Peter Hebblethwaite

Peter Hebblethwaite (30 September 1930 – 18 December 1994) was a British Jesuit priest and writer. After leaving the priesthood, he became an editor, journalist ('Vaticanologist') and biographer.

Peter Hebblethwaite
Born30 September 1930
Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire, England, UK
Died18 December 1994 (aged 64)
Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, UK
Other namesRobert Myddleton (in The Tablet)
EducationXaverian College; Jesuit novitiate
Alma materXaverian College
OccupationJesuit priest, editor, journalist
Notable credit(s)
The Month, The Tablet, The Observer, National Catholic Reporter
Spouse(s)
Margaret Speaight (m. 1974)

Life

Hebblethwaite was born in Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire, the son of Charles and Elsie Ann Hebblethwaite. He was educated by the De La Salle Brothers.[1] He was a journalist on Vatican affairs (regarded by some during his lifetime as the leading English-language Vaticanologist) and for some years he was a Jesuit priest. He was educated at the parish primary school of St Anne's, Ashton-under-Lyne, and Xaverian College, Manchester, a Catholic grammar school.[2]

He entered the Jesuit novitiate in 1948, and later studied in England and France. He was ordained a priest in 1963. Two years later he joined the staff of the Jesuit magazine The Month, covering the final session of the Second Vatican Council. In 1967 he was appointed editor of The Month, a post he held until leaving the priesthood to marry Margaret Speaight (born 1951, London), a British writer, journalist, activist and religious worker. The couple wed in 1974 and had three children.[1]

From 1976 to 1979, he taught French at Wadham College, Oxford, specialising in the work of Catholic writer Georges Bernanos, before launching himself as a freelance journalist, concentrating on Catholic affairs and the Vatican in particular. He was the Vatican correspondent for the American liberal Catholic weekly National Catholic Reporter from 1979 to 1981. His numerous books brought him to a wider public. The Runaway Church (1975) looked at the changes in the Catholic Church since the Second Vatican Council. The Year of Three Popes covered the dramatic papal events of 1978, and was later followed by two papal biographies: John XXIII: Pope of the Council appeared in 1984 and Paul VI: The First Modern Pope in 1993.[1]

Death

Peter Hebblethwaite died in Oxford on 18 December 1994, aged 64.

Publications

Books

  • Bernanos: An introduction (Studies in modern European literature and thought series) (1965)
  • Understanding the Synod. Dublin and Sydney: Gill & Son, 1968.
  • The Runaway Church. London: Collins, 1975. ISBN 0-00-211648-0
  • The Christian-Marxist Dialogue: beginnings, present status, and beyond. London: Darton, Longman and Todd, 1977. ISBN 0-232-51390-2
  • The Year of Three Popes. London: Collins, 1978. ISBN 0-00-215047-6
  • with Ludwig Kaufmann, John Paul II: A Pictorial Biography. New York: McGraw-Hill, c1979. ISBN 0-07-033327-0 (hbk.), ISBN 0-07-033328-9 (pbk.)
  • The New Inquisition? Schillebeeckx and Küng. London: Fount Paperbacks, 1980. ISBN 0-00-626106-X
  • The Papal Year. London: Chapman, 1981. ISBN 0-225-66297-3
  • Introducing John Paul II: The Populist Pope. London: Collins / Fount, 1982. ISBN 0-00-626346-1
  • John XXIII: Pope of the Council. London: Chapman, 1984. ISBN 0-225-66419-4 Revised edition Fount Paperbacks, 1994. Abridged edition Continuum, 2000.
  • Synod Extraordinary: The Inside Story of the Rome Synod November–December 1985. London: Darton, Longman and Todd, 1986. ISBN 0-232-51665-0
  • In the Vatican. London: Sidgwick & Jackson, 1986. ISBN 0-283-99324-3
  • Paul VI: The First Modern Pope. London: HarperCollins, 1993. ISBN 0-00-215658-X
  • The Next Pope: An Enquiry. London: Fount, 1995. ISBN 0-00-627831-0 (reissued in 2000 with the subtitle "A Behind-The-Scenes Look at the Forces That Will Choose the Successor to John Paul II and Decide the Future of the Catholic Church". ISBN 0-00-628160-5)

Pamphlets

  • Changes in the Church?. London: Catholic Truth Society, 1967.
  • What the Council Says about Cultural Values. London: Catholic Truth Society, 1968.
  • The Theology of the Church. Theology Today no. 8. Notre Dame, Ind.: Fides Publishers, 1969.
  • Some Aspects of Revisionist Thinking. Boston College Studies in Philosophy 2. Boston: Boston College, 1969.
  • Pope John Paul II, the Gulf War and the Catholic tradition. Oxford Project for Peace Studies paper no.31. Oxford: Oxford Project for Peace Studies, 1992. ISBN 1-871191-31-9
  • Damen Hebblethwaite, born 2 March 1998 is the great-great grandson of Peters father "Charles"

Translations

  • Ladislaus Boros, Breaking Through to God: The Way of the Cross. London: Darton, Longman and Todd, 1973. (from German) ISBN 0-232-51222-1
  • Pierre de Calan, Cosmas, or, The Love of God. London: Collins, 1980. (from French) ISBN 0-00-222118-7

References

  1. ^ a b c "Peter Hebblethwaite" (obit), The Independent, 19 December 1994
  2. ^ Michael J. Walsh, "Hebblethwaite, Peter (1930–1994)," in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. Online edition. Retrieved 4 January 2008

Obituaries

  • The Times, 19 December 1994.
  • The Guardian, 19 December 1994.
  • The Daily Telegraph, 19 December 1994.
Brigate Fiamme Verdi

The Brigate Fiamme Verdi (Green Flame Brigade) was an Italian Partisan Resistance Group, of predominantly Roman Catholic orientation, which operated in Italy during World War II.The armed Italian Resistance comprised a number of contingents of differing ideological orientation - the largest being the Communist Brigate Garibaldi. Tensions between Catholics and anarchists, Communists and socialists in the movement led Catholics to form the Fiamme Verdi as a separate brigade of Christian Democrats in Northern Italy. Peter Hebblethwaite wrote that, by early 1944, some 20,000 partisans had emerged from Catholic Action. Known as the "Green Flames", they were supported by sympathetic provincial clergy in the North, who pronounced the Germans to be "unjust invaders", whom it was lawful and meritorious to repel. "Bishops tended to be more cautious", wrote Hebblethwaite, Maurilio Fossati, the Cardinal Archbishop of Turin "visited partisan units in the mountains, heard their confessions and said Mass for them."The Fiamme Verdi did not belong to the approximately 4% of Italian Resistance groups that were formal Catholic organisations, but instead was classed in the 21% of resistance groups that were "independent", in which, like the Osoppo group and others, the Fiamme Verdi was not formally a Catholic group, but had a very strong Catholic presence. Nevertheless, just as there were militant Catholics within the Garibaldi Brigade, so there were non-Catholics within the Fiamme Verdi. 191 priests were killed by fascists and 125 by the Germans, while 109 were killed by partisans. Though some priests joined pro-fascist bands, the Vatican backed the so-called anti-Fascist 'partisan chaplains' and 'red priests' fighting with the partisans, hoping that they would provide religious guidance to partisans being exposed to Communist propaganda.The Fiamme Verdi was sometimes associated with the Democrazia Cristiana Party and was particularly active in Emilia and Lombardia. Notable members included Lionello Levi Sandri, who later served as a prominent Italian and European Commissioner.

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Emmanuel Célestin Suhard (French pronunciation: ​[emanɥɛl selɛstɛ̃ sɥaʁ]; April 5, 1874 – May 30, 1949) was a French Cardinal of the Catholic Church. He served as Archbishop of Paris from 1940 until his death, and was elevated to the cardinalate in 1935. He was instrumental in the founding of the Mission of France and the Worker-Priest Movement, to bring the clergy closer to the people.

Enrico Dante

Enrico Dante (5 July 1884 – 24 April 1967) was an Italian Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. He served as Papal Master of Ceremonies from 1947 until his death, and was elevated to the cardinalate in 1965.

His face became very familiar after assisting the popes at their Masses and other ceremonies for nearly twenty years.

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Hebblethwaite

Hebblethwaite may refer to :

James Hebblethwaite (22 September 1857 – 13 September 1921) was an English-born Australian poet, teacher and clergyman.

Peter Hebblethwaite (September 30, 1930, Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire - December 18, 1994, Oxford), was a British journalist and biographer.

Humanae vitae

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Margaret Hebblethwaite

Margaret Isabella Mary Speaight Hebblethwaite (born 16 June 1951, London) is a British writer, journalist, activist and religious worker.

Maurilio Fossati

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Riccardo Galeazzi-Lisi

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A journalists or scholar focusing on this area of expertise is sometimes referred to as a Vaticanologist or Vaticanist.

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