Pete Van Wieren

Pete Van Wieren (October 7, 1944 – August 2, 2014), a native of Rochester, New York, was an American sportscaster best known for his long career calling play-by-play for Major League Baseball's Atlanta Braves.

Pete Van Wieren
Skip Caray and Pete van Wieren 1983
Skip Caray (left) and Pete Van Wieren acknowledging fans at a Braves game in 1983.
BornOctober 7, 1944
DiedAugust 2, 2014 (aged 69)
Atlanta, Georgia, United States
Alma materCornell University
OccupationSportscaster

Broadcasting career

Atlanta Braves

From 1976 to 2008, he called the team's television and/or radio broadcasts, teaming with a number of on-air partners including Ernie Johnson, Don Sutton and Skip Caray (who was hired by the club at the same time as himself).[1] Johnson originally nicknamed Van Wieren "The Professor" because Van Wieren looked like pitcher Jim Brosnan.[2] The moniker stuck for his in-depth knowledge of the game and thorough preparation before broadcasts.[3][4]

According to Van Wieren himself, on the September 17, 2007, Atlanta Braves Radio Network broadcast, he worked for the Washington Post in the 1960s. He did not say what his position was at the paper, only that he met Shirley Povich while he was there.

Along with Caray, Van Wieren was inducted into the Atlanta Braves Hall of Fame in 2004,[5] joining an impressive list in Braves history that already included Hank Aaron, Lew Burdette, Del Crandall, Tommy Holmes, Ernie Johnson, Eddie Mathews, Phil Niekro, Dale Murphy, Kid Nichols, Ted Turner, Johnny Sain and Warren Spahn.

On December 18, 2006, the Braves announced that Van Wieren had signed a three-year contract to continue doing Braves broadcasts on the radio.[6]

Non-Atlanta Braves assignments

An eight-time winner of the Georgia Sportscaster of the Year award from the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association, Van Wieren broadcast a number of sports in addition to Braves baseball. After joining TBS Sports in 1975, he covered Atlanta Hawks basketball, Atlanta Flames hockey, Big Ten Conference college football, Atlanta Falcons pre-season football, and NBA games on TBS and TNT. He has also served as a sports reporter for CNN.[7]

In 1995, Van Wieren alongside Larry Dierker called Games 1–3 of the National League Division Series between the Atlanta Braves and Colorado Rockies for The Baseball Network. The first two games were broadcast on NBC while Game 3 was on ABC.

Retirement and death

On October 21, 2008, Van Wieren unexpectedly announced his retirement from broadcasting effective immediately, after 33 seasons with the Braves.[2] His departure came less than three months after the death of his longtime on-air partner Skip Caray. The broadcast booth for the Braves' home games at Turner Field is named for Van Wieren.

Van Wieren co-wrote a book titled Of Mikes and Men: A Lifetime of Braves Baseball with Jack Wilkinson. It was released in April 2010.[8]

On November 4, 2009, Van Wieren was diagnosed with cutaneous B-cell lymphoma.[9] He suffered a relapse and additional rounds of chemotherapy after a recurrence in the fall of 2010.[10] On August 2, 2014, Van Wieren died from complications of lymphoma.[5] He was married to Elaine Van Wieren, with whom he had two children, from 1964 until his death.[11]

References

  1. ^ Bowman, Mark (October 21, 2008). "Van Wieren surprises with retirement". MLB.com. Retrieved August 3, 2014.
  2. ^ a b "Van Wieren retires after 33 years with Braves". ESPN.com. Associated Press. October 21, 2008. Retrieved August 3, 2014.
  3. ^ O'Brien, David (August 2, 2014). "Braves broadcaster Van Wieren dies after bout with cancer". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved August 3, 2014.
  4. ^ Bowman, Mark (August 2, 2014). "Van Wieren, longtime Braves broadcaster, dies". MLB.com. Retrieved August 3, 2014.
  5. ^ a b "Longtime Braves broadcaster Van Wieren dies at 69". ESPN.com. Associated Press. August 2, 2014. Retrieved August 3, 2014.
  6. ^ Tucker, Tim (December 16, 2006). "TBS tuning out Skip and Pete". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Archived from the original on December 27, 2006.
  7. ^ "Braves Hall of Fame member Pete Van Wieren announces his retirement". MLB.com. October 21, 2008. Retrieved August 3, 2014.
  8. ^ "Pete Van Wieren, longtime Braves broadcaster, passes away". WXIA-TV. August 2, 2014. Archived from the original on August 2, 2014.
  9. ^ Bowmam, Mark (November 21, 2012). "Van Wieren thankful for good health after cancer battle". MLB.com. Retrieved August 3, 2014.
  10. ^ Bowman, Mark. "Cancer Resurfaces for Van Wieren". MLB.com. Retrieved October 27, 2010.
  11. ^ Stephenson, Creg (August 2, 2014). "Longtime Braves broadcaster Pete Van Wieren dead at 69 after battle with cancer". Huntsville Times. Retrieved July 14, 2016.

External links

1979 Independence Bowl

The 1979 Independence Bowl was a college football postseason bowl game between the McNeese State Cowboys and the Syracuse Orangemen.

1990 Atlanta Braves season

The 1990 Atlanta Braves season was the team's 25th season in Atlanta, the 115th in franchise history as a member of the National League and the 120th season overall. The Braves went 65–97, en route to their sixth-place finish in the NL West, 26 games behind the World Champion Cincinnati Reds, and ending up with the worst record that year. On June 23, Bobby Cox replaced Russ Nixon as the team's manager, a job Cox would hold for the next two decades.

1994 Atlanta Braves season

The 1994 Atlanta Braves season was the Braves' 124th in existence and their 29th in Atlanta. After trading the two-sport athlete Deion Sanders, experts predicted that the Atlanta Braves were going to have their worst season since 1935. The Braves' records reflect just how successful that year was, although it was curtailed due to the 1994–95 Major League Baseball strike. The Braves played a total of 114 games; they won 68 and lost 46. The Braves finished their 1994 season with a winning percentage .596, ranking the Braves 2nd overall in the MLB, although they were six games behind the Montreal Expos in the NL East.

1997 Atlanta Braves season

The 1997 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 32nd season in Atlanta and 127th overall. The Braves won their sixth consecutive division title, taking the National League East title by 9 games over the second place Florida Marlins. However, the Marlins would later defeat the Braves in the 1997 National League Championship Series. 1997 was the first year that the Braves played their home games in Turner Field, which originally served as a venue for the 1996 Summer Olympics.

1999 Atlanta Braves season

The 1999 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 34th season in Atlanta and 129th overall. The Braves won their eighth consecutive division title with a 103-59 record and 6 game lead over the New York Mets. The Braves appeared in the World Series for the fifth time during the 1990s. The Braves lost all four games of the 1999 World Series to the New York Yankees, resulting in a sweep. The Braves played their 2nd World Series against the Yankees in 4 years, with the first being in 1996, which they played in six games. This is to date their last National League pennant.

Two key players on the 1999 Braves were Chipper Jones & John Rocker. Jones won the National League's Most Valuable Player award with a .310 average, 45 HRs, 110 RBIs, and sealed the award with his September heroics against the New York Mets. Rocker recorded 38 saves as Atlanta's closer, but later created controversy due to his racist and homophobic comments in a December 27, 1999, Sports Illustrated article.

2000 Atlanta Braves season

The 2000 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 35th season in Atlanta along with the 125th season in the National League and 130th overall. The Braves won their ninth consecutive division title, however, the 2000 season would mark the first time since 1990 that the Braves did not appear in the National League Championship Series. One of the highlights of the season was that the All-Star Game was held at Turner Field in Atlanta.

2004 Atlanta Braves season

The 2004 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 39th season in Atlanta and 134th overall. The Braves won their 13th consecutive division title under Manager of the Year Bobby Cox, finishing 10 games ahead of the second-place Philadelphia Phillies. The Braves lost the 2004 Divisional Series to the Houston Astros, 3 games to 2.

J. D. Drew replaced Gary Sheffield (lost to the Yankees in free agency) in the outfield, free agent John Thomson joined the rotation, and rookies Adam LaRoche and Charles Thomas saw significant playing time on a younger 2004 Braves team.

2006 Atlanta Braves season

The 2006 Atlanta Braves season was the Braves' 136th for the franchise and 41st in Atlanta. During the season, the Braves attempted to win the NL East.

Finishing with a 79–83 record, not only did the Braves miss the playoffs for the first time since 1990 (not counting the strike-affected 1994 season), but also their first losing season and worst record since that year. In failing to reach the postseason, Atlanta ended their streak of consecutive NL East titles.

2008 Atlanta Braves season

The 2008 Atlanta Braves season was the 43rd in Atlanta and the 138th overall. The Braves attempted to reclaim a postseason berth for the first time since 2005. They were once again skippered by Bobby Cox, now in his 19th season (of his second stint) managing Atlanta. As a result of John Schuerholz taking the position of team president, the Braves entered the offseason with Frank Wren as their general manager.

The team wore a patch on the right sleeve "BEACH" in honor of former Braves player and bench coach Jim Beauchamp, who had died after the previous season ended. 2008 saw the departure of two of the team's longtime radio and television announcers. Skip Caray died on August 3, while Pete van Wieren announced his retirement on October 21. Both men had been broadcasting for the team since 1976.

Atlanta Braves Radio Network

The Atlanta Braves Radio Network is a 138-station network (97 A.M., 41 F.M. stations + 1 F.M. translator) heard across 10 states and one territory of the Southeastern United States that airs Major League Baseball games of the Atlanta Braves. The flagship stations are WCNN and WNNX in Atlanta, Georgia. The main announcers are Jim Powell and Joe Simpson, who alternate between play-by-play and color commentary on each broadcast. Ben Ingram serves as the pregame host and frequently fills in on commentary, along with longtime commentator Don Sutton. Grant McAuley is the postgame host, while Kevin McAlpin serves as a dugout reporter. Mark Lemke provides pregame/postgame analysis and occasionally fills in for Sutton on game broadcasts. Former known long-time announcers include Pete Van Wieren, Ernie Johnson, Sr. and Skip Caray, all deceased. The engineer and game producer for Braves Network broadcasts is Jonathan Chadwick. Network Producers include Kevin D'Amico, Chris Culwell, Sean Nerny, Brandon Joseph, John Radcliffe, Cameron Carruth and Isiah Stewart.Due to the large geographic span of the Braves' territory, their radio network has the most affiliates of any team in Major League Baseball. The nearest teams to the north of Atlanta are the Cincinnati Reds, Washington Nationals and the Baltimore Orioles. The nearest teams to the west are the St. Louis Cardinals, Houston Astros and Texas Rangers, while the nearest teams to the south are the Tampa Bay Rays and Miami Marlins.

Braves TBS Baseball

Braves TBS Baseball (or Braves Baseball on TBS) was a presentation of regular season Major League Baseball game telecasts featuring the Atlanta Braves National League franchise that aired on the American cable and satellite network TBS. The games were produced by Turner Sports, the sports division of the Turner Broadcasting System subsidiary of Time Warner, TBS's corporate parent. The program, which made its debut in 1973, ended national broadcasts in 2007.

TBS phased out its national coverage of Braves baseball after it was awarded an MLB-wide national broadcast contract effective in 2008. WPCH-TV, the rebranded former originating signal of the TBS superstation feed, retained Atlanta-market rights to a partial schedule of Braves games through 2013, but primary rights moved to cable regional sports networks, eventually settling with Fox Sports South. TBS may select Braves games for national broadcast on equal grounds with other MLB clubs, but their national broadcast would be blacked out in the Braves' MLB-designated territory if the regional rights-holder carries the game as well.

Darrel Chaney

Darrel Lee Chaney (born March 9, 1948, in Hammond, Indiana) is an American former player/announcer in Major League Baseball who played for the Cincinnati Reds and Atlanta Braves from 1969 to 1979. In the early 1980s he worked for the Braves as an announcer along with Ernie Johnson, Skip Caray and Pete Van Wieren. He was on the Atlanta Braves Radio Network as well as WTBS-TV.

Chaney was a graduate of Morton High School in Hammond, Indiana, where he was a three-sport athlete and an All-American football player and was named the Northwest Indiana Times Athlete of the Year in 1966. His wife Cindy is also from Hammond and is a graduate of George Rogers Clark High School.He had several football scholarship offers from Big Ten schools but signed with Ball State University because there he could play both football and baseball. However, he was selected by the Reds in the second round of the 1966 draft and signed for a $6,000 bonus.Although a light-hitting infielder in the minor leagues, he broke through and led the Southern League with 23 home runs in 1968, earning him a spot on the Reds' roster in 1969, when he shared the shortstop position with Woody Woodward and Chico Ruiz. Chaney continued with the Reds in the 1970s but after the emergence of Dave Concepción was primarily a reserve.

He played in three World Series for the Reds' "Big Red Machine" teams, in 1970 and 1972 and on the World Series-winning team of 1975.Chaney was traded to Atlanta after the 1975 season and in 1976 batted .252 with one home run and 50 RBI as the Braves' regular shortstop. Over the next three seasons, however, he was unable to hold the job against competition from two other players, and was released at the end of the 1979 season.

In 915 career games, Chaney hit for a .217 batting average, with 14 home runs, 190 runs batted in, 237 runs scored, 458 hits, 75 doubles, 17 triples and 19 stolen bases.

Chaney is a past Chairman of the Board of the Major League Alumni Marketing (MLAM) and a Sr. Vice President of Sales and Marketing at a retail services organization. He is a Christian and a motivational speaker; Dan Hettinger has written a biography of Chaney entitled Welcome to the Big Leagues . . . Every Man's Journey to Significance. He lives in Sautee Nacoochee, Georgia with his wife Cindy.

List of Independence Bowl broadcasters

This is a list of Independence Bowl broadcasters. The Independence Bowl is a post-season NCAA-sanctioned Division I college football bowl game that is played annually at Independence Stadium in Shreveport, Louisiana.

List of National League Division Series broadcasters

The following is a list of the national television and radio networks and announcers who have broadcast the National League Division Series. It does not include any announcers who may have appeared on local radio broadcasts produced by the participating teams.

Skip Caray

Harry Christopher "Skip" Caray Jr. (August 12, 1939 – August 3, 2008) was an American sportscaster, best known for his long career as a radio and television play-by-play announcer for the Atlanta Braves of Major League Baseball. He was the son of baseball announcer Harry Caray, and the father of fellow Braves broadcaster Chip Caray; another son, Josh Caray, is a reporter for All News 106.7.

The Baseball Network

The Baseball Network was a short-lived television broadcasting joint venture between ABC, NBC and Major League Baseball. Under the arrangement, beginning in the 1994 season, the league produced its own in-house telecasts of games, which were then brokered to air on ABC and NBC. This was perhaps most evident by the copyright beds shown at the end of the telecasts, which stated "The proceeding program has been paid for by the office of The Commissioner of Baseball". The Baseball Network was the first television network in the United States to be owned by a professional sports league. In essence, The Baseball Network could be seen as a forerunner to the MLB Network, which would debut about 15 years later.

The package included coverage of games in primetime on selected nights throughout the regular season (under the branding Baseball Night in America), along with coverage of the postseason and the World Series. Unlike previous broadcasting arrangements with the league, there was no national "game of the week" during the regular season; these would be replaced by multiple weekly regional telecasts on certain nights of the week. Additionally, The Baseball Network had exclusive coverage windows; no other broadcaster could televise MLB games during the same night that The Baseball Network was televising games.

The arrangement did not last long; due to the effects of a players' strike on the remainder of the 1994 season, and poor reception from fans and critics over how the coverage was implemented, The Baseball Network would be disbanded after the 1995 season. While NBC would maintain rights to certain games, the growing Fox network (having established its own sports division two years earlier in 1994) became the league's new national broadcast partner beginning in 1996, with its then-parent company News Corporation eventually purchasing the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1998 (although the company has since sold the team).

The Baseball Network announcers

The following is a list of announcers who called Major League Baseball telecasts for the joint venture (lasting for the 1994-1995 seasons) between Major League Baseball, ABC and NBC called The Baseball Network announcers who represented each of the teams playing in the respective games were typically paired with each other on regular season Baseball Night in America telecasts. ABC used Al Michaels, Jim Palmer, Tim McCarver and Lesley Visser as the lead broadcasting team. Meanwhile, NBC used Bob Costas, Joe Morgan, Bob Uecker and Jim Gray as their lead broadcasting team.

Van Wieren

van Wieren is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Larry van Wieren (born 1951), Dutch ice hockey player

Pete Van Wieren (1944-2014), American sportscaster

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