Pete Schourek

Peter Alan Schourek (born May 10, 1969) is a former Major League Baseball left-handed pitcher who played for the New York Mets, Cincinnati Reds, Houston Astros, Boston Red Sox, and Pittsburgh Pirates from 1991 to 2001. He was the runnerup for the National League's Cy Young Award in 1995.

Schourek grew up in Falls Church, Virginia in the Washington Metropolitan Area and attended George C. Marshall High School in Falls Church (Fairfax County). While at Marshall the Statesmen finished as runners up in the Virginia High School League State Championship.

Schourek lives in the Northern Virginia area with his wife and daughter. He still displays his skills as a baseball player in semi-pro leagues in the area.

His best season came in 1995, as he posted an 18-7 record with a 3.22 ERA. He gave up 2 runs in 14​13 IP in the postseason (1.26 ERA), but took an 0-1 record in 2 starts behind an untimely offensive slump. He was the runner-up for the NL Cy Young Award, losing to Greg Maddux.

As Opening Day starter on April 1, 1996, he witnessed the death of umpire John McSherry, only seven pitches into the top of the 1st inning. He won the makeup game the next day, but struggled the rest of the way before his season ended due to injury in July with a 4-5 record and 6.01 ERA. He was consistently plagued by various injuries in subsequent seasons. This limited his effectiveness and moved around to various teams until his retirement after the 2001 season.

Schourek, along with Rodney "Crash" McCray, managed Team Crash Test Dummies to a title in Week 1 of the 2017 New York Mets Fantasy Camp. Schourek (along with Anthony Young), then managed Team PYT to a title in Week 2 of the 2017 New York Mets Fantasy Camp.

His father, Joe, is a respected teacher and successful baseball coach at Gonzaga College High School.

Pete Schourek
Pitcher
Born: May 10, 1969 (age 50)
Austin, Texas
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 9, 1991, for the New York Mets
Last MLB appearance
July 25, 2001, for the Boston Red Sox
MLB statistics
Win–loss record66–77
Earned run average4.59
Strikeouts813
Teams

External links

1991 New York Mets season

The 1991 New York Mets season was the 30th regular season for the Mets. They went 77-84 and finished fifth in the National League East for their first losing season since 1983. They were managed by Bud Harrelson and Mike Cubbage. They played home games at Shea Stadium.

An interesting note is that two Mets home games against the Cardinals were cancelled on August 19 and 20 due to the Crown Heights riot; this puts the 1991 Mets, alongside the 1992 Los Angeles Dodgers and the 2015 Baltimore Orioles to have games affected due to riots.

1993 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1993 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 111th season in the history of the franchise The team won the National League East championship and defeated the Atlanta Braves in the 1993 National League Championship Series in six games, before losing the World Series to the Toronto Blue Jays.

1995 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 1995 season was a season in American baseball. It consisted of the Reds winning the National League Central, and the National League Division Series in three straight games over the Los Angeles Dodgers before losing the National League Championship Series in four games to the eventual World Series champion Atlanta Braves.

1995 National League Championship Series

The 1995 National League Championship Series (NLCS), the second round of baseball's 1995 National League playoffs, matched the East Division champion Atlanta Braves against the Central Division champion Cincinnati Reds. The Reds had the home field advantage due to a predetermined formula which awarded home field advantage to the Central Division champion or its playoff opponent.

The two teams were victorious in the NL Division Series (NLDS), with the Braves defeating the wild card qualifier Colorado Rockies three games to one, and the Reds defeating the West Division champion Los Angeles Dodgers three games to none. The Braves won the series four games to none to become the National League champions, and defeated the American League champion Cleveland Indians in the 1995 World Series.

This NLCS was notable as it matched up what had been the two easternmost teams in the National League West Division from 1969–1993, both teams having been placed there at the insistence of the New York Mets and Chicago Cubs (the former team wanted the Cubs' rivals St. Louis Cardinals, then the dominating power of the NL, in the National League East Division, and the Cubs wanted in the same division as St. Louis). It was also the first NLCS since 1989 not to feature either the Philadelphia Phillies or the Pittsburgh Pirates. The two teams reigned exclusively as NL East champions from 1990 to 1993.The Braves would go on to defeat the Cleveland Indians in the World Series in six games.

1995 National League Division Series

The 1995 National League Division Series (NLDS), the opening round of the 1995 National League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 3, and ended on Saturday, October 7, with the champions of the three NL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. As a result of both leagues realigning into three divisions in 1994, it marked the first time in major league history that a team could qualify for postseason play without finishing in first place in its league or division. The teams were:

(1) Atlanta Braves (Eastern Division champion, 90–54) vs. (4) Colorado Rockies (Wild Card, 77–67): Braves win series, 3–1.

(2) Cincinnati Reds (Central Division champion, 85–59) vs. (3) Los Angeles Dodgers (Western Division champion, 78–66): Reds win series, 3–0.The Atlanta Braves and Cincinnati Reds went on to meet in the NL Championship Series (NLCS). The Braves became the National League champion, and defeated the American League champion Cleveland Indians in the 1995 World Series.

1995 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1995 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 113th season in the history of the franchise.

1996 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 1996 season consisted of the Cincinnati Reds attempting to win the National League Central.

1997 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1997 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 115th season in the history of the franchise.

1998 American League Division Series

The 1998 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 1998 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, September 29, and ended on Saturday, October 3, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

(1) New York Yankees (Eastern Division champion, 114–48) vs. (3) Texas Rangers (Western Division champion, 88–74): Yankees win series, 3–0.

(2) Cleveland Indians (Central Division champion, 89–73) vs. (4) Boston Red Sox (Wild Card, 92–70): Indians win series, 3–1.The New York Yankees and Cleveland Indians went on to meet in the AL Championship Series (ALCS). The Yankees became the American League champion, and defeated the National League champion San Diego Padres in the 1998 World Series.

1998 Boston Red Sox season

The 1998 Boston Red Sox season was the 98th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League East with a record of 92 wins and 70 losses, 22 games behind the New York Yankees. The Red Sox qualified for the postseason as the AL wild card, but lost to the American League Central champion Cleveland Indians in the ALDS.

2000 Boston Red Sox season

The 2000 Boston Red Sox season was the 100th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League East with a record of 85 wins and 77 losses, 2½ games behind the New York Yankees. The Red Sox did not qualify for the postseason, as the AL wild card was the Seattle Mariners who had finished second in the American League West with a record of 91–71.

2001 Boston Red Sox season

The 2001 Boston Red Sox season was the 101st season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League East with a record of 82 wins and 79 losses, 13½ games behind the New York Yankees. The Red Sox did not qualify for the postseason, as the AL wild card was the Oakland Athletics who had finished second in the American League West with a record of 102–60.

Columbia Mets

Located in Columbia, South Carolina, the Columbia Mets were affiliated with the New York Mets from 1983 to 1992. A member of the South Atlantic League, they became the Capital City Bombers in 1993. They played in Capital City Stadium.

Kingsport Mets

The Kingsport Mets are a Minor League Baseball team of the Appalachian League and the Rookie affiliate of the New York Mets. They are located in Kingsport, Tennessee, and are named for the team's major league affiliate. The team plays its home games at Hunter Wright Stadium which opened in 1995 and has a seating capacity of 2,500. The Mets previously played at Dobyns-Bennett High School. In 1983, while Dobyns-Bennett's field was being renovated, the team temporarily moved to Sarasota, Florida, and played in the Gulf Coast League as the Gulf Coast League Mets.

Norfolk Tides

The Norfolk Tides are a professional minor league baseball team in the Triple-A International League. They play at Harbor Park in Norfolk, Virginia. Since 2007 they have been a farm team of the Baltimore Orioles; prior to that, they had a 38-year affiliation with the New York Mets.

Sammy Ellis

Samuel Joseph Ellis (February 11, 1941 – May 13, 2016) was an American professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Cincinnati Reds, California Angels, and Chicago White Sox. Ellis was an MLB All-Star in 1965.

St. Lucie Mets

The St. Lucie Mets are a minor league baseball team based in Port St. Lucie, Florida.

The team, which plays in the Florida State League, is the Class A-Advanced affiliate of the New York Mets major-league club.

The team plays at First Data Field, which is currently undergoing a $60 million renovation as part of an agreement with the Mets to continue spring training there for an additional 25 years. Opened in 1988, the park seats 7,347 fans.

They have won the Florida State League Championship five times (1988, 1996, 1998, 2003, and 2006).

Former St. Lucie Mets players currently on the New York Mets roster include Noah Syndergaard and 2014 NL Rookie of the Year and 2018 NL Cy Young Award winner Jacob deGrom.

The team announced on June 25, 2017, that Tim Tebow was promoted to the Mets from the Columbia Fireflies, and would play against the Palm Beach Cardinals on June 27.

Tom Parrott

Thomas William Parrott (April 10, 1868 – January 1, 1932), nicknamed "Tacky Tom", was a professional baseball player. He was a right-handed pitcher over parts of four seasons (1893–1896) with the Chicago Colts, Cincinnati Reds and St. Louis Browns. For his career, he compiled a 39–48 record in 115 appearances, with a 5.33 earned run average and 166 strikeouts.

Parrott was born in Portland, Oregon, in 1868, and died in Dundee, Oregon, at the age of 63. He grew up outside of Sherwood, Oregon. His brother, Walter "Jiggs" Parrott, also played Major League Baseball.

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