Philippine Area of Responsibility

The Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) is an area in the Northwestern Pacific where PAGASA, the Philippines' national meteorological agency monitors weather occurrences. Significant weather disturbances, specifically, tropical depressions and tropical cyclones, that enter or develop in the PAR are given Philippine-specific names.

Boundary

PAGASA Philippine Area of Responsibility - en
Philippine Area of Responsibility

The area is bounded by six points namely:[1]

This area encompasses almost all of the land territory of the Philippines, except for the southernmost portions of the province of Tawi-Tawi, and some of the country's claimed islands in the Spratlys. The area also includes the main island of Palau, most of Taiwan, as well as portions of the Malaysian state of Sabah and the Japanese prefecture of Okinawa.

Function

The establishing decree of PAGASA mandates the weather agency, particularly its National Weather Office, to monitor weather occurrences occurring within the PAR. This area is defined by the World Meteorological Organization.[2][3]

Tropical depressions and tropical cyclones (typhoons) are only assigned local names by PAGASA when they enter or develop within the PAR.[4][5] These names are provided in parallel with internationally recognized names designated by the Japan Meteorological Agency. The rationale for providing local names is that it is felt that Filipinos will respond more to familiar names and that it helps to underscore that these named weather disturbances pose a direct threat to the country. Furthermore, PAGASA provide names when a low pressure area becomes a tropical depression, in contrast to international names that are only provided for tropical cyclones, due to the fact that tropical depressions can still cause flooding and other damage.[6]

When a named weather disturbance within the PAR has made or is expected to make a landfall in the Philippines, PAGASA is mandated to issue weather bulletins every six hours. If the weather disturbance is not affecting land, the weather agency has to issue bulletins every 12 hours.[7]

References

  1. ^ "Memorandum Circular No. 02-2013 - Guidelines on Movement of Vessels During Heavy Weather". Philippine Coast Guard. 5 June 2013. Retrieved 30 November 2017.
  2. ^ "Presidential Decree No. 78 -Establishing the Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration". The LawPhil Project. 8 December 1972. Retrieved 30 November 2017.
  3. ^ "Tropical cyclones, rainfall advisories". Rappler. 22 September 2017. Retrieved 30 November 2017.
  4. ^ "Philippine Tropical cyclone names". Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration. Archived from the original on December 28, 2016. Retrieved January 17, 2017.
  5. ^ Rosero, Earl Victor (27 September 2011). "Why and how storms get their names". GMA News. Retrieved 30 November 2017.
  6. ^ "What are the upcoming tropical cyclone names ?". Hurricane Research Division, Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 30 November 2017.
  7. ^ Carillo, Jose (18 July 2014). "Getting acclimatized to PHL's weather terminology". Manila Bulletin. Retrieved 30 November 2017.
1945 Pacific typhoon season

The 1945 Pacific typhoon season was the first official season to be included in the West Pacific typhoon database. It has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1945, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1945 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names.

1946 Pacific typhoon season

The 1946 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1946, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1946 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names.

1947 Pacific typhoon season

The 1947 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1947, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1947 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names.

1969 Pacific typhoon season

The 1969 Pacific typhoon season was the fourth least-active season on record. The season had no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1969, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1969 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names.

1973 Pacific typhoon season

The 1973 Pacific typhoon season was the latest start to the typhoon season on record. It had no official bounds, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1973 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names.

1974 Pacific typhoon season

The 1974 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1974, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1974 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names.

1975 Pacific typhoon season

The 1975 Pacific typhoon season was one of the deadliest tropical cyclone seasons on record, with nearly 230,000 fatalities occurring during the season. It had no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1975, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names.

Some of the notable storms here are Typhoon Nina, which caused the Banqiao Dam flood, which resulted in approximately 229,000 people dead, and Super Typhoon June, which was the strongest storm on record with a pressure of 875 mbar, until beaten by Typhoon Tip in 1979 with 870 mbar.

1980 Pacific typhoon season

The 1980 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1980, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Tropical storms which formed in the entire west Pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names.

A total of 28 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 24 became tropical storms. Beginning in March, tropical cyclones formed in each subsequent month through December. Of the 28, 15 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 2 reached super typhoon strength. Seven tropical cyclones moved through the Philippines this season.

2005 Pacific typhoon season

The 2005 Pacific typhoon season was the least active typhoon season since 2000, featuring only 24 tropical storms, 13 typhoons and three super typhoons. The season ran throughout 2005, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Kulap, developed on January 15, while the season's last named storm, Bolaven, dissipated on November 20.

Although the season was quiet, some typhoons caused extensive damages in many places, especially in China where eight typhoons struck the country. First, Typhoon Haitang became the strongest storm in the basin this year and caused about $1 billion in damages in Taiwan and China in mid July. In August, Typhoon Matsa made landfall in Eastern China and caused about $2.2 billion in damages. Later that same month, two powerful typhoons made landfall, causing extreme damage and some casualties. Similar to Haitang, Typhoon Longwang made landfall in Taiwan and China at a strong intensity causing damages. The season also marked the first time the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season was more active than the Pacific typhoon season (the other being 2010). However, the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season featured record high activity while the Pacific typhoon season featured near average activity.

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean north of the equator between 100°E and 180th meridian. Within the northwestern Pacific Ocean, there are two separate agencies that assign names to tropical cyclones which can often result in a cyclone having two names. The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) will name a tropical cyclone should it be judged to have 10-minute sustained wind speeds of at least 65 km/h (40 mph) anywhere in the basin, whilst the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones which move into or form as a tropical depression in their area of responsibility located between 135°E and 115°E and between 5°N–25°N regardless of whether or not a tropical cyclone has already been given a name by the JMA. Tropical depressions that are monitored by the United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) are given a number with a "W" suffix.

Alangalang, Leyte

Alangalang, officially the Municipality of Alangalang, is a 2nd class municipality in the province of Leyte, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 55,235 people.It is a landlocked town with an area of 151 km². It is bounded on the north by Barugo and San Miguel, on the south by Pastrana, on the north-east by Tacloban City, on the east by Santa Fe and on the west by Jaro.On the way to Carigara is a steel bridge spanning the Mainit River and soon after it is a smaller bridge. There was a time when only footpaths existed and when this river was too wide for a leap and too narrow to wade in, the traveler was undecided what to do. Hence the name Alangalang was given to the town, from the vernacular word alang-alang which means "indecision".The strongest tropical typhoon Haiyan, more commonly known as Typhoon Yolanda impacted the provinces when it entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility on November 8, 2013.

List of retired Philippine typhoon names

Since 1963, there have been three agencies who have named tropical cyclones within the north western Pacific Ocean which has often resulted in a cyclone having two names. From 1945 to 2000 the US Navy's Joint Typhoon Warning Center assigned names to tropical cyclones before the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), took over the naming of tropical cyclones in 2000. Both agencies assigned names to tropical cyclones when they intensified into a tropical storm.

Since 1963 the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) has assigned local names to a tropical cyclone should it move into or form as a tropical depression in their area of responsibility located between 135°E and 115°E and between 5°N-25°N even if the cyclone has had an international name assigned to it. All three agencies that have assigned names to tropical cyclones within the Western Pacific have retired the names of significant tropical cyclones, with PAGASA retiring names if a cyclone has caused at least ₱1 billion in damage and or have caused at least 300 deaths within the Philippines.

Since 1963 the naming lists have been revised in 1979, 1985, 2001 and 2005 for various reasons including to help minimize confusion in the historical records and to remove the names that might have negative associations with real persons. Within this list all information with regards to intensity is taken from while the system was in the Philippine area of responsibility and is thus taken from PAGASA's archives, rather than the JTWC or JMA's archives.

Panahon.TV

Panahon.TV (Walang Pinipiling Panahon ang Pagbibigay Impormasyon) is a daily weather news program aired on One PH, the 24-hour Filipino-language news channel of Cignal, which airs from Monday to Friday at 5:00 AM. (UTC+8), direct from the PAGASA Weather and Flood Forecasting Center in Quezon City. This is co-produced by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration PAGASA, together with Lina Group of Companies' communication arm, UBE Media, and Air 21. From its inception on September 10, 2012 until December 31, 2016, the program was aired over PTV-4. It also aired on Great Commission Television (GCTV), also one of BEAM's subchannels. But since its removal from BEAM, all programming switched to Pilipinas HD. The show also airs on MBC's 24-hour cable channel DZRH News Television every Weekdays at 12:00 NN (during DZRH Network News) and 5:00 PM. (UTC+8). In the 4th quarter of 2017, Life TV added the program every weekdays at 6:00 AM.

The program also has Panahon.TV Express every Monday to Friday at 6:00 PM. In several occasions when a weather disturbance entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility, Panahon.TV carried the live press conferences from PAGASA Weather Center and usually extend the Express editions until midnight.

Timeline of the 2005 Pacific typhoon season

The 2005 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it runs year-round in 2005, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

For the PAGASA, 17 systems formed or entered in their area during 2005, which 7 of them directly made landfall over the Philippines.

Timeline of the 2015 Pacific typhoon season

This timeline documents all of the events of the 2015 Pacific typhoon season. Most of the tropical cyclones formed between May and November. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator between 100°E and the International Date Line. This area, called the Western Pacific basin, is the responsibility of the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA). They host and operate the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC), located in Tokyo. The Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA) is also responsible for assigning names to all tropical storms that are formed within the basin. However, any storm that enters or forms in the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) will be named (or renamed) by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) using a local name. Also of note - the Western Pacific basin is monitored by the United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), which gives all Tropical depressions a number with a "W" suffix.

During the season, a total of 36 systems were designated as Tropical Depressions, as determined by the following Meteorological organizations: the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA); the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA); the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC); or one of various other reporting agencies, such as the China Meteorological Administration, or the Hong Kong Observatory. Throughout the 2015 season, 13 systems entered or formed in the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR), with six of them making landfall directly over the Philippines.

The first five months of the season were unusually active and intense due to a developing El Niño. Mekkhala became an early-forming storm of the season and affected the Philippines. Typhoon Higos formed a month after Mekkhala, reaching its peak intensity as a Category 4 typhoon. Higos broke the record as the most intense storm and the easternmost forming storm within the basin during the month of February. During the end of next month, Typhoon Maysak reached its peak intensity as a Category 5 super typhoon with a minimum pressure of 910 millibars, which became the strongest typhoon before the month of April, however Noul became the strongest in terms of windspeeds two months after. In additional, when Dolphin was named on May 9, it became the earliest seventh named storm to form within the basin since 1971. So far this year, ten typhoons underwent rapid deepening.

Tropical Storm Bavi (2015)

Tropical Storm Bavi, known in the Philippines as Tropical Storm Betty, influenced the trade winds over the Pacific Ocean and was partially responsible for one of the strongest trade wind reversals ever observed. The system was first noted as a tropical disturbance during March 8, while it was located to the southeast of Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. Over the next couple of days the system moved north-westwards through the Marshall Islands, before it was classified as a tropical depression during March 10. The system subsequently moved north-westwards and continued to develop further, before it was classified as the third tropical storm of the 2015 Pacific typhoon season and named Bavi by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) during March 11. After continuing its north-westwards movement, the system peaked as a tropical storm during March 14, before it started to weaken as it approached the Mariana Islands. The system subsequently passed over Guam during the next day, before continuing its west-northwestwards movement as it gradually weakened over the next few days. The system entered the Philippine area of responsibility, where it was named Betty by PAGASA during March 17 as the system weakened into a tropical depression. The system was subsequently last noted during March 21, as it dissipated over the Philippines.

Bavi and its precursor tropical disturbance impacted eastern Micronesia, with strong to gale-force winds of between 45–65 km/h (30–40 mph), reported on various atolls in the Marshall Islands. Considerable damage was reported on the islet of Ebeye, on the main atoll of Kwajalein, a small amount of tree damage was reported, while several old steel structures were made too dangerous to use. Overall damages in the Marshall Islands were estimated at US$2.1 million, while a fishing vessel and its crew of nine were reported missing during March 12. After impacting Eastern Micronesia, Bavi approached the Mariana Islands, with its circulation passing over Guam during March 15, where it caused the highest waves to be recorded on the island in a decade. Bavi also impacted the Northern Mariana Islands of Rota, Tinian and Saipan, where power outages were reported and five houses were destroyed. Total property damages within the Mariana Islands were estimated at around US$150 thousand.

Tropical Storm Gardo (disambiguation)

The name Gloria was used by PAGASA for storms that enter their Philippine Area of Responsibility, but due to political reasons, it was replaced with Glenda for the 2006, 2010, and 2014 seasons. But after Typhoon Rammasun devastated Luzon, it was then replaced with Gardo for future seasons.

Tropical Storm Gardo may refer to:

Typhoon Chataan, a supertyphoon which devastated Guam, and was retired with Matmo for its damages, along with its PAGASA name due to political reasons.

Typhoon Kaemi (2006), a typhoon which struck Taiwan and China.

Typhoon Kompasu (2010), a typhoon which headed for Japan and Korea.

Typhoon Rammasun, a catastrophic supertyphoon which devastated the Philippines and struck Manila as a Category 4

Typhoon Xangsane, a 2006 typhoon that struck China as a Category 5 storm, which led to the retirement of Glenda and Rammasun with Gardo and Bualoi for future seasons

Typhoon Maria (2018), a supertyphoon which passed near Guam and headed to strike China as a weakened typhoon.

Typhoon Parma

Typhoon Parma, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Pepeng, was the second typhoon to affect the Philippines within the span of a week during September 2009.

Typhoon Parma was assigned the name Pepeng by PAGASA when it entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility days after Typhoon Ketsana wreaked havoc on the country. Parma spared the capital and instead lashed the northern part of Luzon island.

Parma added to the damage caused by the earlier Typhoon Ketsana, affecting thousands of families on the north, especially on Pangasinan province where the San Roque Dam inadvertently released water to prevent its breach. However, in the first week of October, Parma interacted with the incoming Typhoon Melor on the Pacific (via a Fujiwhara interaction), rendering it stationary as it made landfall on Southern Taiwan. Days later, the greatly weakened Parma retreated back to Luzon making further landfalls on Ilocos Norte and Cagayan. The now severe tropical storm Parma then began to wane its strength as it crossed Luzon island for the second time. It then emerged on the South China Sea as a tropical depression. Parma became one of the deadliest typhoons to hit the Philippines in a decade.

Typhoon Yutu

Typhoon Yutu, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Rosita, was an extremely powerful tropical cyclone that caused catastrophic destruction on the islands of Tinian and Saipan in the Northern Mariana Islands, and later impacted the Philippines. It is the strongest typhoon ever recorded to impact the Mariana Islands, as well as the second-strongest tropical cyclone to strike the United States and its unincorporated territories by both wind speed and barometric pressure; the storm is tied with Hurricane Camille of 1969 for the latter record. Yutu was also the most powerful tropical cyclone worldwide in 2018. The fortieth tropical depression, twenty-sixth named storm, twelfth typhoon, and the seventh super typhoon of the 2018 Pacific typhoon season, Yutu originated from a low-pressure area that formed in the western Pacific Ocean on October 15. The disturbance organized into a tropical depression on the same day, as ocean sea-surface heat content increased. Shortly after becoming a tropical depression, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) assigned the system the identifier 31W. The system continued to strengthen, becoming a tropical storm several hours later, with the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) naming the system Yutu. Increasingly favorable conditions allowed Yutu to explosively intensify, as the system maintained deep convection and subsequently became a severe tropical storm and then a typhoon.

Through October 23, Yutu continued to explosively intensify, quickly reaching Category 5 super typhoon intensity on October 24. On October 25, Yutu made landfall on the island of Tinian and the southern part of Saipan at its peak intensity, with a minimum central pressure of 900 millibars (27 inHg), 10-minute sustained winds of 215 km/h (130 mph), 1-minute sustained winds of 285 km/h (180 mph), and gusts of up to 305 km/h (190 mph). This made it the most powerful tropical cyclone worldwide in 2018. Immediately after making landfall, Yutu underwent an eyewall replacement cycle, causing it to momentarily weaken as it completed the process. Maintaining super typhoon status, Yutu continued to move westward towards the Philippines, entering the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) whereupon it was assigned the local name Rosita. Intrusions of dry air and lower sea surface temperatures, however, caused Yutu to weaken significantly through October 28, though it remained a strong typhoon. Late on October 29, Yutu made landfall in the Filipino province of Isabela, with 10-minute sustained winds of 100 mph (155 km/h). The JTWC estimated 1-minute winds to be 165 km/h (105 mph) at that time.

The storm wrought catastrophic damage across Tinian and Saipan, destroying numerous homes and killing two people. Violent winds destroyed concrete structures in southern Saipan and stripped areas of vegetation. In the Philippines, landslides and flooding killed at least 27 people, while in Hong Kong, one person was killed by high surf.

Typhoons in the Philippines

Approximately twenty tropical cyclones enter the Philippine area of responsibility yearly, an area which incorporates parts of the Pacific Ocean, South China Sea and the Philippine Archipelago (with the exception of Tawi-Tawi province). Among these cyclones, ten will be typhoons, with five having the potential to be destructive ones. The Philippines is "the most exposed country in the world to tropical storms" according to a Time Magazine article in 2013. In the Philippine languages, tropical cyclones are generally called bagyo.Typhoons can hit the Philippines any time of year, with the months of June to September being most active, with August being the most active individual month and May the least active. Typhoons move east to west across the country, heading north as they go. Storms most frequently make landfall on the islands of Eastern Visayas, Bicol region, and northern Luzon whereas the southern island and region of Mindanao is largely free of typhoons. Climate change is likely to worsen the situation with the extreme weather events including typhoons posing various risks and threats to the Philippines.The deadliest overall tropical cyclone to affect the Philippines is believed to have been the Haiphong typhoon which is estimated to have killed up to 20,000 people as it passed over the country in September 1881. In modern meteorological records, the deadliest storm was Typhoon Yolanda (international name Haiyan), which became the strongest landfalling tropical cyclone ever recorded as it crossed the Visayas in central Philippines on November 7–8, 2013. The wettest known tropical cyclone to impact the archipelago was the July 14–18, 1911 cyclone which dropped over 2,210 millimetres (87 in) of rainfall within a 3-day, 15-hour period in Baguio. Tropical cyclones usually account for at least 30 percent of the annual rainfall in the northern Philippines while being responsible for less than 10 percent of the annual rainfall in the southern islands. PAGASA Senior Weather Specialist Anthony Lucero told the newsite Rappler that the number of destructive typhoons have increased recently but it is too early to call it a trend.Tropical cyclones entering the Philippine Area of Responsibility are given a local name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA), which also raises public storm signal warnings as deemed necessary.Preparation and response to typhoons is coordinated by the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC). Each Philippine province and local government in the Philippines has a corresponding Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office (DRRMO). Each provincial and local government is required to set aside 5% of its yearly budget for disaster risk reduction, preparations, and response.The frequency of typhoons in the Philippines have made the typhoons a significant part of everyday ancient and modern Filipino culture.

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