Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame

The Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame is a collection of plaques, mounted on a brick wall next to the Left Field Gate at Citizens Bank Park, the ballpark of the Philadelphia Phillies. From 1978 to 2003, the Phillies inducted one figure from their franchise history and one notable person from the Philadelphia Athletics (A's) organization each year—with the exception of 1983, when the Phillies inducted their Centennial Team.[1] Once Veterans Stadium closed in 2003, the wall plaques used to recognize the Phillies' members were moved to Citizens Bank Park; however, the Phillies no longer induct notable Athletics.[2] Each person inducted into the Wall of Fame was honored with a metal plaque showing the person's face; their position with, and years of service to the team; and a summary of their most important contributions. In March 2004, the Athletics' plaques were relocated to the Philadelphia Athletics Historical Society in Hatboro, Pennsylvania, and a single plaque listing all of the A's inductees was attached to a statue of Connie Mack located across the street from Citizens Bank Park.[3]

Originally, the goal of the Wall of Fame was to induct the greatest players in Phillies and Athletics history;[4] however, exceptions have been made for non-players who have made significant contributions to the organization. Mack, the Athletics' first inductee, had an 11-year playing career in the National League and the Players' League,[5] but is most remembered for his managerial career,[6] and was honored as such on the Wall. Members have been inducted for contributions in more than one area; Paul Owens, inducted in 1988, spent 48 years as a member of the Phillies organization, contributing as a scout, manager, general manager, and team executive.[7] The Phillies have inducted four first basemen, four second basemen, five third basemen, three shortstops, one utility infielder, three catchers, 21 outfielders, 18 pitchers, seven managers, one general manager, one coach, two team executives, and two sportscasters. Twenty-one members of the Wall of Fame are also members of the Baseball Hall of Fame. All of the inductees in the first four seasons from both teams are members; Del Ennis was the first non-member to be inducted.

The first figures to be inducted into the Wall of Fame were Robin Roberts, who was inducted for the Phillies; and Mack, inducted for the A's. Roberts pitched in Philadelphia for 13 seasons as a member of the National League team,[8] and Mack managed the American League club from 1901 to 1950.[9] Although the Athletics have retired no numbers for players from their Philadelphia years, all seven players for whom the Phillies have retired a number or honored a "P" have been inducted into the Wall of Fame: Roberts (1978), Richie Ashburn (1979), Chuck Klein (1980), Grover Cleveland Alexander (1981), Jim Bunning (1984), Steve Carlton (1989), and Mike Schmidt (1990).[1][10]

On April 10, 2017, it was announced Pete Rose would be that year's inductee into the wall of fame.[11] However, on August 12, 2017, just 10 days before the ceremony, the Phillies announced Rose would not be inducted amid statutory rape allegations.[12] Instead of inducting someone new, they celebrated past inductees.

For the 2018 season Citizens Bank Park was renovated, resulting in the Phillies Wall of Fame being moved from Ashburn Alley.[13] A new Wall of Fame area was created behind the Left Field scoreboard, next to the Left Field gate. This overhauled Left Field Plaza honors the team’s history and incorporates new concession offerings.[14] Featuring large replicas of the team’s World Series trophies from 1980 and 2008, statues of its retired numbers along with the relocated Wall of Fame it is an area for fans to learn about and honor the team's past.

PhilliesWallofFame
The former location of the Phillies Wall of Fame, in Ashburn Alley at Citizens Bank Park

Inductees

Harry Kalas, inducted 2009

Phillies-Parade Harry-K crop
Key to symbols and abbreviations used in tables below
Inducted Links to the article about the corresponding Major League Baseball season.
Years Link to the articles about the Major League Baseball seasons in which the player participated with their inducted team
P Pitcher (RHP indicates right-handed; LHP indicates left-handed)
C Catcher
1B First baseman
2B Second baseman
3B Third baseman
SS Shortstop
OF Outfielder
MGR Manager
GM General manager
EXEC Team executive
CO Coach
TV Team sportscaster (television and/or radio)
Hall of Fame Member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum
Bold Recipient of the Hall of Fame's Ford C. Frick Award
Connie Mack in 1911
Connie Mack, inducted 1978

Jim Bunning, inducted 1984

Jim Bunning as ballplayer

Mike Schmidt, inducted 1990

Mike Schmidt plaque
Mike Schmidt

Juan Samuel, inducted 2008

Juan Samuel
Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame
Inducted Player Team[a] Position Years Ref
1978 Robin RobertsHall of Fame[b] Philadelphia Phillies P 19481961 [8]
1978 Connie MackHall of Fame Philadelphia Athletics MGR 19011950 [9]
1979 Richie AshburnHall of Fame[b] Philadelphia Phillies OF
TV
19481959
19631997
[15]
1979 Jimmie FoxxHall of Fame Philadelphia Athletics 1B 19251935 [16]
1980 Chuck KleinHall of Fame[b] Philadelphia Phillies OF 19281933
19361939
19401944
[17]
1980 Lefty GroveHall of Fame Philadelphia Athletics P 19251933 [18]
1981 Grover Cleveland AlexanderHall of Fame[b] Philadelphia Phillies P 19111917
1930
[19]
1981 Al SimmonsHall of Fame Philadelphia Athletics P 19241932
19401941
1944
[20]
1982 Del Ennis Philadelphia Phillies OF 19461956 [21]
1982 Mickey CochraneHall of Fame Philadelphia Athletics C 19251933 [22]
1983 no inductees—see Centennial Team
1984 Jim BunningHall of Fame[b] Philadelphia Phillies P 19641969
19701971
[23]
1984 Jimmy Dykes Philadelphia Athletics 2B/3B
MGR
19181932
19511953
[24]
1985 Ed DelahantyHall of Fame Philadelphia Phillies OF 18881889
18911901
[25]
1985 Eddie PlankHall of Fame Philadelphia Athletics P 19011914 [26]
1986 Cy Williams Philadelphia Phillies OF 19181930 [27]
1986 Rube WaddellHall of Fame Philadelphia Athletics P 19021907 [28]
1987 Granny Hamner Philadelphia Phillies SS 19441959 [29]
1987 Eddie CollinsHall of Fame Philadelphia Athletics 2B 19061914
19271930
[30]
1988 Paul Owens Philadelphia Phillies MGR
GM
EXEC
197219831984
19721983
19842003
[7][31]
1988 Wally Moses Philadelphia Athletics OF 19351941
19491951
[32]
1989 Steve CarltonHall of Fame[b] Philadelphia Phillies P 19721986 [33]
1989 Bob Johnson Philadelphia Athletics OF 19331942 [34]
1990 Mike SchmidtHall of Fame[b] Philadelphia Phillies 3B 19721989 [35]
1990 Elmer Valo Philadelphia Athletics OF 19401943
19461956
[36]
1991 Larry Bowa Philadelphia Phillies SS
MGR
19701981
20012004
[37]
1991 Chief BenderHall of Fame Philadelphia Athletics P 19031914 [38]
1992 Chris Short Philadelphia Phillies P 19591972 [39]
1992 Jack Coombs Philadelphia Athletics P 19061914 [40]
1993 Curt Simmons Philadelphia Phillies P 19471960 [41]
1993 Frank "Home Run" BakerHall of Fame Philadelphia Athletics 3B 19081914 [42]
1994 Dick Allen Philadelphia Phillies 1B/3B/OF 19631969
19751976
[43]
1994 Bobby Shantz Philadelphia Athletics P 19491956 [44]
1995 Willie Jones Philadelphia Phillies 3B 19471959 [45]
1995 Eddie Joost Philadelphia Athletics SS
MGR
19471954
1954
[46]
1996 Sam ThompsonHall of Fame Philadelphia Phillies OF 18891898 [47]
1996 Eddie Rommel Philadelphia Athletics P 19201932 [48]
1997 Johnny Callison Philadelphia Phillies OF 19601969 [49]
1997 Ferris Fain Philadelphia Athletics 1B 19471952 [50]
1998 Greg Luzinski Philadelphia Phillies OF 19701980 [51]
1998 Bing Miller Philadelphia Athletics OF 19221926
19281934
[52]
1999 Tug McGraw Philadelphia Phillies P 19751984 [53]
1999 Sam Chapman Philadelphia Athletics OF 19381951 [54]
2000 Gavvy Cravath Philadelphia Phillies OF
MGR
19121920
19191920
[55]
2000 George Earnshaw Philadelphia Athletics P 19281933 [56]
2001 Garry Maddox Philadelphia Phillies OF 19751986 [57]
2001 Gus Zernial Philadelphia Athletics OF 19511957 [58]
2002 Tony Taylor Philadelphia Phillies 2B 19601971
19741976
[59]
2002 Rube Walberg Philadelphia Athletics P 19231933 [60]
2003 Sherry Magee Philadelphia Phillies OF 19041914 [61]
2003 Rube Oldring Philadelphia Athletics OF 19061916
1918
[62]
2004 Billy HamiltonHall of Fame Philadelphia Phillies OF 18901895 [63]
2005 Bob Boone Philadelphia Phillies C 19721982 [64]
2006 Dallas Green Philadelphia Phillies P
MGR
19601967
19791981
[65][66]
2007 John Vukovich Philadelphia Phillies INF
CO
EXEC
1970197119761981
19882004
20042007
[67]
2008 Juan Samuel Philadelphia Phillies 2B
CO
19831989
20112017
[68]
2009 Harry KalasHall of Fame Philadelphia Phillies TV 19712009 [69]
2010 Darren Daulton Philadelphia Phillies C 1983
19851997
[70]
2011 John Kruk Philadelphia Phillies 1B
TV
19891994
2017–present
[71]
2012 Mike Lieberthal Philadelphia Phillies C 19942006 [72]
2013 Curt Schilling Philadelphia Phillies P 19922000 [73]
2014 Charlie Manuel Philadelphia Phillies MGR 20052013 [74]
2015 Pat Burrell Philadelphia Phillies OF 20002008
2016 Jim ThomeHall of Fame Philadelphia Phillies 1B 20032005, 2012
2017 no inductees–see Pete Rose
2018 Pat GillickHall of Fame Philadelphia Phillies GM
EXEC
20052008
2008–present
[75]
2018 Roy HalladayHall of Fame Philadelphia Phillies P 20102013 [76]

Centennial Team

Centennial Team
The Centennial Team plaque at the left end of the Wall of Fame

In 1983, rather than inducting a player into the Wall of Fame, the Phillies selected their Centennial Team,[77] commemorating the best players of the first 100 years in franchise history. The Centennial Team includes players from several periods in Phillies history. The team is honored with a plaque listing the names of all players selected at the left end of the Wall of Fame. 11 members of the Centennial Team also have their own individual plaques on the Wall; those not otherwise included on the Wall are Manny Trillo, Jim Konstanty, and Pete Rose.

List of players honored as Centennial Team members
Player Position
Richie AshburnHall of Fame[b] CF
Bob Boone C
Larry Bowa SS
Steve CarltonHall of Fame[b] LHP
Garry Maddox CF
Dallas Green MGR
Jim Konstanty RHP
Del Ennis OF
Tug McGraw LHP
Robin RobertsHall of Fame[b] RHP
Pete Rose 1B
Mike SchmidtHall of Fame[b] 3B
Manny Trillo 2B
Phillies Wall of Fame
The Phillies' Wall of Fame at Citizens Bank Park in 2008. The Centennial Team plaque is placed in the bottom row on the left-hand side of the image.

Footnotes

  • a The induction committee judges entrants based on "longevity, ability, contributions to the [team] and baseball, character and special achievements".[78] The committee has consisted of a variety of personnel, including team executives and members of the media.[79]
  • b This denotes that the player's number has been retired by his respective team.[10] The Athletics have not retired any numbers from those who played their careers in Philadelphia.[80]

References

General
  • "Phillies Wall of Fame". Phillies.MLB.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  • "Philadelphia Wall of Fame". Philadelphia Athletics Historical Society. Archived from the original on April 10, 2010. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
Inline citations
  1. ^ a b "Phillies Wall of Fame". Phillies.MLB.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  2. ^ Montella, Ernie (June 5, 2004). "Wall of Fame Day in Hatboro, PA". Philadelphia Athletics Historical Society. Archived from the original on December 19, 2010. Retrieved October 5, 2009.
  3. ^ Jordan, David M. "Vet Plaques Come to Hatboro". Philadelphia Athletics Historical Society. Archived from the original on September 6, 2008. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  4. ^ "Kalas to be inducted into Wall of Fame". Philadelphia Daily News. May 28, 2009. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  5. ^ "Connie Mack Batting Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  6. ^ "Mack, Connie". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved June 26, 2011.
  7. ^ a b "Drabek, Taylor named winners of Paul Owens Awards". Phillies.MLB.com. September 2, 2009. Archived from the original on April 3, 2012. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  8. ^ a b "Robin Roberts Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  9. ^ a b "Connie Mack Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  10. ^ a b "Phillies Retired numbers". Phillies.MLB.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  11. ^ "Pete Rose is Phillies' 2017 Wall of Fame inductee". Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  12. ^ "Phillies cancel Pete Rose Wall of Fame ceremony amid statutory rape allegations". Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  13. ^ "Phillies announce Citizens Bank Park changes". MLB.com. Retrieved 2018-07-09.
  14. ^ "2018 Preview: Citizens Bank Park, Philadelphia Phillies". Ballpark Digest. 2018-04-04. Retrieved 2018-07-09.
  15. ^ "Richie Ashburn Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  16. ^ "Jimmie Foxx Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  17. ^ "Chuck Klein Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  18. ^ "Lefty Grove Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  19. ^ "Pete Alexander Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  20. ^ "Al Simmons Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  21. ^ "Del Ennis Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  22. ^ "Mickey Cochrane Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  23. ^ "Jim Bunning Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  24. ^ "Jimmie Dykes Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  25. ^ "Ed Delahanty Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  26. ^ "Eddie Plank Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  27. ^ "Cy Williams Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  28. ^ "Rube Waddell Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  29. ^ "Granny Hamner Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  30. ^ "Eddie Collins Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  31. ^ "Paul Owens Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  32. ^ "Wally Moses Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  33. ^ "Steve Carlton Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  34. ^ "Bob Johnson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  35. ^ "Mike Schmidt Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  36. ^ "Elmer Valo Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  37. ^ "Larry Bowa Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  38. ^ "Chief Bender Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  39. ^ "Chris Short Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  40. ^ "Jack Coombs Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  41. ^ "Curt Simmons Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  42. ^ "Frank Baker Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  43. ^ "Dick Allen Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  44. ^ "Bobby Shantz Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  45. ^ "Willie Jones Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  46. ^ "Eddie Joost Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  47. ^ "Sam Thompson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  48. ^ "Eddie Rommel Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  49. ^ "Johnny Callison Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  50. ^ "Ferris Fain Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  51. ^ "Greg Luzinski Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  52. ^ "Bing Miller Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  53. ^ "Tug McGraw Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  54. ^ "Sam Chapman Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  55. ^ "Gavvy Cravath Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  56. ^ "George Earnshaw Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  57. ^ "Garry Maddox Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  58. ^ "Gus Zernial Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  59. ^ "Tony Taylor Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  60. ^ "Rube Walberg Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  61. ^ "Sherry Magee Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  62. ^ "Rube Oldring Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  63. ^ "Billy Hamilton Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  64. ^ "Bob Boone Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  65. ^ "Dallas Green Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  66. ^ "Dallas Green Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  67. ^ Mandel, Ken (March 8, 2007). "Vukovich passes away at 59". Phillies.MLB.com. Archived from the original on August 29, 2009. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  68. ^ "Juan Samuel Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  69. ^ Gurian-Peck, David. "Kalas to be inducted into Wall of Fame". Phillies.MLB.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  70. ^ Zolecki, Todd; Schonbrun, Zach (June 23, 2010). "Daulton is Phils' Wall of Fame inductee". Phillies.MLB.com. Archived from the original on June 28, 2010. Retrieved June 23, 2010.
  71. ^ Parrillo, Ray (August 13, 2011). "Kruk takes his place on Wall of Fame". Philly.com. Philadelphia Media Network. Archived from the original on August 14, 2011. Retrieved August 13, 2011.
  72. ^ "Lieberthal Selected to Phillies' Wall of Fame". Philly.com. Philadelphia Media Network. June 7, 2012. Archived from the original on August 14, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2012.
  73. ^ "Curt Schilling enshrined, but Darren Daulton star of night". Philly.com. Philadelphia Media Network. August 3, 2013. Archived from the original on August 14, 2011. Retrieved August 3, 2013.
  74. ^ "'Humbled' Manuel honored by Phillies". Philly.com. Philadelphia Media Network. August 10, 2014. Retrieved August 10, 2014.
  75. ^ Needelman, Joshua (August 4, 2018). "Doc takes place on Phillies Wall of Fame". MLB.com. Retrieved August 5, 2018.
  76. ^ Zolecki, Todd (August 3, 2018). "Former GM Gillick to join Phillies Wall of Fame". MLB.com. Retrieved August 5, 2018.
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  80. ^ "Athletics Retired numbers". Athletics.MLB.com. Retrieved September 19, 2009.

External links

Elmer Valo

Elmer William Valo (March 5, 1921 – July 19, 1998), born Imrich Valo, was a Slovak American professional baseball right fielder, coach, and scout in Major League Baseball (MLB). He batted left-handed and threw right-handed.

Playing in the major leagues for 20 seasons between 1940 and 1961, Valo batted .282, with 58 home runs, and 601 runs batted in (RBI), in 1,806 games, with most of his time spent as a member of the Athletics franchise, which was then located in Philadelphia and Kansas City.

Jack Coombs

John Wesley "Jack" Coombs (November 18, 1882 – April 15, 1957), nicknamed "Colby Jack" after his alma mater, was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as a pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics (1906–14), Brooklyn Robins (1915–18), and Detroit Tigers (1920). Coombs set a number of American League and World League records which still stand and, when he won 31 games while losing nine in 1910, he became one of only 13 pitchers to win 30 games in a season since 1900.

List of Philadelphia Phillies owners and executives

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball (MLB) team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Phillies compete in MLB as a member club of the National League (NL) East division. In the franchise's history, the owners and ownership syndicates of the team have employed 11 general managers (GMs) and appointed 15 team presidents. The GM controls player transactions, hiring and firing of the coaching staff, and negotiates with players and agents regarding contracts. The team president is the representative for the owner or the ownership group within the front office and is responsible for overseeing the team's staff, minor league farm system, and scouting.The longest-tenured general manager is Paul Owens, with 11 years of service to the team in that role, from 1972 to 1983. Owens also served as the team manager in 1972, and from 1983 to 1984. After this time, he served as a team executive until 2003, and was inducted into the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame in recognition of his services. The longest-tenured owner is Bob Carpenter, Jr., who was the team's primary shareholder from 1943 to 1972. He appointed the team's first general manager, Herb Pennock, during his tenure. In combination with his son, Ruly, the Carpenter family owned the Phillies for nearly 50 years (until 1981) until it was sold to Bill Giles, son of former league president Warren Giles. After Giles sold his part-ownership share, the Phillies are currently owned by John S. Middleton, Jim & Pete Buck, and former team President David Montgomery. The Phillies are currently overseen by team president Andy MacPhail and GM Matt Klentak.

Mike Lieberthal

Michael Scott "Lieby" Lieberthal (born January 18, 1972) is a former Major League Baseball catcher. He batted and threw right-handed.

In a 14-year career, Lieberthal played for the Philadelphia Phillies (1994–2006) and the Los Angeles Dodgers (2007). He compiled a career batting average of .274, with 150 home runs and 610 runs batted in. During his career he won the Gold Glove Award, and was twice an All Star.His 1999 season (.300, 31 home runs, 96 RBIs, Gold Glove Award) was arguably the best ever of any Phillies catcher, and Lieberthal caught more games in his career than any other Phillies catcher (1,139). His career 149 home runs at catcher were the most in team history. Lieberthal had a .310 batting average, a .381 on-base percentage, and .510 slugging percentage lifetime against left-handed pitching.Lieberthal was inducted into the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame on August 10, 2012.

Oakland Athletics

The Oakland Athletics, often referred to as the A's, are an American professional baseball team based in Oakland, California. They compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) West division. The team plays its home games at the RingCentral Coliseum. They have won nine World Series championships, tied for the third-most of all current MLB teams. The 2017 season was the club's 50th while based in Oakland.

One of the American League's eight charter franchises, the team was founded in Philadelphia in 1901 as the Philadelphia Athletics. They won three World Series championships from 1910 to 1913 and back-to-back titles in 1929 and 1930. The team's owner and manager for its first 50 years was Connie Mack and Hall of Fame players included Chief Bender, Frank "Home Run" Baker, Jimmie Foxx, and Lefty Grove. The team left Philadelphia for Kansas City in 1955 and became the Kansas City Athletics before moving to Oakland in 1968. They won three consecutive World Championships between 1972 and 1974, led by players including Vida Blue, Catfish Hunter, Reggie Jackson, ace reliever Rollie Fingers, and colorful owner Charlie O. Finley. After being sold by Finley to Walter A. Haas Jr., the team won three consecutive pennants and the 1989 World Series behind the "Bash Brothers", Jose Canseco and Mark McGwire, as well as Hall of Famers Dennis Eckersley, Rickey Henderson and manager Tony La Russa.

From 1901 to 2018, the Athletics' overall win–loss record is 8,931–9,387 (.488).

Oakland Athletics award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Oakland Athletics professional baseball franchise.

The team was first known as the Philadelphia Athletics from 1901 to 1954 and then as the Kansas City Athletics from 1955 to 1967.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 202 players have had surnames beginning with the letter M, which is the largest total of any single letter, followed by S with 187 players. The highest numbers of individual batters belongs to M (115), and S has the most pitchers (90). The letters with the smallest representation are Q (5 players), U (6 players), Z (7 players), and Y (8 players); however, there has never been a Phillies player, nor a player in Major League Baseball history, whose surname begins with the letter X.Thirty-two players in Phillies history have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Those players for whom the Hall recognizes the Phillies as their primary team include Grover Cleveland Alexander, Richie Ashburn, Dave Bancroft, Steve Carlton, Ed Delahanty, Billy Hamilton, Chuck Klein, Robin Roberts, Mike Schmidt, and Sam Thompson; manager Harry Wright was also inducted for his contributions with the club. The Phillies have retired numbers for six players, including Schmidt (#20), Carlton (#32), Ashburn (#1), Roberts (#36), and Jim Bunning (#14); the sixth retired number is Jackie Robinson's #42, which was retired throughout baseball in 1997. The Phillies also honor two additional players with the letter "P" in the manner of a retired number: Alexander played before numbers were used in the major leagues; and Klein wore a variety of numbers in his Phillies career.Thirty-six Phillies players have been elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame. All of the players listed above (save Robinson) have been elected; also included are Dick Allen, Bob Boone, Larry Bowa, Johnny Callison, Gavvy Cravath, Darren Daulton, Del Ennis, Jimmie Foxx, Dallas Green, Granny Hamner, Willie Jones, John Kruk, Mike Lieberthal, Greg Luzinski, Garry Maddox, Sherry Magee, Tug McGraw, Juan Samuel, Curt Schilling, Bobby Shantz, Chris Short, Curt Simmons, Tony Taylor, John Vukovich, and Cy Williams. Foxx and Shantz were inducted for their contributions as members of the Philadelphia Athletics. Two non-players are also members of the Wall of Fame for their contributions to the Phillies: broadcaster Harry Kalas; and manager, general manager, and team executive Paul Owens.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (A)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 51 have had surnames beginning with the letter A. Three of those players have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: pitcher Grover Cleveland Alexander, who played for the Phillies from 1911 to 1917 and again in 1930; second baseman Sparky Anderson, who played for the team in 1959 and was inducted to the Hall of Fame as a manager; and center fielder Richie Ashburn, who was a Phillie from 1948 to 1959. The Hall of Fame lists the Phillies as the primary team for both Alexander and Ashburn, and they are members of the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame, as is Dick Allen. Ashburn's number 1 has been retired by the Phillies, who have also honored Alexander with a representation of the letter "P"; he played before uniform numbers were used in Major League Baseball. Ashburn also holds a franchise record; his 1,811 career singles are best among all of Philadelphia's players.Among the 34 batters in this list, catcher Hezekiah Allen has the highest batting average: a .667 mark, with two hits in his three plate appearances. Other players with an average above .300 include Bobby Abreu (.303 in nine seasons), Jim Adduci (.368 in one season), Ethan Allen (.316 in three seasons), Stan Andrews (.333 in one season), Joe Antolick (.333 in one season), Buzz Arlett (.313 in one season), and Ashburn (.311 in twelve seasons). Richie Allen's 204 home runs lead Phillies players whose names begin with A, as do Abreu's 814 runs batted in.Of this list's 17 pitchers, Antonio Alfonseca has the best win–loss record, in terms of winning percentage; his five wins and two losses notched him a .714 win ratio in his one season with the team. Alexander has the most wins (190), losses (91), and strikeouts (1,409), as well as the lowest earned run average (2.18) among qualifying pitchers; the only player to best Alexander in that category on this list is outfielder Mike Anderson, who made one pitching appearance in 1979, throwing one inning and allowing no runs (a 0.00 ERA).

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (D)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 99 have had surnames beginning with the letter D. Two of those players have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: outfielder Ed Delahanty, who played two stints for Philadelphia—from 1888 to 1889, and again from 1891 to 1901; and outfielder Hugh Duffy, who was a Phillie for three seasons (1904–1906) after being out of the major leagues for two years. The Hall of Fame lists the Phillies as Delahanty's primary team, and he is a member of the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame, as is catcher Darren Daulton. Delahanty holds two franchise records, amassing 442 doubles and 157 triples to lead all Phillies in those categories. Pitcher Bill Duggleby also holds a record; he hit 81 batters in his eight-year career in Philadelphia.Among the 60 batters in this list, outfielder Vern Duncan's .417 batting average is the highest mark; he amassed five hits in twelve plate appearances with Philadelphia. Other players with an average above .300 include Dick Davis (.311 in two seasons), Kiddo Davis (.302 in two seasons), Spud Davis (.321 in eight seasons), Delahanty (.348 in eleven seasons), Alexander Donoghue (.318 in one season), and George Durning (.357 in one season). Daulton's 134 home runs and Delahanty's 1,288 runs batted in lead all players whose surnames begin with D.Of this list's 40 pitchers, Valerio de los Santos and Robert Dodd share the best win–loss record by winning percentage; each won one game while losing none. Duggleby's 90 wins and 99 losses are most among the members of this list, as are his 445 strikeouts. Dave Downs' 2.74 earned run average (ERA) in the only season of his career is the best mark in that category. Red Donahue is one of the ten Phillies pitchers who have thrown a no-hitter, accomplishing the feat on July 8, 1898.One player, Ed Daily, has made 30% or more of his Phillies appearances as a pitcher and a position player. He amassed a 42–36 pitching record with a 2.77 ERA while batting .230 with six home runs as an outfielder.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (E–F)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 32 have had surnames beginning with the letter E, and 79 beginning with the letter F. Three of those players have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: second baseman Johnny Evers, who played for the Phillies during the 1917 season; right fielder Elmer Flick, who played four seasons for Philadelphia; and first baseman Jimmie Foxx, who was a Phillie during the 1945 season. Two players, Foxx and Del Ennis, are members of the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame. During his 11-season career with Philadelphia (1946–1956), right fielder Ennis, a member of the 1950 team nicknamed the Whiz Kids, notched 634 extra-base hits and scored 891 runs. Foxx was inducted into the Wall of Fame for his contributions as a member of the Philadelphia Athletics.Among the 59 batters in this list, left fielder Spoke Emery has the highest batting average, at .667; he hit safely two times in three career at-bats with Philadelphia. Other players with an average over .300 include Jim Eisenreich (.324 in four seasons), Flick (.338 in four seasons), Lew Fonseca (.319 in one season), and Ed Freed (.303 in one season). Ennis leads all members of this list in home runs and runs batted in, with 259 and 1,124, respectively. Flick's 29 home runs lead those players whose surnames start with F, although he had nearly twice as many triples (57); and he is followed closely by Pedro Feliz (26 home runs). Flick also leads those batters in runs batted in, with 377 in four years.Of this list's 54 pitchers, six pitchers share the best win–loss record, in terms of winning percentage. Paul Erickson won two games for the Phillies without losing any, and five pitchers sport a 1–0 record: Tom Edens, Sergio Escalona, Paul Fletcher, Dana Fillingim, and Foxx, who pitched in nine games for the Phillies despite being primarily a first baseman. Flaherty owns the lowest earned run average (ERA), having appeared in one game, pitching ​1⁄3 inning and allowing no runs for an ERA of 0.00. Among the pitchers who have allowed runs, the best ERAs belong to Foxx and Steve Fireovid, who each have an average of 1.59 earned runs allowed per game. Scott Eyre's 1.62 earned run average from his two seasons with Philadelphia are the best among the pitchers whose surnames begin with E. Jumbo Elliott (36 wins and 205 strikeouts) and Charlie Ferguson (99 wins and 728 strikeouts) are tops in those categories among their respective lists; the latter is also one of the ten Phillies pitchers who have thrown a no-hitter, doing so on August 29, 1885, the first in franchise history. Chick Fraser also accomplished the feat on September 18, 1903.Two Phillies have made 30% or more of their Phillies appearances as both pitchers and position players. In addition to Flaherty's statistics listed above, Harry Felix batted .135 with two runs batted in as a third baseman while amassing a 4.85 ERA and striking out three as a pitcher.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (G)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 82 have had surnames beginning with the letter G. No members of this list have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, but Dallas Green was elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame. In addition to being a Phillies pitcher in 1960, and again from 1964 to 1967, Green was named the Phillies manager in 1979 and led Philadelphia to the first World Series championship in franchise history in 1980. Though no Phillies on this list hold career franchise records, Kid Gleason does hold a single-season record; he won 38 games as a pitcher during the 1890 season before converting to a full-time second baseman later in his career.Among the 50 batters in this list, second baseman Gid Gardner has the best batting average, at .667; he hit safely twice in three at-bats with the Phillies. Other players with an average above .300 include Dave Gallagher (.318 in one season), William Gallagher (.306 in one season), Mike Grady (.331 in four seasons), Lew Graulich (.308 in one season), and Emil Gross (.307 in one season). Tony González leads all batters on this list with 77 home runs and 438 runs batted in in nine seasons with Philadelphia.Of this list's 33 pitchers, Geoff Geary has the best win–loss record by winning percentage; he won thirteen games and lost four in five seasons with the Phillies. Gleason's 78 career victories lead all pitchers in this list, as do his 70 losses. The earned run average (ERA) leader is left fielder Greg Gross, who made two pitching appearances during his ten-season career in Philadelphia, allowing no runs in five innings pitched; among pitchers, Gene Garber leads with a 2.68 ERA. Tommy Greene is one of the ten Phillies pitchers who have thrown a no-hitter, accomplishing the feat on May 23, 1991.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (I–J)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 10 have had surnames beginning with the letter I, and 57 beginning with the letter J. Two members of this list have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: pitcher Ferguson Jenkins, who played two seasons with Philadelphia before joining the Chicago Cubs; and first baseman Hughie Jennings, whose tenure with the Phillies encompassed the 1901 and 1902 seasons. One list member was also elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame; Willie "Puddin' Head" Jones was the starting third baseman for the Whiz Kids during his 13 seasons with the team.Among the 34 batters in this list, Orlando Isales has the highest batting average, at .400; he collected two hits in five at-bats during the Phillies' 1980 championship season. Other players with an average over .300 include Tadahito Iguchi (.303 in one season); and Jay Johnstone (.303 in five seasons), who has the highest mark among the players whose surnames begin with J. Jones leads all players on this list with 180 home runs and 753 runs batted in (RBI). Raúl Ibañez leads the I-named players with 70 home runs and 260 RBI.Of this list's 33 pitchers, two share the best win–loss record, in terms of winning percentage: Alex Jones won one game and lost none; and Eric Junge collected a 2–0 record in two seasons with Philadelphia. Larry Jackson leads all pitchers in this list with 41 victories, while Syl Johnson's 51 defeats are the highest total in that category. Jackson's 373 strikeouts are the best total of any pitcher in this list. Among the pitchers whose names begin with I, Ham Iburg leads in wins (11), losses (18), winning percentage (.379), and strikeouts (106).

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (K)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 68 have had surnames beginning with the letter K. Two of those players have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: pitcher Tim Keefe, who holds the record for the lowest single-season earned run average (ERA) in major league history; and right fielder Chuck Klein, who played 15 seasons for Philadelphia in three separate stints. The Phillies are listed by the Hall of Fame as Klein's primary team. He is one of two members of this list to be elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame—the other being John Kruk— and holds two franchise records (career slugging percentage – .553; career on-base plus slugging – .935). Klein is the only player on this list for whom the Phillies have retired a number; since he began play with Philadelphia before uniform numbers were widely in use and wore a variety of numbers throughout his Phillies career, he is represented by the letter "P" rather than a specific number.Among the 32 batters in this list, Klein has the highest batting average, at .326; other players with an average over .300 include Bill Keister (.320 in one season), Ed Konetchy (.321 in one season), and Kruk (.309 in six seasons). Klein also leads all players on this list with 243 home runs and 983 runs batted in.Of this list's 36 pitchers, two—Jack Kucek and Bob Kuzava—have undefeated win–loss records; each has won one game and lost none. Jim Konstanty, the closer for the Whiz Kids, has 51 victories and 39 defeats, most among this list's pitchers; Keefe's 226 strikeouts lead in that category. Johnny Klippstein compiled this list's lowest earned run average, with a 2.28 average in two seasons with Philadelphia.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (N–O)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 33 have had surnames beginning with the letter N, and 26 beginning with the letter O. One member of this list has been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame; pitcher Kid Nichols played two seasons for the Phillies (1905–1906). No Phillies players with surnames beginning with N or O have been inducted into the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame; however, Paul Owens was a team manager, general manager, and executive from 1972 to 2003. No members of this list hold franchise records, nor have any numbers been retired for them.Among the 33 batters in this list, Lefty O'Doul has the highest batting average, at .391; he played for the Phillies during the 1929 and 1930 seasons. Other players with an average over .300 include Lou Novikoff (.304 in one season; the only player whose surname begins with N to bat over .300), Dink O'Brien (.333 in one season), and Al Oliver (.312 in one season). Ron Northey leads all members of this list with 60 home runs and 273 runs batted in; among players whose surname begins with O, O'Doul leads with 54 and 219, respectively.Of this list's 28 pitchers, three share the best win–loss record, in terms of winning percentage: Red Nelson, Jerry Nops, and Eddie Oropesa each have a 1.000 winning percentage, Nelson having won two games and lost none, and Nops and Oropesa each winning one game without a loss. Al Orth, in his seven seasons as a Phillies, accumulated 100 victories and 72 defeats, tops in both categories on this list; among pitchers whose surname begins with N, Nichols' 10 wins and Dickie Noles' 11 losses are highest. Orth and Noles also lead their respective lists in strikeouts: Orth with 359, and Noles with 133. Roy Oswalt's 1.74 earned run average (ERA) is the lowest among members of this list; of the pitchers whose surname begins with N, Nichols' 2.83 ERA is best.One player, Jack Neagle, has made 30% or more of his Phillies appearances as a pitcher and a position player. He amassed a 1–7 pitching record with a 6.90 ERA while batting in four runs as a left fielder.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (R)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 97 have had surnames beginning with the letter R. Two of those players have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: pitcher Eppa Rixey, who was a Phillie for six seasons in two different stints (1912–1917, 1919); and Robin Roberts, who won 20 games during the 1950 season as the ace pitcher of the Whiz Kids. The Hall of Fame lists the Phillies as Roberts' primary team; during his career, the right-hander won 234 games and lost 199, the latter one of his three franchise records. During his 14 seasons with the team, he pitched 3,739 ​1⁄3 innings and completed 272 games, both records; he also held the major league record for most career home runs allowed until it was broken in 2010. Roberts was also elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame as the Phillies' first inductee in 1978.Among the 49 batters in this list, second baseman Lou Raymond has the highest batting average, at .500; he notched one hit in two career at-bats. No other player on this list has batted above .300; the next-highest average belongs to Pete Rose, Major League Baseball's all-time hits leader, who batted .291 in his five seasons with Philadelphia. Jimmy Rollins leads all members of this list in home runs and runs batted in, with 154 and 662, respectively.Of this list's 48 pitchers, Chuck Ricci has the best win–loss record, in terms of winning percentage; he won one game and lost none in his seven appearances with the Phillies. Roberts' 234 victories and 199 defeats are the highest totals in this list, and he also leads in strikeouts, with 1,871. Ricci's 1.80 earned run average (ERA) is the lowest among this list's pitchers; one position player, second baseman Cookie Rojas, has a 0.00 ERA in his only pitching appearance.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (T–V)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 58 have had surnames beginning with the letter T, 6 have had names beginning with U, and 24 have had surnames beginning with the letter V. One player, Sam Thompson, has been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame; he played ten seasons (1889–1898) for Philadelphia and set the franchise's record for most triples in a single season in 1894. The Hall of Fame lists the Phillies as Thompson's primary team, and he is a member of the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame, as are second baseman Tony Taylor; Elmer Valo, who was inducted for his contributions as a member of the crosstown Philadelphia Athletics; and John Vukovich, who was primarily a third baseman during his playing days with the Phillies and was inducted for his years of service to the Phillies. In addition to three tenures as a player (1970–1971, 1976–1977, 1979–1981), Vukovich was a coach and team advisor from 1983 to 2004.Among the 54 batters in this list, Tuck Turner has the best batting average; he batted .380 in four seasons with Philadelphia. Other players with an average above .300 include Thompson (.334 in ten seasons), Cotton Tierney (.317 in one season), and Andy Tracy (.357 in two seasons). Chase Utley leads all players on this list with 188 home runs, and Thompson's 963 runs batted in are best. In home runs, Jim Thome and Shane Victorino lead all players with surnames starting with T and V, with 96 and 79, respectively; in runs batted in, the U and V leaders are Utley (694) and Victorino (350).Of this list's 34 pitchers, Bobby Thigpen has the best win–loss record, in terms of winning percentage; he won three games and lost one for a win ratio of .750 in his only season with Philadelphia. Jack Taylor leads this list with 96 victories and 77 defeats, and Wayne Twitchell has the most strikeouts, with 573. Erskine Thomason's 0.00 earned run average (ERA) is the lowest mark on this list; among pitchers who have allowed an earned run, Kent Tekulve, who holds the franchise's single-season record for appearances by a pitcher, has the best mark, with a 3.01 ERA. Among pitchers whose surnames begin with U, Tom Underwood has the best win–loss record, in terms of winning percentage; he won 28 games and lost 20 for a win ratio of .583 in his four seasons with Philadelphia. Underwood's 28 victories are the best among pitchers on this list whose names begin with U; Tom Vickery shares the mark among V-named pitchers. Dutch Ulrich has the most defeats among pitchers whose surnames start with U, with 27 in three seasons. Underwood has 245 strikeouts, best among the U-named pitchers; Vickery leads pitchers whose surnames begin with V in that category, with 177. Al Verdel has the best earned run average (ERA) among pitchers whose surnames start with V; he allowed no runs in his only career appearance for an ERA of 0.00. Ulrich's 3.48 ERA leads the pitchers whose surnames begin with U.

Rube Walberg

George Elvin Walberg (July 27, 1896 – October 27, 1978) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1923 through 1937 for the New York Giants (1923), Philadelphia Athletics (1923–1933) and Boston Red Sox (1934–1937). Walberg batted and threw left-handed. He was born in Pine City, Minnesota.

In a 15-season career, Walberg posted a 155–141 record with 1085 strikeouts and a 4.16 ERA in 2644 innings, including 15 shutouts and 140 complete games.

A consistent and durable pitcher, Walberg averaged 16 wins for the Philadelphia Athletics of Connie Mack from 1926 to 1932, with career-highs of 20 wins in 1931 and 18 in 1929. He also had a 1–1 mark with a 1.93 ERA for the Athletics in five World Series appearances. A good-hitting pitcher, Walberg collected a .179 batting average with four home runs and 84 runs batted in. When Mack dismantled the Athletics in 1933, he was sent along with Lefty Grove and Max Bishop to the Boston Red Sox in exchange for two players and $150.000. He was a spot starter and reliever with Boston during three seasons and pitched his last game at the age of forty-one.

Walberg surrendered 17 home runs to Babe Ruth, more than did any other pitcher.

Walberg died in Tempe, Arizona at age 82. In 2002, he was inducted into the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame.

Sam Chapman

Samuel Blake Chapman (April 11, 1916 – December 22, 2006) was an American two-sport athletic star who played as a center fielder in Major League Baseball, spending nearly his entire career with the Philadelphia Athletics (1938–1941, 1945–1951). He batted and threw right-handed, leading the American League in putouts four times. He was previously an All-American college football player at the University of California.

Todd Kalas

Todd Harry Kalas (born December 31, 1965) is an American television broadcaster for the Houston Astros. He is the oldest son of the late longtime Philadelphia Phillies Hall of Fame and Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame broadcaster Harry Kalas.

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