Phil Bengtson

John Phillip Bengtson (July 17, 1913 – December 18, 1994) was an American football player and coach. He was a longtime assistant coach in college football and the National Football League (NFL), chiefly remembered as the successor to Vince Lombardi as head coach of the Green Bay Packers in 1968.

Phil Bengtson
Personal information
Born:July 17, 1913
Roseau, Minnesota
Died:December 18, 1994 (aged 81)
San Diego, California
Career information
College:Minnesota
Career history
As coach:

Career

Bengtson was a native of Roseau, Minnesota, and played tackle under Bernie Bierman at the University of Minnesota during the 1930s. In 1934, he earned All-America honors with the Golden Gophers, working in tandem with a player who went to coaching immortality: quarterback Bud Wilkinson.

Bengtson took his first assistant coaching job at the University of Missouri in 1935, but soon returned to his alma mater as line coach, staying through the 1939 season. Beginning in 1940, he moved to Stanford University, where he served as an assistant coach for 12 years. Bengtson moved to the professional level in 1952 with the nearby San Francisco 49ers.

In seven seasons with the Niners, Bengtson served under three head coaches: (Buck Shaw, Red Strader, Frankie Albert) before being dismissed with Albert after the 1958 season. Soon after, he was one of the first four assistants hired in Lombardi's first week with the Packers in early February 1959.

Bengtson was the only assistant coach to stay for the entire nine-year tenure of Lombardi (1959–1967). His work as defensive coordinator of the Packers established his coaching ability and put him in line to succeed Lombardi. From 1961 to 1967, the Packers captured five NFL titles, and the first two Super Bowls.

Bengtson replaced Lombardi following the 1967 season; his low-key approach was in sharp contrast to the often-volatile Lombardi. With the aging of key players, this translated into mediocrity for the franchise. Bengtson's Packers were 20–21–1 in his three seasons as head coach. After a 6–8 record in 1970, he was relieved of his duties, replaced by Missouri head coach Dan Devine for the 1971 season. Devine lasted four seasons with the Packers, moving back to the collegiate level at the University of Notre Dame following the 1974 season. Lombardi's former quarterback, Bart Starr, became the head coach of the Packers in 1975.

Bengtson resurfaced with the San Diego Chargers and New England Patriots, becoming the interim head coach of the Patriots in late 1972. Later, he was named the team's Director of Pro Scouting, staying through the 1974 season.

Bengtson died at age 81 after a long illness at his home in San Diego on December 18, 1994.

1934 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1934 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams chosen by various selectors for the 1934 Big Ten Conference football season.

1969 Green Bay Packers season

The 1969 Green Bay Packers season was their 51st season overall and their 49th season in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–6 record under coach Phil Bengtson, earning them a 3rd-place finish in the Central division.

1970 Green Bay Packers season

The 1970 Green Bay Packers season was their 52nd season overall and their 50th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–8 record earning them a third consecutive third-place finish in the four-team NFC Central division. It was the third and final season for Phil Bengtson as head coach; he resigned shortly after the season ended.

Bengtsson

Bengtsson is Swedish surname originating in a patronymic, meaning "son of Bengt", Bengt meaning "Blessed". The name is sometimes written Bengtson (a form frequently adopted by migrants to the United States). Other forms occur, such as Bengtzon, Bankson, Bankston, Benson or Benktsson.

Bengtsson is the 15th most common surname in Sweden.

Notable people with the surname include:

Anders Bengtsson, Swedish politician and member of parliament

Angelica Bengtsson (born 1993), Swedish pole vaulter

Bengt Bengtsson, Swedish gymnast

Bengt-Åke Bengtsson (born 1938), Swedish rower

Birgitta Bengtsson (born 1965), Swedish sailor

Björn Bengtsson (born 1973), Swedish actor

Catrine Bengtsson, Swedish badminton player

Christopher Bengtsson (born 1993), Swedish professional ice hockey player

Emma Bengtsson, Swedish chef

Erik G. Bengtsson (born 1928), Swedish Army lieutenant general

Erling Blöndal Bengtsson (1932–2013), Danish cellist

Frans G. Bengtsson, Swedish author

Gabriel Bengtsson, Swedish judoka

Göran Bengtsson, Swedish handball player

Gösta Bengtsson, Swedish sailor

Gunder Bengtsson, Swedish football coach

Håkan Bengtsson (born 1942), Swedish swimmer

Ingemund Bengtsson, Swedish politician and Speaker of the Riksdag 1979–1988.

Jan-Olof Bengtsson, Swedish journalist

Johan Bengtsson, Swedish bassist

Kristin Bengtsson, Swedish female footballer

Lennart Bengtsson, Swedish meteorologist

Margot Bengtsson, Swedish psychologist and feminist scholar

Maria Bengtsson (badminton), Swedish badminton player

Maria Bengtsson (soprano) (born 1975)

Martin Bengtsson, Swedish heavy metal musician

Mikael Bengtsson, Swedish footballer

Per Bengtsson, Swedish speed skater

Per-Inge Bengtsson, Swedish sprint canoer

Pierre Bengtsson, Swedish footballer

Rasmus Bengtsson, Swedish footballer

Robin Bengtsson, Swedish singer

Rolf-Göran Bengtsson, Swedish horse rider and Swedish Silver Medalist in Individual Jumping at the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games

Stellan Bengtsson, Swedish table tennis player

Sylve Bengtsson, Swedish footballer

Thomas Bengtsson, Swedish magician better known under his stage name Tom Stone.Similar spellings

Jerry Bengtson (born 1987), Honduran footballer

John Bengtson, U.S. linguist

Phil Bengtson, U.S. American football playerBengtsson as a middle name

Jöns Bengtsson Oxenstierna, 15th Century Swedish archbishop

Bob Monnett

Robert C. Monnett (February 27, 1910 – August 2, 1978) was a professional American football player who played halfback for six seasons for the Green Bay Packers. He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973.

Charley Brock

Charles Jacob "Charley" Brock (March 15, 1916 – May 25, 1987) was an American football center and linebacker.

Dan Devine

Daniel John Devine (December 22, 1924 – May 9, 2002) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Arizona State University from 1955 to 1957, the University of Missouri from 1958 to 1970, and the University of Notre Dame from 1975 to 1980, compiling a career college football mark of 173–56–9. Devine was also the head coach of the National Football League's Green Bay Packers from 1971 to 1974, tallying a mark of 25–27–4. His 1977 Notre Dame team won a national championship after beating Texas in the Cotton Bowl. Devine was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1985.

Gerry Ellis

Gerry Ellis (born November 12, 1957

in Columbia, Missouri) is a former professional American football player who played running back for seven seasons for the Green Bay Packers.

Hank Bruder

Henry George "Hank" Bruder Jr. (November 22, 1907 – June 29, 1970) was an American football player in the National Football League. He played nine years with the Green Bay Packers from 1931 to 1939 and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1972. Bruder attended Northwestern University, where he was a member of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity.He was part of the offensive line that blocked for Pro Football Hall of Fame back Johnny "Blood" McNally.

Hank Gremminger

Charles Henry "Hank" Gremminger (September 1, 1933 – November 2, 2001) was an American football player, a defensive back in the National Football League for eleven seasons. He played ten seasons for the Green Bay Packers (1956–1965) and one for the Los Angeles Rams in 1966.

John Mazur

John Edward Mazur (June 17, 1930 – November 1, 2013) was an American football player and coach. He was a quarterback for the University of Notre Dame and also served as head coach for the New England Patriots from 1970 to 1972.

List of Green Bay Packers head coaches

There have been 15 head coaches for the Green Bay Packers, a professional American football team of the National Football League (NFL). The franchise was founded in 1919 by Curly Lambeau and competed for two years against teams around Wisconsin and Michigan before entering into the American Professional Football Association, which is now known as the NFL.

Four different coaches have won NFL championships with the Packers: Earl Louis "Curly" Lambeau in 1929, 1930, 1931, 1936, 1939, and 1944; Vince Lombardi in 1961, 1962, 1965, 1966, and 1967; Mike Holmgren in 1996; and Mike McCarthy in 2010. Lambeau is the franchise leader in career games (334) and career wins (209), while Lombardi has the best winning percentage (.754). Ray (Scooter) McLean has the worst winning percentage (.077). Four Packers coaches—Lambeau, Lombardi, Bart Starr and Forrest Gregg—have been elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, although Starr and Gregg are recognized as players. Lombardi and Lindy Infante have both been named the league's coach of the year by major news organizations.

As of January 2019, the head coach of the Green Bay Packers is Matt LaFleur, who was named to that position after Mike McCarthy was fired during the 2018 NFL season.

List of New England Patriots head coaches

The New England Patriots are a professional American football team based in Foxborough, Massachusetts. They are a member of the East Division of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The team began as the Boston Patriots in the American Football League, a league which merged with the National Football League before the 1970 season.There have been 14 head coaches for the Patriots franchise. Lou Saban became the first coach of the Patriots in 1960, although he was fired part way through their second season. Bill Belichick, the current coach since 2000, has led the team for more regular season games (288), post-season games (37) and more complete seasons (18) than any other head coach. His 214 wins with the Patriots are far and away the most in franchise history, more than three times those of runner-up Mike Holovak. Belichick has also led the team to eight of their ten Super Bowl appearances, winning five of them. Holovak, Raymond Berry and Bill Parcells all led the Patriots to league championship games, with only one coach failing to reach the Super Bowl. Five Patriots head coaches, Holovak, Chuck Fairbanks, Berry, Parcells, and Belichick, have been named coach of the year by at least one major news organization. Additionally, Raymond Berry is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, having been inducted in 1973, eleven years before he became the Patriots' head coach.Twice in Patriots history there were "interim" head coaches. In 1972, John Mazur resigned with five games left in the season. Phil Bengston was named as the interim head coach for the rest of the season, during which he only won one game, and he was not made the permanent coach the next year. In 1978, head coach Fairbanks secretly made a deal to leave the team to coach the University of Colorado Buffaloes while he was still coaching Patriots. Team owner Billy Sullivan suspended Fairbanks for the final game of the regular season, stating "You cannot serve two masters," and Ron Erhardt and Hank Bullough took co-head coaching responsibilities for that game. Fairbanks was reinstated when the team qualified for the playoffs, and he lost the first playoff game, his last for the Patriots.

Marv Fleming

Marvin Lawrence Fleming (born January 2, 1942) is a former professional American football player, a tight end in the National Football League for twelve seasons, seven with the Green Bay Packers and five with the Miami Dolphins. He was a member of five NFL championship teams.

Fleming is the first player in NFL history to play in five Super Bowls—with Green Bay (I, II) and Miami (VI, VII, VIII). He played under hall of fame head coaches Vince Lombardi and Don Shula for five seasons each.

Mike Douglass (American football)

Michael Reese Douglass (born March 15, 1955 in St. Louis, Missouri) is a former American football player. He played outside linebacker for the Green Bay Packers (1978–1985) and the San Diego Chargers (1986) in the National Football League. He ranks third in the lists of tackles made by a Packers player.

Rich Moore (American football)

Richard Clifton "Rich" Moore (born April 26, 1947 in Cleveland, Ohio) is a former American football defensive tackle in the National Football League who played 20 games for the Green Bay Packers. In 1969, the Green Bay Packers used the 12th pick in the 1st round of the 1969 NFL Draft to sign Moore out of Villanova University. He had previously been named as a first team tackle on the East Coast Athletic Conference all-conference team in 1968, his senior season at Villanova. Moore went on to play for two seasons with the Packers. He tore an Achilles tendon in a win over the Philadelphia Eagles in the 1970 season, and had surgery shortly thereafter, putting him out for the season. After trying him on offense during training camp in 1971, the Packers traded him to the New England Patriots for linebacker John Bramlett in late July 1971. However, Moore was unable to play for the Patriots in 1971 due to injury. He was then released by the Patriots in June 1972.Moore's only known statistic is a single fumble recovery in the 1969 season. His son, Brandon Moore, later played offensive tackle for the New England Patriots from 1993 through 1995.

Ron Wolf

Ron Wolf (born December 30, 1938) is the former American football general manager (GM) of the National Football League's Green Bay Packers. Wolf is widely credited with bringing success to a Packers franchise that had rarely won during the two decades prior to Wolf joining the organization. He also played a significant role in personnel operations with the Oakland and Los Angeles Raiders from 1963 to 1975 and again from 1978 to 1990. He joined Green Bay's front office in November 1991 from a personnel director's job with the New York Jets. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in August 2015.

Verne Lewellen

Verne Clark Lewellen (September 29, 1901 – April 16, 1980) was an American football player and executive.

A four-sport high school athlete, Lewellen stayed in Lincoln to attend Nebraska University, where he captained and quarterbacked the Cornhuskers to a 14-7 defeat of a Notre Dame squad in 1923. Also a pitcher, the Pittsburgh Pirates were ready to sign him until an injury from a train wreck affected his pitching arm. Jim Crowley - who played against Lewellen in the 1923 Nebraska-Notre Dame matchup - recommended Lewellen to Packer coach Curly Lambeau.He played most of his nine-year career with the Green Bay Packers. Lewellen played in 102 games for the Packers from 1924 to 1932 (in 1927, the team "lent" him to the New York Yankees for three end-of-season games) and earned all-league first team honors from 1926-29. Completing a law degree from Nebraska University during his professional football career, he ran successfully for Brown County (WI) District Attorney in 1928 against Packer teammate LaVern Dilweg and was re-elected in 1930. He lost the seat in the 1932 election and practiced law until his retirement.In 1950, he joined the Packers as a member of the executive committee, served as the Packers' general manager from 1954 through 1958 and business manager from 1961 to 1967.He was elected to the Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame in 1967 and the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1970.

The Professional Football Researchers Association named Lewellen to the PRFA Hall of Very Good Class of 2009

Whitey Woodin

Howard Lee "Whitey" Woodin (January 29, 1894 – February 7, 1974) was an American football player. He played with the Racine Legion and the Green Bay Packers and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973. After retiring from football, Woodin remained in Green Bay and worked for many years at Falls Power and Paper Company.

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