single-season wins in relief, with 18 wins against only one loss. He held the NL record for career games pitched (846) from 1967 until 1986, and the league record for career saves (193) from 1962 until 1982; he still holds the NL record for career wins in relief (96), and he held the league mark for career innings pitched in relief (1,211​1⁄3) until 1983. On his retirement, he ranked third in major league history in pitching appearances, behind only Hoyt Wilhelm and Cy Young, and second in saves behind Wilhelm. Nicknamed "The Baron", he holds the Pirates franchise records for career games (802) and saves (188).

Taylor Allderdice High School

Taylor Allderdice High School is a public high school located in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It is part of the Pittsburgh Public Schools district.

The school opened in 1927 and was named for industrialist and Squirrel Hill resident Taylor Allderdice, who was a member of the city's first school board and president of National Tube Company, a subsidiary of U.S. Steel Corporation.

YinzCam

YinzCam is an American software company that builds mobile applications, IPTV platforms and augmented-reality experiences. It specializes in creating applications for professional sports organizations. As of 2018, YinzCam's software had been downloaded over 55 million times and used by 170+ sports properties, including NFL clubs, NBA/WNBA teams, AFL clubs (Australia), La Liga clubs (Spain), as well as in the La Liga official league app and the NBA's G-League app and the NBA2k app. The applications generally offer real-time statistics, multimedia, streaming radio, social media. The live video technology offering instant replay, including NFL RedZone, is offered within NFL stadiums.YinzCam was founded by Priya Narasimhan, a Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. She is a fan of the Pittsburgh Penguins and the Pittsburgh Steelers. The company is a spin-off from the university. Narasimhan has incorporated YinzCam into her Sports Technology course at Carnegie Mellon University.

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