Pittsburgh City Council

The Pittsburgh City Council serves as the legislative body in the City of Pittsburgh. It consists of nine members.[2] City council members are chosen by plurality elections in each of nine districts. The city operates under a strong-mayor-council system of local governance.

City Council of the City of Pittsburgh
Seal of the City of Pittsburgh
Type
Type
Full-time Mayor-Council
HousesUnicameral
History
Preceded byBorough of Pittsburgh House of Burgesses City of Pittsburgh Select Council and City of Pittsburgh Common Council[1]
Leadership
Council President
Bruce Kraus, Democratic
since 2014
City Clerk
Brenda F. Pree, CMC
Structure
Seats9
Partisan makeup of the Pittsburgh City Council as of June 2018
Political groups
Democratic
CommitteesFinance and Law; Public Safety; Public Works; Human Resources; Land Use and Economic Development; Urban Recreation; Innovation, Performance, and Asset Management; Intergovernmental Affairs, Hearings
Length of term
4 Years
Elections
Plurality by District
RedistrictingDecennial
Motto
Benigno Numine (by the favor of the heavens)
Meeting place
Council Chamber
City-County Building
Website
pittsburghpa.gov/council/council.html
Constitution
Home Rule Charter

Code of Ordinances

Rules of Council
Pittsburgh Code of Ordinances title page
Title page of the Pittsburgh Code of Ordinances

Current membership

The current members of the city council are:[3]

District Name Took Office Committee Chairship Party
1 Darlene Harris 2006 Human Resources Democratic
2 Theresa Kail-Smith 2009[4] Public Works Democratic
3 Bruce Kraus† 2008 Hearings Democratic
4 Anthony Coghill 2018 Urban Recreation Democratic
5 Corey O'Connor 2012 Intergovernmental Affairs Democratic
6 R. Daniel Lavelle 2010 Public Safety Democratic
7 Deborah Gross 2014 Land Use and Economic Development Democratic
8 Erika Strassburger 2018 Innovation, Performance, and Asset Management Democratic
9 Rev. Ricky Burgess 2008 Finance and Law Democratic

† Denotes Council President (since 2014[5])

Past presidents

Past members[9]

  • Natalia Rudiak (2009–2018)
  • Patrick Dowd (2008–2013)
  • Bill Peduto (2002–14)
  • Barbara Burns (2000–04)
  • Sala Udin (1997–2007)
  • Dan Onorato (1992–2000)
  • Bob O'Connor (1991–2003)
  • Gene Ricciardi (1990-?)
  • Christopher Smith (?-1997)
  • Michael Coyne (1988–92)
  • Bernard Regan (?-1992)
  • Jack Wagner (1984–94)
  • Alan Hertzberg 2003?[10]
  • Jim Ferlo (1988-2002)
  • Otis Lyons, Jr. (1988–89)
  • Mark Pollock (1986–89)
  • Stephen Grabowski (1984–88)
  • Ben Woods (1981–89)
  • Thomas E. Flaherty (1980–83)
  • Jim O'Malley (1980–87)
  • Michelle Madoff (1978–94)
  • William Robinson (1978–85)
  • Jim Bulls (1977–80)
  • Sophie Masloff (1976–88)
  • Richard E. Givens (1976–87)
  • James Lally (1976–80)
  • Frank Lucchino (1974–78)
  • John Lynch (1970–76)
  • William J. Coyne (1974–81)
  • Robert Rade Stone (1973–85)
  • Eugene DePasquale (1972–84, 1988–89)
  • Richard Caligiuri (1970–77)
  • Charles Leslie (1970–72)
  • Amy Ballinger (1970–76) Chairman of the cities committee to grant cable TV[11][12]
  • James Cortese (1970)
  • George Shields (1970–74)
  • John Lynch (1970–76)
  • Edgar Michaels (1969–74)
  • Thomas Fagan (1968–73)
  • Louis Mason Jr. (1967–77)
  • Peter Flaherty (1966–70)
  • Walter Kamyk (1963–70)
  • Charles Leslie (1961–69)
  • Phillip Baskin (1962–70)
  • James Jordan (1960–67)
  • Horner Green (1960–61)
  • George Shields (1970–74)
  • Edgar Michaels (1969–74)
  • J. Craig Kuhn (1959–70)
  • Charles McCarthy (1958–63)
  • David Olbum (1956–61)
  • Irma D'Ascenzo (1956–70)
  • Paul Jones (1954–60)
  • Emanuel Schifano (1952–56)
  • Bennett Rodgers (1952–59)
  • Charles Dinan (1952–58)
  • John Counahan (1952–70)
  • William Davis (1951–53)
  • Patrick Fagan (1950–67)
  • Frederick Weir (1947–60)
  • William Alvah Stewart (1946–51)
  • Joseph A. McArdle (1942–49)
  • Thomas Kilgallen (1940–51)
  • John Duff Jr. (1940–52)
  • Edward Leonard (1939–51)
  • A.L. Wolk (1938–56)
  • James A. O'Toole (1936–41)
  • Frederick Weir (1936–47)
  • Cornelius Scully (1935–36)
  • George Evans (1935–45)
  • William Magee (1934–37)
  • John Jane (1934–35)
  • John Houston (1934–35)
  • Thomas Gallagher (1934–65)
  • Walter Demmer (1934–51)
  • Frank Duggan (1933-33)
  • George Oliver (1933-33)
  • William Soost (1932–35)
  • John Phillips (1931–32)
  • Michael Muldowney (1930–33)
  • Clifford Connelley (1930–33)
  • George J. Kambach (1929–31)
  • Harry A. Little (1926–33)
  • Robert J. Alderdice (1924–32)
  • Joseph F. Malone (1922–30)
  • Wallace Borland (1922–25)
  • Charles Anderson (1920–39)
  • A.K. Oliver (1919–21)
  • John H. Henderson (1919–21)
  • Daniel Winters (1918–29)
  • William J. Burke (1918–19)
  • William H. Robertson (1916–24)
  • John H. Dailey (1916–21)
  • P.J. McArdle (1911–13, 1916–19, 1922–30, 1932-40)
  • Charles H. Hetzel (1914–15)
  • W.Y. English (1914–33)
  • John S. Herron (1914–33)
  • Dr. G.A. Dillinger (1913–17)
  • Robert Garland (1911–39)
  • Dr. S.S. Wooburn (1911–39)
  • W.G. Wilkins (1911–13)
  • Enoch Rauh (1911–19)
  • James P. Kerr (1911–18)
  • John M. Goehring (1911–15)
  • W.A. Hoeveler (1911–14)
  • Edward V. Babcock (1911–13)
  • David P. Black (1911)
  • A.J. Kelly (1911)
  • Robert McKnight (1847–49)

See also

References

  1. ^ "Around Town: In the good ol' days, Pittsburgh Council had 108 guys". Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh Post Gazette. Retrieved 27 June 2018.
  2. ^ "City Council Function". www.city.pittsburgh.pa.us.
  3. ^ "City Council Archived 1998-12-06 at the Wayback Machine." City of Pittsburgh (official website) Archived 2007-02-02 at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved on January 4, 2010.
  4. ^ Lord, Rich (February 19, 2009). "New Pittsburgh councilwoman sworn in". The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved March 8, 2012.
  5. ^ Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. 2014-01-06 http://www.post-gazette.com/local/city/2014/01/06/Kraus-likely-to-replace-Harris-as-Pittsburgh-council-president/stories/201401060104. Retrieved 2014-01-06. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  6. ^ "The Pittsburgh Press - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com.
  7. ^ "The Pittsburgh Press - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com.
  8. ^ "The Pittsburgh Press - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com.
  9. ^ "Brookline and Pittsburgh Historical Facts and Remembrances". www.brooklineconnection.com.
  10. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com.
  11. ^ "The Pittsburgh Press - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com.
  12. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com.

External links

Bill Peduto

William Mark Peduto (born October 30, 1964) is an American politician who serves as the 60th Mayor of Pittsburgh. A member of the Democratic Party, he previously served as a member of the Pittsburgh City Council from 2002 until 2014.Prior to being elected to City Council, Peduto attended Pennsylvania State University, from which he took a leave of absence before later completing his degree. He ran a consulting business and later served as Chief of Staff to his predecessor in City Council, Dan Cohen. Peduto was elected to City Council in 2001 and served from 2002 until 2014. During that time, he ran for Mayor of Pittsburgh three times. In 2005, he ran in the Democratic primary but was defeated by Bob O'Connor, who went on to become mayor in 2006. Peduto again ran in a 2007 special election following O'Connor's death; however, he dropped out before the primary. He ran for mayor for a third time in 2013, this time winning the Democratic nomination and emerging victorious.

In the 2013 election, Peduto defeated opponents Joshua Wander and Lester Ludwig, winning 84% of the vote. After being elected Mayor to succeed the outgoing Luke Ravenstahl, Peduto was inaugurated in January 2014. In the 2017 election, he was re-elected to a second term as Mayor, winning 96% of the vote.

Bob O'Connor (mayor)

Robert E. O'Connor Jr. (December 9, 1944 – September 1, 2006) was an American politician who was the Mayor of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania from January 3, 2006, until his death.

Carrick (Pittsburgh)

Carrick is a south neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the United States. It is served by two zip codes, 15210 and 15227, and has representation on Pittsburgh City Council by the council member for District 4 (South Neighborhoods) with a part in District 3.

Located between the suburbs of the South Hills and downtown, Carrick is well-served by public transportation. Once home to prominent mansions and wealthy families, the neighborhood currently has an affordable, solid housing stock and remains family-oriented.

Chartiers (Pittsburgh)

Chartiers (sometimes called Chartiers City) is a neighborhood in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania's west area. It has a zip code of 15204, and has representation on Pittsburgh City Council by the council member for District 2 (West Neighborhoods). The neighborhood was named after Peter Chartier, a trapper of French and Native American parentage who established a trading post at the mouth of Chartiers Creek in 1743.

Dan Onorato

Daniel Onorato (born February 5, 1961) is an American Democratic politician from the state of Pennsylvania. He served as the Chief Executive of Allegheny County from 2004 to 2012, and in 2010, he was the Democratic nominee for Governor. He lost to State Attorney General Tom Corbett in the general election.

Duquesne Heights (Pittsburgh)

Duquesne Heights ( dew-KAYN) is a neighborhood in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania's south city area. It has a zip code of 15211, and has representation on Pittsburgh City Council by the council member for District 2 (West and Southwest Neighborhoods).

East Hills (Pittsburgh)

East Hills is a neighborhood in the east side of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. Its ZIP Code is 15221. It has representation on Pittsburgh City Council by the council member for District 9 (north north-east neighborhoods).

Jack Wagner (politician)

Jack E. Wagner (born January 4, 1948) is a Democratic politician from Pennsylvania. He is a former State Auditor General, and has also served in the State Senate and Pittsburgh City Council.

Joseph A. McArdle

Joseph A. McArdle (June 29, 1903 – December 27, 1967) was a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania.

Joseph A. McArdle was born in Muncie, Indiana. In 1905, he moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, with his parents. He served in the Pennsylvania State House of Representatives from 1936 to 1938.

McArdle was elected as a Democrat to the Seventy-sixth and Seventy-seventh Congresses and served until his resignation on January 5, 1942, to become a member of the Pittsburgh City Council.

He served as a Pittsburgh City Councilman until 1949. Also in 1949, he switched parties to turn Republican, and became the State GOP committeeman from Mount Washington, Pennsylvania, from early 1950 until 1966.

List of City of Pittsburgh historic designations

Historic designations in the City of Pittsburgh are awarded following nominations for districts and individual structures that are reviewed and recommended to Pittsburgh City Council, which makes the final decision, by the city's Historic Review Commission and the City Planning Commission. This list is not to be confused with the list of landmarks designated by the Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation. City Historic Designation establishes a regulatory process for the review of all changes and alterations by the Historic Review Commission to the publicly viewable exterior and appearance of all buildings that are designated, either individually or as part of a district. As of 2011, there were 12 designated districts in the city, two historic objects, one historic site, and 87 individual structures.

Mount Oliver (Pittsburgh)

Mount Oliver is a south neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It has a zip code of 15210, and has representation on Pittsburgh City Council by the council member for District 3 (Central South Neighborhoods). It is adjacent to, but distinct from, the borough of Mount Oliver.

New Homestead (Pittsburgh)

New Homestead is a neighborhood in the 31st Ward of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA's southeast city area. It has a ZIP Code of 15207 and 15120, and it is represented on Pittsburgh City Council by Corey O'Connor.

North Shore (Pittsburgh)

The North Shore is a neighborhood in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania's North Side. It has a zip code of 15212, and has representation on Pittsburgh City Council by both the council members for District 1 (North Neighborhoods) and 6 (North Shore/Downtown Neighborhoods). The neighborhood is home to Heinz Field, PNC Park and The Andy Warhol Museum.

It is developing rapidly around and between the two stadiums. Two new light rail stations opened in the spring of 2012. The North Side station is located beside PNC Park and near the north portal of the Allegheny River Tunnel. Allegheny station is located by Heinz Field, and is the current western terminus of the line.

Oakwood (Pittsburgh)

Oakwood is a neighborhood in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania's southwest city area. It has a zip code of 15205, and has representation on Pittsburgh City Council by the council member for District 2 (West Neighborhoods).

Perry North (Pittsburgh)

Perry North (also known as Observatory Hill) is a neighborhood in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA's north city area. It lies within zip codes 15212 and 15214, and has representation on Pittsburgh City Council by the council member for District 1 (North Neighborhoods). The highest elevation in Pittsburgh is 1,370 feet at the Brashear Reservoir at the top of Observatory Hill. The Pittsburgh Bureau of fire houses 34 Engine in Perry North.

Observatory Hill was originally part of Allegheny City. Since Allegheny City's annexation to the city of Pittsburgh in 1907, the Observatory Hill district has expanded and is home to nearly 14,000 residents. The neighborhood has stately homes, a business district, Riverview Park, and the Allegheny Observatory.

Richard Caliguiri

Richard S. Caliguiri (October 20, 1931 – May 6, 1988) was an American politician who served as the mayor of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania from 1977 until his death in 1988.

Ridgemont (Pittsburgh)

Ridgemont is a neighborhood in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania's southwest city area. It has zip codes of both 15220 and 15216, and has representation on Pittsburgh City Council by the council member for District 2 (West Neighborhoods).

Sophie Masloff

Sophie Masloff (née Friedman; December 23, 1917 – August 17, 2014) was an American politician. A long-time member of the Democratic Party and civil servant, she was elected to the Pittsburgh City Council and later served as the mayor of Pittsburgh from 1988 to 1994. She was the first woman and the first Jew to hold that office.

Windgap (Pittsburgh)

Windgap is a neighborhood in the west area of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. It has a zip code of 15204, and has representation on Pittsburgh City Council by the council member for District 2 (West Neighborhoods).

It borders the City of Pittsburgh neighborhoods of Sheraden, Chartiers City, and Fairywood, and the suburbs McKees Rocks and Ingram.

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